A black hole is a volume from which photons, or any matter, can not escape. More formally, the coordinate speed of light at the event horizon - the boundary of a black hole - is zero, as measured by a sufficiently separated observer.

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What constitutes a blackhole firewall?

I understand that, to break the entanglement of two particles of Hawking radiation and therefore preserve monogamy of entanglement, there should be a firewall around the event horizon. This firewall ...
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Taking selfies while falling, would you be able to notice a horizon before hitting a singularity?

I am generally interested in the role of "pings"(0a) between participants (a.k.a. "signal roundtrips"(0b), as familiar for instance from Synge's "five point curvature detector") in the determination ...
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What will the universe look like for anyone falling into a black hole?

I've heard that, from the perspective of an external observer, something falling into a black hole will eventually look "frozen": light waves will move to the infrared and further into lower ...
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How can a black hole zap a galaxy into existence?

I am referring to this picture published here. Apparently super massive black holes emit radiation and matter in astrophysical jets. And these jets can form galaxies. I have some questions: Isn't ...
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White Hole Formation and Queries

How do white holes form? Why are they called the "time-reversed" versions of a black hole? What's an "eternal" black hole? How come a white hole is only encountered if you remove the star from the ...
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Euclidean derivation of the black hole temperature; conical singularities

I am studying the derivation of the black hole temperature by means of the Euclidean approach, i.e. by Wick rotating, compactifying the Euclidean time and identifying the period with the inverse ...
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Has the black hole information loss paradox been settled?

This question was triggered by a comment of Peter Shor's (he is a skeptic, it seems.) I thought that the holographic principle and AdS/CFT dealt with that, and was enough for Hawking to give John ...
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General definition of an event horizon?

Horizons are in general observer-dependent. For example, in Minkowski space, an observer who experiences constant proper acceleration has a horizon. Black hole horizons are usually defined as ...
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At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?

I initially thought it was inversely proportional to the mass, but I think that's wrong because temperature is inversely proportional to mass. If someone could give the formula(s) for finding this ...
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What is the radius of the event horizon?

I know that the Schwarzschild radius is given by $$r~=~\frac{2GM}{c^{2}}.\tag{1}$$ However, If we had the metric $$ds^2~=~−A(r,t)dt^2+\frac{dr^2}{B(r,t)}+r^2(dθ^2+\sin^2{θ}dϕ^2),\tag{2}$$ where ...
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Supermassive black holes with the density of the Universe

This question was inspired by the answer to the question "If the universe were compressed into a super massive black hole, how big would it be" Assume that we have a matter with a uniform density ...
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How does light behave within a black hole's event horizon?

If the event horizon of a black hole is the distance from the center from within which light cannot escape, imagine a person with a flashlight falls into the black hole. He points his flashlight in a ...
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Binary Black Hole Solution of General Relativity?

This is rather a technical question for experts in General Relativity. An accessible link would be an accepable answer, although any additional discussion is welcome. GR has well known solutions ...
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Hawking radiation and reversibility

It's often said that, as long as the information that fell into a black hole comes out eventually in the Hawking radiation (by whatever means), pure states remain pure rather than evolving into mixed ...
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How can a black hole reduce the speed of light?

If the speed of light is always constant then light should escape from a black hole because if directed radially outwards it only needs to travel a finite distance to escape, and at a speed of $c$ it ...
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Evidence for black hole event horizons

I know that there's a lot of evidence for extremely compact bodies. But is there any observation from which we can infer the existence of an actual horizon? Even if we are able to someday resolve ...
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Hawking radiation from point of view of a falling observer

This paper tells that Hawking claimed that the falling to a black hole observer will not detect any radiation. But only because the frequency of the Hawking radiation will be of the order $1/R_s$ so ...
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Why must a singularity form inside a black hole? [duplicate]

What is the exact reason that normal matter can not exist within an event horizon? I can understand how a super-dense object like a neutron star could accrete mass until its physical radius is less ...
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How does the star that has collapsed to form a Schwarschild black hole appear to an observer falling into the black hole?

I understand that to an outside observer, the light from a star that is collapsing into a black hole will become more and more red-shifted as the surface of the star appears to approach the black hole ...
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Do black holes have infinite areas and volumes?

How to calculate the area / volume of a black hole? Is there a corresponding mathematical function such as rotating $1/x$ around the $x$-axis or likewise to find the volume?
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Do new universes form on the other side of black holes?

I have four questions about black holes and universe formations. Do new universes form on the other side of black holes? Was our own universe formed by this process? Was our big bang a black hole ...
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Strongest force in nature

Possible Duplicate: What does it mean to say “Gravity is the weakest of the forces”? It is said nuclear force is the strongest force in nature.. But it is not true near a black ...
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The bigger the mass, the more time slows down. Why is this?

If I were to stand by a pyramid, which weighs about 20 million tons, I would slow down by a trillion million million million of second. Don't know if that's exactly right, but you get the point. Also, ...
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Is it possible for one black hole to pull an object out of another black hole?

