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0answers
22 views

How does a Collider work? [closed]

How does a collider work, explained using various Physics theories (or if there is a main one) . How does the acceleration play a part in the individual sub-atomic kinetic levels. What happens when ...
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2answers
2k views

Why is Iron the most stable element? [duplicate]

Iron has the highest binding energy per nucleon in the entirety of the known elements. But why Iron specifically? What makes it have the highest binding energy per nucleon?
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1answer
43 views

Why do products of nuclear decay have a lower mass than the original nucleus, when the sum of the mass of its nucleons is larger? [duplicate]

I've just started covering the topic of binding energy in Year 13 at school (final year before University). The definition we've been given of binding energy is that it is the work done when ...
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1answer
37 views

How is electromagnetic binding energy introduced in the stress-energy tensor

Take the hydrogen atom. It is easy to imagine that the gravitational pull it creates is smaller than the sum of those of the proton plus the electron, because a photon of 13.6 eV was created when the ...
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1answer
38 views

How can one interaction influence the way another interaction generates mass?

This question arose as a follow-up of this one and applies generally to all interactions and all ways to generate mass. To make it clear, I take here the example of the neutron, whose mass is in ...
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2answers
69 views

Gravitational binding energy of 2D circle [closed]

I'm interested in calculating the gravitational binding energy for an object modelled by 2D circle for a small collision simulator. In the simulation, I'm using a 2D equivalents of 3D properties (e.g ...
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3answers
324 views

Are chemical bonds matter?

So it recently blew my mind that chemical bonds have mass. And that a spring that's wound up similarly weights a little more. But there is a distinction between mass and matter. I believe that a ...
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1answer
99 views

Can energy be weighed?

The binding energy of nucleus is calculated as- Mass defect = (Total mass of nucleons-Mass of the nucleus) And after that $E=mc^2$ is used for calculating the binding energy. Hot water is heavier ...
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1answer
93 views

Does the rest mass energy include the potential energy of the particle?

The potential energy (as far as I have studied - that is, mainly classical physics) depends on the reference level, since its absolute value cannot be calculated. It can therefore be negative as well. ...
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2answers
60 views

Does chemical energy contribute to mass? [duplicate]

Does chemical energy contribute to the mass of an object? I don't mean the bond energy, but the possible energy that could be released (i.e. Does an atom of oxygen and a molecule of hydrogen (H2) have ...
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0answers
31 views

How to explain binding energy of electron in Geant4 particle transport code?

The question is related to binding energy of electrons in oxygen atom. First I will put the question and later explain how did I came across it. ========= The question =============== In the ...
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1answer
64 views

How does fusion work in the Sun if neutrons have more mass than protons?

According to my textbook, the next result of the fusion reactions in the Sun is: 4H -> He + neutrinos + gamma photons However, if hydrogen atoms are basically a proton and helium atoms are 2 protons ...
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3answers
78 views

Is there an example of a situation where you need a continuous spectrum?

If you had a hydrogen atom you could say that you want to be able to ionize them. But if you then add the potential due to the earth, e.g. ...
2
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3answers
113 views

What is the binding energy of a black hole?

As the particles which constitute a black hole collapse they become tightly bound. I assume this means a lot of energy would be required to liberate a particle from that bound state. Is it a finite ...
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3answers
409 views

What is the binding energy of a neutron star?

Neutrons which constitute a neutron star have a rest mass that is greater when separated from the star because they are bound with a certain potential energy. This potential energy causes the system ...
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2answers
2k views

Do chemical bonds have mass?

When an exothermic reaction occurs, the energy in the chemical bonds of the reactants is partially transferred to the chemical bonds of the products. The remaining energy is released as heat. For ...
4
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1answer
91 views

Binding energy and mass

I’ve been told that a greater binding energy means the nucleus is more tightly bound, and therefore that decreases the mass of the nucleus with respect to its nucleons when separated. But why does a ...
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2answers
98 views

What is the binding energy in General Relativity?

