A black hole is a volume from which photons, or any matter, can not escape. More formally, the coordinate speed of light at the event horizon - the boundary of a black hole - is zero, as measured by a sufficiently separated observer.

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Information Preservation and Burning Books

I recently read an article in the NY Times called A Black Hole Mystery Wrapped in a Firewall Paradox. I really liked the article, but reading one quote immediately made me think of asking Physics.SE a ...
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Fighting a black hole: Could a strong spherical shell inside an event horizon resist falling in to the singularity?

As a thought experiment imagine an incredibly strong spherical shell with a diameter a bit smaller than the event horizon of a particular large black hole. The shell is split into two hemispheres, ...
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Thought Experiment - Poking a stick across a Black Hole's Event Horizon

The classical explanation of a black hole says that if you get to close, you reach a point - the event horizon radius - from which you cannot escape even travelling at the speed of light. Then they ...
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What happens to atoms inside a black hole?

Black holes have very high gravitational force that tends to crush everything. So as we know atoms in a molecule have inter-atomic spacing between them and further electrons also revolve at a certain ...
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Time Dilation inside a hollow shell

Assuming I have a hollow shell with total mass $M$ and radius $r$. On the surface, the gravitational time dilation would be $$\tau=t \cdot \sqrt{1-\frac{v_{esc}^2}{c^2}}$$ where $$v_{esc} = ...
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Could an ultra-relativistic particle tunnel directly through a stellar mass black hole?

It occurred to me in passing that the Lorentz contraction of a black hole from the perspective of an ultra-relativistic (Lorentz factor larger than about 10^16) particle could reduce the thickness of ...
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Global symmetry in string theory

It is often stated that in quantum gravity only charges coupled to gauge fields can be conserved. This is because of the no hair theorem. If a charge is coupled to a gauge field then when it falls ...
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Could a ship equipped with Alcubierre drive theoretically escape from a black hole?

Could a ship equipped with Alcubierre drive theoretically escape from a black hole? Also, could it reach parts of the universe that are receding faster than the speed of light from us?
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So Black Holes Actually Merge! In 1/5th of a Second - How?

I've read a lot of conflicting answers in these forums. However, today saw the awesome announcement of gravitational waves. Two black holes merged: ...
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If you are carrying a magnet, can you tell when you cross the event horizon of a black hole?

By the no hair theorem, a black hole is completely characterized by it's mass, charge and angular momentum. Therefore dipole and higher pole magnetic fields are completely expelled when a black hole ...
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Why don't black holes form from forces other than gravity?

Gravity is the weakest of the fundamental forces, so what is so special about gravity that it can form an inescapably strong field while a force like the EM force cannot? It seems to me that if there ...
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Will a black hole eventually turn into a neutron star?

As far as i understand, black holes radiate away energy in form of Hawking Radiation. Thus, they lose mass, i suppose. Is there a point where the mass becomes too small for the object to still be a ...
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Could micro black holes obey the Eddington limit?

A stellar-mass black hole has recently been discovered in the Andromeda galaxy. One interesting part of the release is that this black hole shines close to its Eddington limit. Quasars are ...
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Information encoded on the surface of a black hole

If an object that enters a black hole has its information content frozen at the event horizon, in what sense is it frozen? The usual analogy is of a hologram encoded in 2d which can be decoded into a ...
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What are the implications for the AdS/Cft program if AdS is unstable?

To my understanding recent progress in the study of the non linear stability of AdS spacetime suggest that $AdS$ might be unstable. If this is true, what are the physical and mathematical ...
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Why does angular momentum shorten the Schwarzschild Radius of a black hole?

Angular momentum causes the event horizon of a black hole to recede. At maximum angular momentum, $J=GM^2/c$, the Schwarzschild radius is half of what it would be if the black hole wasn't spinning. ...
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Does the mass of a star change as it collapses into a black hole?

I know (I think!) that when a really big star collapses on itself it creates a black hole. My question: When a star collapses, is the mass equal to the mass of the star when it's not a black hole? Or ...
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Black hole complementarity - absorption of Hawking radiation

I try to understand two principles formulated by Leonard Susskind in his book The Black Hole War: 1, To any observer who remains outside a black hole, the stretched horizon appears to be a hot layer ...
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Which way do black hole jets spin?

The centers of black holes and quasars often have jets coming out the two poles of an accretion disk, say north and south. Is it known if the two jets spin in the same direction or opposite ...
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Coupling between galaxy spin and central black hole spin

What is the relationship between the spin of a galaxy and the spin of its corresponding black hole? Associated questions: Do they always have the same axis of rotation? Do they always spin in the ...
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Will an object always fall at an infinite speed in a black hole?

Most of you if not everybody will agree that the stronger the gravitational pull, the faster an object will fall. For example, on a planet with 50 times the gravity of Earth, any object will hit the ...
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Why we don't see time dilation in stars orbiting black hole?

We have images of stars orbiting black holes or black holes destroying near stars, but why do we see the stars moving normally? I mean, if time dilation does exist, shouldn't we see that stars slow ...
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Why don't electrons collaspe into black holes? [duplicate]

An electron has a mass of $9.10938291(40) \times 10^{−31} kg$. It also has a volume of $0 m^3$. This would imply it has infinite density. Shouldn't that make it collapse into a black hole? Why doesn't ...
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What is the physical size of a black hole?