Suppose we have a spacecraft just inside the event horizon of a black hole, struggling to escape, but slowly receding into it. Another (bigger) black hole expands until its event horizon includes the ...
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Black Hole Photon Sphere

The photon sphere is a spherical region in space where photons are forced to travel in an orbit at $r = \frac{3GM}{c^{2}}$. Is it possible to detect these spheres? What happens if I fall through ...
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How do we know that black holes evaporate?

This has been bugging me for some time. As I understand it, Hawking radiation is the result of the mismatch between the vacuum state of a quantum field as seen by a free falling observer (falling ...
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How could we travel to the nearest supermassive Black hole?

I have just watched a trailer for the upcoming movie Interstellar and started to wonder about some physics involved. In the end of the trailer, they are obviously plunging into a Black hole hoping to ...
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Special relativity paradox and gravitation/acceleration equivalence

One of the features of the black hole complementarity is the following : According to an external observer, the infinite time dilation at the horizon itself makes it appear as if it takes an ...
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The uncertainty principle and black holes

What are the consequences of applying the uncertainty principle to black holes? Does the uncertainty principle need to be modified in the context of a black hole and if so what are the implications ...
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710 views

How does an object falling into a plain Schwarschild black hole appear from near the black hole?

I know that when viewed from infinity (or from a very large distance from the black hole event horizon), an object that falls into the black hole will appear to slow down and will become more and more ...
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Smolin on Cosmological selection and neutron stars

Regarding the cosmological selection hypothesis and testable predictions, Lee Smolin asserted the following: "Smolin: I did make two predictions which were eminently checkable by astrophysical ...
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Can an object be infinitely small?

I read somewhere that the earth has to be smaller than 1 cm to become a black hole, according to Schwarzschild. Since big bang came from a singularity, I am wondering, is there any minimum volume for ...
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Gravitational lensing image from merging black holes

What kind of image would a transcient toroidial black hole merger produce from it's gravitalional lensing effect? http://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9905039 What does a torus shaped lens actually look like? ...
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Why can't dark matter be black holes?

Since 90 % of matter is what we cannot see, why can't it be black-holes from early on? Is is possible to figure out that there are no black holes in the line of sight of various stars/galaxies we ...
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What happens to light and mass in the center of a black hole?

I know that black holes are "black" because nothing can escape it due to the massive gravity, but I am wondering if there are any theories as to what happens to the light or mass that enters a black ...
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Will the Big Rip tear black holes apart?

There seems to be an obvious contradiction between the predictions of the physics of black holes and the Big Rip, a predicted event about 16.7 Gyr in the future where local groups, galaxies, solar ...
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Speed of gravity in cosmological codes and ephemeris generation

There are few questions in Phys.SE concerning the speed of gravity, and the answers are traditionally that the speed of gravity equals to the speed of light. But in that case I have three more ...
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What happens to light that falls into a black hole?

When light enters a black hole, what happens to it? I imagine the photons will either fall into the singularity, or the light will orbit just inside the event horizon indefinitely. (Some background ...
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What is the “Event Horizon” of a black hole [duplicate]

Can someone please explain what the event horizon of a black hole is? I mean is it the actual surface of the black hole or is it the point of no return where light can no longer escape?
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How small are the smallest black holes?

How little mass can a black hole contain and still be a "stable" black hole? What would the diameter be, in terms of the event horizon?
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If a magnetic monopole falls into a schwarzchild black hole, what happens to the magnetic field?

By the no-hair theorem, black holes can only have mass, charge and angular momentum. Does "charge" include "magnetic charge" (such as from a magnetic monopole)? Can black holes have magnetic charge ...
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What happens when a black hole dies?

It just vanishes into space leaving nothing behind or does it expel some material? Also, talking more about black holes, as far as i understand the term "temperature", it is defined by the amount of ...
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What would the effect be of a small black hole colliding with the earth?

If a small black hole (say about .1 mm radius or 1% of Earth's mass) came flying along at the speed of a comet or higher and impacted the earth, what would happen? Would it pass through the earth (and ...
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What happens to a photon in a black hole?

Assume a photon enters the event horizon of a black hole. The gravity of the black hole will draw the photon into the singularity eventually. Doesn't the photon come to rest and therefore lose it's ...
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Can light escape a black hole? [duplicate]

I heard that a black hole is not black because it's escape velocity is greater than or equals to the speed of light. But instead it is black because the light that gets emitted from a black hole gets ...
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How did LIGO detect the source location of the black holes mentioned to be the cause of today's announcement?

Today LIGO announced discovery of Gravitational waves. What method was used to determine the source location of the waves?
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A Conflict with Black Holes

If a particle with rest mass falls from r = infinity to r = Rs of a black hole it is supposed to reach a velocity of c. But where does all that energy (infinite) come from to bring the rest mass to a ...
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Practical time travel: time dilation above the event horizon

Imagine there is a huge black hole with very small gravity gradient so that one doesn't get killed by spaghettification after even nearing the event horizon. Now imagine a very curious creature ...
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In general relativity (GR), does time stop at the event horizon or in the central singularity of a black hole?

I was reading through this question on time and big bang, and @John Rennie's answer surprised me. In the immediate environment of a black hole, where does time stop ticking if one were to follow a ...