In general relativity, the potential energy is given by $$V(r)=\frac{h^{2}}{2r^{2}}\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)-\frac{M}{r}.$$ Solving $V^{\prime}(r)=0$, there are two points where circular orbits ...
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1answer
59 views

Why do elements on the Binding Energy per Nuclear Molecule after Iron (most stable) even form?

So I was reading about the stability of elements based on Nuclear Binding Energy, and I saw that the 'Iron group' of elements were most tightly bound and hence most stable, and that is why the graph ...
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3answers
166 views

Is it possible for man to break Earth into 2 parts? [closed]

Many countries have extreme devastating nuclear weapons. Also they have weapons in very large numbers. I want to ask that Is it possible for man to break earth into 2 parts with the help ...
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1answer
117 views

Total energy of neutrons and protons

In a stable nucleus, are the total energies of neutrons and protons same?
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3answers
4k views

When an atom is split, what form of energy is released?

When an atom is split, what form of energy is released? All of the websites I have looked at say there is a lot of energy released when an atom is split, but it never says what form of energy it is ...
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4answers
311 views

Coupling fission and fusion and disappear all mass. Why doesn't this happen?

I'm confused about the fact that in a fission process the masses of the "products" are less than the mass of the "reactants". And in a fusion process the masses of the "products" are less than the ...
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0answers
34 views

Binding energy per nucleon dependency

For a given isotope, does the nuclear binding energy per nucleon depend on the presence of electrons? For instance, if an electron was excited by an incoming photon and jumps to a different orbital, ...
0
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0answers
106 views

Asymmetry Term in the Semi-Empirical Mass Formula

Could someone explain to me in simple terms what the asymmetry term means and how it is derived. I don't really want a full fledged mathematical derivation, but more the basic principle and idea ...
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2answers
293 views

Why more Fe-56 than Ni-62 as fusion product in heavy stars?

Suppose we create an Fe-56 nucleus and an Ni-62 nucleus, each from individual protons and neutrons. In the case of Ni-62, more mass per nucleon is converted to binding energy. Thus we could argue the ...
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2answers
116 views

BINDING ENERGY OR BINDING ENERGY PER NEUCLEON REMAINS CONSTANT [duplicate]

Which one is constant BINDING ENERGY or BINDING ENERGY PER NEUCLEON? I GOT LOTS OF ANS. BUT I CAN`T UNDERSTAND. IS NEITHER OF THE IS CONSTANT?
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1answer
56 views

Protons and Neutrons Overshoot Actual Mass? [duplicate]

When I add up the mass of 6 protons and 6 neutrons in amu, I get a mass that is greater than the mass of carbon. I thought that it should be the other way around, because I have not including binding ...
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2answers
92 views

Semi-empirical mass formula

The mass formula is given by $M(Z,A) = ZM_{p}+(A-Z)M_{n}-a_{1}A+a_{2}A^\frac{2}{3}+a_{3}\frac{Z(Z-1)}{A^\frac{1}{3}}+a_{4}\frac{(Z-A/2)^2}{A}+a_{5}A^\frac{-1}{2}$ So I am just wondering here what ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Mass of an Atom

So the mass deficit of an atom, denoted by $\Delta M(Z,A)$, is given by the following formula, $\Delta M(Z,A) = M(Z,A) - Z(M_{p} + m_{e}) -NM_{n}$ However since the rest mass of an electron is a lot ...
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3answers
182 views

Binding Energy of an atom

I would like to know if there is any difference between the binding energy of a nucleus and the binding energy of an atom and what exactly do we mean when we say Binding energy per nucleon.. Edit to ...
1
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0answers
126 views

What is the difference between mass defect and mass deficit?

Is there any difference between the mass defect and the mass deficit? I have read that the mass defect of a nuclide is never negative and have also been told that the mass defect is the same as the ...
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2answers
300 views

Binding energy of Helium and repulsion of protons

I've just done an exercise of computing the binding energy of Helium 4, which is around 27,43 MeV. Obviously the binding energy "compensates" for the repulsion between the protons due to their ...
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0answers
165 views

Mirror nuclei: accounting for the difference in mass between nuclei

I was wondering if anyone here could guide me in the right direction with respect to the following problem: Two nuclei are considered mirror nuclei if interchanging the neutrons and protons turns ...
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2answers
191 views

The semi-empirical formula and $E=mc^2$

The semi-empirical formula is used to find the binding energy of a nucleus. But if you know the mass of a nucleus and the number of neutrons and protons that this nucleus consists of (and you know ...
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3answers
585 views

Why is the total energy of an orbiting system negative?

