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3
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1answer
51 views

What does energy represent in $E= mc^2$?

Due to energy-mass equivalence, any object with mass can be said to have a corresponding amount of energy. So in a 5kg object there are 450,000,000,000 joules. A joule as i understand it is the ...
1
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1answer
68 views

correct formula for Mass Defect / Binding Energy? [closed]

I'm a web developer and I have to change an online course. The course teaches Advanced Nuclear Theory. In the 'Mass Defect and Binding Energy' chapter, it has this formula: $ \Delta M = Z(m_p) + ...
1
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2answers
71 views

binding energy of a nucleus is positive?

I have found from this link http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/nucene/nucbin.html that: Nuclei are made up of protons and neutron, but the mass of a nucleus is always less than the sum of the ...
2
votes
1answer
132 views

Radioactive decay / binding energies

If my understanding is correct, the binding energy determines a nucleus' stability and the greater the binding energy, the more stable the nucleus (e.g iron-56). The mass of the sum of nucleons that ...
5
votes
1answer
111 views

Does the Strong Nuclear Force follow Superposition?

I have just started the study of nuclear physics in my high school, and while reading about nuclear forces and binding energy per nucleon, I found out that the nuclear forces are highly short ranged ...
3
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2answers
264 views

Why can't Iron fusion occur in stars?

It is said that iron fusion is endothermic and star can't sustain this kind of fusion (not until it goes supernova). However star is constantly releasing energy from fusion of elements like Hydrogen ...
1
vote
1answer
175 views

Why is the binding energy per nucleon of helium-3 less than that of helium-4?

I'd guess it has to do with the structure of helium-3 allowing for greater Coulomb repulsion between the protons, but I'm unsure.
4
votes
2answers
84 views

Why is it energetically favourable for molecular bonds to form from a QM point of view?

For example, if you have two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom, they are all electrically neutral and don't attract each other. But then if they manage to get "close enough" somehow they snap together ...
0
votes
3answers
115 views

Mass-Energy Equivalence

I've asked before, but I'm still confused as to what the mass energy equivalence implies. I've taken an introductory course in relativity, so I only covered special relativity. From what I gather, all ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Why do Nuclei lose mass?

When it comes to things like gravity and the electromagnetic force, masses aren't reduced-but with nuclei the mass difference is noticeable. What about nuclear forces makes them capable of putting ...
1
vote
2answers
228 views

Nuclear Binding energy

The nuclear binding energy, is the energy that is needed to seperate the nucleons in a nucleus. And binding energy is also defined as the energy given out when a nucleus forms from nucleons. Also ...
1
vote
1answer
224 views

Proton mass and Weizsäcker's formula

I'm so confused in the use of nuclear masses and atomic masses. I have two questions. From the book "Outline of Modern Physics" by Ronald, I understand that the semiempirical mass formula ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

Highest naturally occuring binding energy of electrons

I was wondering which element has the highest binding energy of an electron. Is it simply the 1s electron of the heaviest stable element? If so, can somebody tell me where I can find a table of ...
10
votes
4answers
297 views

Why are alpha particles such a prominent form of radiation and not other types of nucleon arrangement?

It is said in many textbooks that alpha decay involves emitting alpha particles, which are very stable. Indeed, the binding energy (~28.3 MeV) is higher than for $Z$-neighboring stable isotopes. But ...
5
votes
2answers
532 views

Mass defect- From where mass is being lost?

As a school student, I have wondered while studying mass defect the following mysterious problem My assumption Just like a car's mass is constituted by each part of it(i.e total mass of car will be ...
7
votes
1answer
375 views

What if the binding energy becomes larger than the rest mass?

Looking at the equation for binding energy and mass defect, $$ B = m_{\text{free}} - m_{\text{bound}} \\ \Rightarrow m_{\text{bound}} = m_{\text{free}} - B, $$ my question is the following. Suppose ...
2
votes
1answer
526 views

Potential Energy in General Relativity

I often hear about how general relativity is very complicated because of all forms of energy are considered, including gravitation's own gravitational binding energy. I have two questions: In ...
3
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2answers
853 views

Why is the binding energy per nucleon not zero for hydrogen atom?

The lone proton has not to be worked on against any electrostatic force. So where does the energy come from? What is mass defect for a hydrogen nucleus?
4
votes
0answers
65 views

How fission and fusion create energy? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to explain $E=mc^2$ mass defect in fission/fusion In order for energy to be released, mass has to be "lost", because mass is a form of energy. In my science class, ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

How to explain $E=mc^2$ mass defect in fission/fusion

What is the nature of nuclear energy? This is closely related to the correct explanation of mass defect. I did some research of that topic and cannot come to a single comprehensive and consistent ...
0
votes
2answers
256 views

What happens if an object has more kinetic energy than the Gravitational Binding Energy?

So the binding energy of an object is the amount of energy needed to move it an infinite distance away from another mass to essentially “escape” its gravitational field. But what happens if you give ...
7
votes
2answers
355 views

What elements can be created in the fusion process of different types of stars?

As I understand it fusion inside a sun can produce heavier and heavier elements until some sort of "nucleus size limit" is reached. As far as I understand, the limit is thought to be reached with the ...
1
vote
3answers
450 views

The “binding energy” of bonded particles adds mass?

This is a follow-up my previous question. Several of the answers indicated that the mass of a particle (atom, proton, etc.) increase with the "binding energy" of it's component particles - the energy ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the difference between a neutron and hydrogen?

Differences? They are both an electron and a proton, since the neutron decays to a proton and an electron, what's the difference between a neutron and proton + electron? so is it just a higher binding ...
3
votes
1answer
118 views

Binding Energy of He

The graph of nuclear binding energy is relatively smooth going from H to U, except for He4 (alpha particle). Why is He4's binding energy so anomalously high compared to its neighboring isotopes?
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Mass into energy

The mass of a nucleus if less than the mass of the protons and nucleus. The difference is knows as binding energy of the nucleus. This nuclear binding energy is derived from the strong nuclear force. ...
20
votes
7answers
3k views

Is (rest) mass quantized?

I learned today in class that photons and light are quantized. I also remember that electric charge is quantized as well. I was thinking about these implications, and I was wondering if (rest) mass ...
4
votes
1answer
312 views

Obtaining isotope stability

For a given isotope, one can obtain the binding energy using the semi-empirical mass formula. For example, has a binding energy of 1782.8 MeV. From this information, how can the likelihood of the ...