A black hole is a volume from which photons, or any matter, can not escape. More formally, the coordinate speed of light at the event horizon - the boundary of a black hole - is zero, as measured by a sufficiently separated observer.

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On black holes, Hawking radiation and gravitational atoms

Over the past hour or so I've been following one of my standard physics-based, wanders-through-the-internet. Specifically, I began by reviewing some details of dark energy theory but soon found myself ...
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How can you tell if a critical energy density is actually a black hole?

Here's a question inspired by Edward's answer to this question. It's my understanding that the average energy density of a black hole in its rest frame is $\rho_\text{BH}(A)$, a function of surface ...
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Is it possible to have a singularity with zero mass?

A singularity, by the definition I know, is a point in space with infinite of a property such as density. Density is Mass/Volume. Since the volume of a singularity is 0, then the density will thus ...
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following up dark matter accretion in supermassive black holes

A while ago, there was some conspicuous evidence that supermassive black holes didn't seem to be eating dark matter at the expected rate of 70%-30%, in fact, only 10% of the black hole mass increase ...
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When a neutral star with a magnetic field collapses to form a black hole, what happens to the magnetic field?

By the no-hair theorem, black holes are only characterized by mass, charge and angular momentum. If the star is neutral, the black hole will have only mass and angular momentum - and therefore it ...
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Can we tell a wormhole from a black hole by observation?

I'm assuming stable wormhole really exist (naturally/microscopic or not) how can we distinguish between a wormhole and a black hole since we can't probe their "insides"?
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Does gravity limit the number of bosons that can occupy the same single-particle state?

QFT says that an unlimited number of bosons can occupy the same "state" (what I mean by that is that the whole system's wavefunction is composed of a product of many identical wavefunctions). ...
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Are black holes (and the universe in general) said to exhibit Ostwald's Ripening?

Ostwald's Ripening is a phenomenon where the surface area to volume ratio of droplets causes small particles to shrink until they disappear and for droplets above a certain volume to continuously ...
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A question about gravity [duplicate]

Some time ago I encouraged by 11 year old son to watch Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey with Neil DeGrasse Tyson, and subsequently Cosmos: A personal Voyage with Carl Sagan, as well as other astronomy ...
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202 views

How many of which particles are in Hawking radiation?

My understanding is that a black hole radiates ~like an ideal black body, and that both photons and massive particles are emitted by Hawking radiation. So for a low temperature black hole, photons are ...
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Equilibrium for a rope hanging in a Schwarzschild spacetime

Update: Trimok and MBN helped me solve most of my confusion. However, there is still an extra term $-(2/r)T$ in the final result. Brown doesn't write this term, and it seems physically wrong. Update ...
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Is there a black hole interior in black hole complementarity?

According to black hole complementarity, for an external observer, the interior of the black hole is replaced with a stretched horizon at a Planck distance above where the horizon ought to be. Is this ...
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random matrix ensembles from BMN model

My friends working on Thermalization of Black Holes explained solutions to their matrix-valued differential equations (from numerical implementation of the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase matrix model) ...
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Black hole collision and the event horizon

Will the event horizons of a two black holes be perturbed or bent before a collision? What will the shape of the event horizon appear to be immediately after first contact?
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Link between Hawking-Bekenstein Black hole entropy and entanglement entropy

I'm currently doing a project on two sided Ads-Schwarzschild black holes in the context of Ads/CFT. I want to show that the entanglement entropy between the two CFTs corresponds approximately to the ...
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If nothing ever falls into a black hole, why is there a puzzle about information?

From an outside perspective, nothing can ever pass the event horizon. It just scooches asymptotically close to the event horizon. So (from our perspective on earth), when a black hole reduces in ...
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Does nature of singularity in black hole depend on material that fell in?

Electromagnetic waves have a tracesless stress energy tensor, and therefore if they are the only fields in a region of spacetime, the Ricci curvature scalar $R=0$ according to GR. However $R^{\mu\nu} ...
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Thermal AdS and the Hawking Page phase transition

I have some difficulty understanding the concept of pure thermal radiation, as described in Hawking and Page's paper on the Hawking-Page phase transition. The four-dimensional thermal AdS solution ...
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Could dark energy make a large black hole less black?

Theoretically, if a black hole grew to a huge scale such that the effect of dark energy was large, could the black hole become 'normal' space again (i.e. no horizon or singularity)? What I'm trying ...
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Holographic principle “inside-out view”

From the perspective inside a black hole: Is information about everything outside a black hole - the rest of the cosmos - represented on the inside of the (event) horizon too? NB. I realize it is the ...
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Is it possible for a black hole to form for an observer at spatial infinity?

To my knowledge if you calculate the coordinate time (time experienced by an observer at spatial infinity) it takes an infinite amount of time for an object to fall past the horizon of a Schwarzschild ...
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Do spacelike junctions in the Thin-Shell Formalism imply energy nonconservation and counterintuitive wormholes?

The Thin Shell Formalism (MTW 1973 p.551ff) is used to properly paste together different vacuum solutions to the Einstein equations. At the junction of the two solutions is a hypersurface of matter – ...
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From the perspective of an observer inside a black hole's horizon, where does the energy for Hawking radiation come from?

Would energy be seen to "flow" to the outside of the black hole? Through what mechanism?
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How much of a star falls into a black hole?

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/04/05/astronomers-may-have-witnessed-a-star-torn-apart-by-a-black-hole/ A lot of the star in the disc, a lot of the star in the jets, precisely how ...
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What happens to a particle in the exact center of a Kerr black hole?