Assume it's an circular orbit. Object A orbits around object B. Take object B as frame of reference. .$E=KE_a + GPE$ .$E=\frac 12m_av_a^2 +(-\frac {GM_bm_A}r)$ .$E=\frac 12m_a(GM_br)+(-\frac ...
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2answers
60 views

The mass/energy of an $H$-atom and the gravitational force between it and another particle of mass $m$

The gravitational force between an $H$-atom and another particle of mass $m$ will be given by Newton's law: $$F=\frac{GMm}{r^2}$$ The question is, what is $M$ here? I thought the answer would be ...
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1answer
1k views

What's the difference between binding energy and separation energy?

My understanding of the two was as follows: the binding energy of a nucleus is, classically speaking, the energy needed to put together/take apart that nucleus completely (i.e. a measure of the strong ...
2
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3answers
316 views

Does energy conservation not hold in fission and fusion processes?

I have read that during fission and fusion processes, there is some kind of equilibrium between the single nucleus and the disintegration products, so they are constantly being converted into each ...
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1answer
87 views

Is it correct that whenever energy change, mass also change?

Can I simply claim that, according to the mass-energy equation $E=mc^2$, whenever the energy of an physical object (not necessarily a microcosmic one) changes, its mass also change? Okay, I ...
3
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2answers
150 views

Probability of fluorescence: matching of binding energy and incoming radiation energy?

Assume an X-ray diffractometer equipped with a copper anode X-ray tube. When a sample containing cobalt, iron, or manganese is irradiated by copper's K$\alpha_1$ radiation, sample fluorescence becomes ...
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0answers
46 views

Why is it inappropriate to calculate free energy change from end points alone?

In molecular dynamics, free energy changes are estimated using a variety of protocols to establish a path between the starting and ending states. The classic example is umbrella sampling in which a ...
2
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4answers
247 views

Mass Defect…cause and origin?

What makes it occur? How do the protons and nucleus know that they have to lose mass to produce energy...? And is the mass of a compressed Spring more than an uncompressed one?? does a body which has ...
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1answer
1k views

Difference between a hydrogen ion and a proton

I've run into a bit of a problem on this weeks coursework. A proton and an electron initially at rest combine to form hydrogen. Find the wavelength of the emitted photon? So, as far as I can ...
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2answers
376 views

Why are the dineutron and diproton unbound?

It is known that there is no diproton and dineutron nuclei. Does this mean that two protons or neutrons are not actually attracted to each other? Even if the attraction was weak, wouldn't it cause ...
4
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1answer
408 views

If virtual particles have negative mass why do they contribute positive mass to atoms?

According to Lawrence Krauss, atoms containing in our body consists of merely 10% (if I remember correctly) of our total mass. The rest come from virtual particles popping in and out of existence from ...
4
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2answers
153 views

Why is binding energy $\Delta mc^2$?

As we know the mass-energy equivalence relation $E=mc^2$ originally came from special relativity. And the binding energy is $\Delta mc^2$. How do we know that the extra mass coming from theoretical ...
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5answers
1k views

Why do almost all nuclear reactions release energy?

I'm just wondering why almost all nuclear reactions release energy, in a typical way, the mass defect is transformed into energy ? Is there a nuclear reaction that gains mass (resp. energy)? or most ...
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0answers
143 views

If the energy of an ant is smaller than an elephant, does that mean the ant is more stable than the elephant?

I know that when a system is in its lowest level of energy, it is most stable. However, what if system 1 has lower energy than system 2, does it keep meaning so? Or do we need to examine their binding ...
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4answers
618 views

About mass defect

Here's how my book explains mass defect: Particles inside the nucleus interact with each other - they feel attraction. The potential energy $U$ of such attraction is negative, because in absence ...