Something that's always confused me. How large is a black hole's physical size - not mass? From descriptions, it would seem that the 'singularity' is a single point, but is it really? Say for ...
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Why aren't all black holes the same “size”?

The center of a black hole is a singularity. By definition, a singularity has infinite density. So how can a black hole with a different mass or density be described?
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What happens to orbits at small radii in general relativity?

I know that (most) elliptic orbits precess due to the math of general relativity, like this: source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-body_problem_in_general_relativity I also know that something ...
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Collision of charged black holes

Suppose there are two charged black holes which collide to form a bigger black hole. But when they combine, a lot of potential energy of the system is lost/gained depending on their charges (the ...
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The final parsec “problem”

Many and perhaps all galaxies seem to contain supermassive black holes of about $10^7 M_\odot$ at their centres. Determining their origins is of great astrophysical interest. In what I understand to ...
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Neutron stars and black holes

The official limits for a neutron star is $1.4 - 3.2\;M_\odot$. But I read that the limit depends on the particular structure of a star to estimate which mass it must have. I also read that neutron ...
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Moving black holes

What happens to the fabric of space in the wake of a moving black hole? Is space permanently deformed by a moving black hole or does it rebound as the black hole passes?
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Where do the bipolar jets of black holes come from?

How are they formed? And why are they so bright?
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Deriving Birkhoff's Theorem

I am trying to derive Birkhoff's theorem in GR as an exercise: a spherically symmetric gravitational field is static in the vacuum area. I managed to prove that $g_{00}$ is independent of t in the ...
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If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion? [duplicate]

If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion?
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Event Horizon violability?

Is the "event horizon" of a black hole potentially violable? Black holes are commonly described as being unidirectional (matter / energy goes in, but doesn't come out), but is the event horizon of a ...
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If Black Hole never forms, how important will be to study Black Hole paradoxes?

I recently came across a paper Black Hole - Never Forms, or Never Evaporates. It is claimed that under general evaporation conditions, before particles come into the Black Hole, the Black Hole itself ...
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Surface gravity of Kerr black hole

I'm going through Kerr metric, and following the 'Relativist's toolkit' derivation of the surface gravity, I've come to a part that I don't understand. Firstly, the metric is given by ...
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How does the star that has collapsed to form a Schwarschild black hole appear to an observer falling into the black hole?

I understand that to an outside observer, the light from a star that is collapsing into a black hole will become more and more red-shifted as the surface of the star appears to approach the black hole ...
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Is it expected that all stellar black holes will be spinning near the maximum allowed $\omega$-velocity?

Using a bit of classical reasoning I'm imagining black hole formation to be much like an ice skater pulling in her arms: Now, the size difference between a star and its black hole can't even be ...
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Multipolar expansion profile of Hawking radiation on Kerr black holes

I would be very curious if Kerr black holes emit Hawking radiation at the same temperature in the equatorial bulges and in their polar regions. I've been looking some reference for this for a couple ...
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An electron falling into a black hole

If an electron falls into a black hole. How can the Heisenberg uncertainty principle hold? The electron has fallen into the singularity now so it has a well defined position which means that it ...
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Geometry inside the event horizon

I'm trying to understand intuitively the geometry as it would look to an observer entering the event horizon of a Schwarszchild black hole. I would appreciate any insights or corrections to the above. ...
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Would a collision of two black holes emit any electromagnetic radiation?

The video linked in this answer shows how space-time would be distorted during such an event. No doubt such an event would be an extremely strong source of gravitational waves. But would anything be ...
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Thermodynamically reversed black holes, firewalls, Casimir effect, null energy condition violations

Scott Aaronson asked a very deep question at Hawking radiation and reversibility about what happens if black hole evolution is reversed thermodynamically. Most of the commenters missed his point ...
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How do we know that black holes evaporate?

This has been bugging me for some time. As I understand it, Hawking radiation is the result of the mismatch between the vacuum state of a quantum field as seen by a free falling observer (falling ...
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Is it mathematically possible for a black hole to be connected to a white hole or a worm hole?

I know that there's no evidence at this point for "white holes" however would it even be mathematically possible for a black hole to be connected to a white hole (total opposite so everything would be ...
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Can two particles remain entangled even if one is past the event horizon of a black hole?

Can two particles remain entangled even if one is past the event horizon of a black hole? If both particles are in the black hole? What changes occur when the particle(s) crosses(cross) the event ...
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Can something (again) ever fall through the event horizon?

Since I am more confused by the answers given in this site to the many variants and duplicates of this question, with some arguing that from the point of view of the falling observer, it happens in ...
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Could you theoretically map the internal distribution of mass in a black hole using Hawking radiation?

Assuming you could measure the qualities of the radiation emanating from all around a black hole, could this be used to determine the internal geometry or makeup of the mass inside?
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Why aren't we surrounded by Black holes?

The Bekenstein bound is a limit to the amount of entropy a thermodynamical system can have. The bound is given by the following expression: \begin{equation} S \leq \frac{2 \pi k R E}{\hbar c} ...
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Can gravitational waves act as information carriers between observers in- and outside a black hole?

Is it possible to utilize gravitational waves as a delivery system for information between two observers straddling the event horizon of a black hole? And why ?