Kerr black holes (and Kerr-Newman black holes), instead of the "point" singularity theorized in spherically symmetric black holes, instead have a "ring" singularity, spread along the equatorial plane ...
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Is it possible to have fermions in Schwarzschild spacetime?

To my understanding Geroch proved that on 4-dimensional non-compact manifold a necessary and sufficient condition for a manifold to have a notion of spinors is to be parallelizabe .1 (General ...
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What do we learn from gravity in three spacetime dimensions?

The last decades there has been a lot of research going on in the the area of three dimensional gravity. The motivation, I understand, is threefold: Whereas gravity is not perturbatively ...
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Do semiclassical GR and charge quantisation imply magnetic monopoles?

Assuming charge quantisation and semiclassical gravity, would the absence of magnetically charged black holes lead to a violation of locality, or some other inconsistency? If so, how? (I am not ...
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Relaxation time for deviations from spherical shape of a black hole's event horizon (and waves)

A different question about truly spherical objects in nature (Do spheres exist in nature?) made me think of a lecture I had been at where, as I recall, it was mentioned that the most perfectly ...
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paper about black branes and implications to 4d black holes

This paper makes a case for piezoelectric response (electric dipole moment under mechanical oscillations) of black branes. This paper does not make an implication of their results for 4D black holes ...
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Can we have consistent histories inside a black hole?

A consistent history is a POVM set of observables corresponding to a time-ordered product of projection operators. For gauge theories, not any old operator will do, only gauge-invariant observables. ...
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Maximal kinetic energy due to gravitational attraction

Two related questions: Small object of mass $m$ is falling into the supermassive black hole of mass $M$. What is the maximal kinetic energy can be acquired by the small object, from the point of ...
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Is there a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way?

Is it true that the whole galaxy is actually revolving, and powered by a black hole? Has it been proven, and if it is true, how can our solar systems actually keep up the momentum to withstand the ...
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Charged Black holes - What is the Interest in those?

Here in this forum (and elsewhre) I read about "charged" black holes. What is the background for this questions? Is this more a question of theroretical interest? In "practice" :=) black holes ...
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What is the shape of a black hole?

I was thinking; what shape does a black hole have?. By 'Shape', I mean its form (e.g, circle , cylinder, sphere, torus, etc..). We usually think of black holes as if they're plugholes (e.g, a flat ...
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What is the “Event Horizon” of a black hole [duplicate]

Can someone please explain what the event horizon of a black hole is? I mean is it the actual surface of the black hole or is it the point of no return where light can no longer escape?
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Why does the event horizon of a black hole not look like a bright sphere?

All infalling matter-energy appears to an external observer as frozen in time at the event horizon. Why then is this horizon not extremely bright due to radiation that is able to escape radially? So ...
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How could we travel to the nearest supermassive Black hole?

I have just watched a trailer for the upcoming movie Interstellar and started to wonder about some physics involved. In the end of the trailer, they are obviously plunging into a Black hole hoping to ...
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Is there a peak gravitational force between bodies?

Suppose Object A is exerting gravitational force on Object B. Object A increases in mass, and so increases in volume, increasing the gravitational force on Object B. But, since mass occupies space the ...
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Is it possible to escape from within event horizon?

I always think that it is not possible to escape from within event horizon. However, some one recently told me with deep conviction that it is possible with sustained energy output. I countered with ...
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What would a rotating black-hole look like to a “geo-stationary” observer orbiting the black hole

A rotating black hole is believed to contain a ring singularity rather than a point. However, if an astronaut is orbiting the black hole at exactly the same angular velocity as the blackhole (in ...
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Black holes have conservative potentials. Why don't things “swing” in and out?

Black holes attract objects via gravity, which is a conservative force. Thinking from conservation of energy, It seems like for an object moving toward them, they should be able to "swing" into and ...
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Is a black hole a perfect black body?

A black body absorbs all light/radiation in its reach. According to basic laws of physics, the more energy a body absorbs the more it can emit. Therefore, a black body absorbs all energy directed at ...
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How small are the smallest black holes?

How little mass can a black hole contain and still be a "stable" black hole? What would the diameter be, in terms of the event horizon?
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Black hole analog experiment?

This question is directed mostly at people giving lectures on black holes, but input by other physicists or students is very much appreciated. Do you know a good (home)-experiment with a black hole ...
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What kind of systems of black holes satisfy the laws of black hole thermodynamics?

I've come across black holes thermodynamics multiple times recently (both at this site and elsewhere) and some things started bugging me. For one thing, first law bothers me a little. It is a ...
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If a magnetic monopole falls into a schwarzchild black hole, what happens to the magnetic field?

By the no-hair theorem, black holes can only have mass, charge and angular momentum. Does "charge" include "magnetic charge" (such as from a magnetic monopole)? Can black holes have magnetic charge ...
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What will the universe look like for anyone falling into a black hole?

I've heard that, from the perspective of an external observer, something falling into a black hole will eventually look "frozen": light waves will move to the infrared and further into lower ...
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Spacetime diagram of a collapse of a rotating star

There is a well-known "standard" spacetime diagram (Kruskal and Penrose) for the collapse of a spherically symmetric star to a Schwarzschild black hole (for example here, or here in EF), which stands ...
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Amateur's question on Black Holes [duplicate]

Black holes are caused by massive curvature of the fabric of space-time. Is it right in believing theoretically that forces of electromagnetic origin could also lead to distortion of the fabric of ...