According to the current cosmological theories, it's the model that explains the early life of the universe, starting from a rapid expansion of hot and dense matter.

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If randomness doesn't exist, how come the universe isn't a perfect sphere with predictable distribution of matter?

I'm presuming that the scientific community pretty much agrees that randomness doesn't exits, and that everything has a cause. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I've heard of quantum mechanics, but as ...
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225 views

Is the universe expanding at a speed of almost $2c$?

I've been told nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. Therefore, from my vantage point the diameter of the universe is increasing at a rate of $2c$. Are there any flaws in my thinking?
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Age of the universe and the singularity at the Big Bang

Using the standard model of cosmology we calculate the Hubble time to obtain an estimate of the age of the universe. This model assumes a beginning of time in the past. But that point is a true ...
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188 views

Shouldn't LHC have used $p\bar{p}$ collisions, instead of $pp$ collisions, to study baryogenesis?

Baryogenesis is the physical process(es) that produced baryon antibaryon asymmetry in the early universe. That means, the laws that governed the bigbang was baryon-antibaryon symmetric. On the other ...
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Does entropy increase or decrease as our Universe is expanding?

Scientists say that entropy of our universe is increasing as it is expanding and our universe is cooling down gradually from the time of its birth. If something is getting cooler and cooler, then how ...
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Creation of matter in the big bang

I appreciate your patience to my neophyte question. I am working on my dissertation in philosophy (which has nothing or little to do with physics) about the "problem of naming." Briefly what I am ...
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208 views

Infinite number of galaxies?

I understand that the current estimate for the number of galaxies in the observable universe is about 100-200 billion. Is there anything in our understanding of physics and the evolution of the ...
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114 views

Hydrogen cloud at the universe's beginning?

What prevented all of the hydrogen at the universe's start from coalescing into one gigantic star?
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184 views

Could there be more universes?

In the documentary: "Curiosity - Did God Create the Universe (on YouTube)", theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking states that time did not exist before the big bang. The first ...
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188 views

How does the Cosmic Microwave Background give us information about the Big Bang?

I was reading about CMB after this new breakthrough last week and I could not figure this out. The CMB did not exist before the epoch of Last Scattering. They were just photons which were formed at ...
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Proportion of dark matter/energy to other matters/energy at the beginning of the universe?

What was the proportion of dark matter/energy to other matters/energy at the moments after the beginning of the universe (standard Big Bang model)?
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163 views

Open Big Bang-less universe?

This came up in discussion around a class I'm taking. For a Universe with $\Lambda$ and matter contributions to energy density (and implicitly curvature, but no radiation), can you have a universe ...
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Is “A Brief History of Time” still up to date?

I have recently found my copy of Hawkings' A Brief History of Time which I have never finished. This time I'm determined to read it all the way through. However, the book is now almost 25 years old. ...
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Light years and redshift from our point of view. How can we see it?

So I was reading about GN-108036 this morning and for some reason I thought of something which I can't quite wrap my head around and make sense of. It's early morning so maybe coffee hasn't kicked in ...
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131 views

When they say the universe was the size of a baseball about a billion billion billion billionth of a second

after the big bang. Does that means the observable universe was the size of a baseball, or does it mean the entire universe? I'm guessing it means the observable universe - as we really don't ...
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Qualtitative explanation for the link between low magnitude of high z supernova and accelerated expansion

Is there any explanation on a qualitative level why we can see in the observed magnitude vs. redshift z plot that the universe is expanding accelerated? See for example here: ...
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Does the expansion of the universe soon after the Big Bang affect the amount of time that light takes to reach us?

If faster than light travel is impossible, how is it that light emitted from matter so close together in the time soon after the Big Bang is only now just reaching us? I would assume that there would ...
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87 views

Could false vacuums potentially describe, in part, the Big Bang?

I've just read about something I had never of before, false vacuums. After reading a couple descriptions of what a drop (or rather, a vacuum metastability event) would imply, I thought of the Big ...
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Frame of reference and big bang

I have read Brief History of Time in which he has wonderfully described the formation of universe. What is the frame of reference from which we are viewing the big bang? What is the frame of reference ...
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What would we observe as background on the sky if the big bang had never occurred?

The data we've received so far from satellites such as WMAP paints a near uniform distribution in intensity of the background radiation that we take as evidence that our universe had an origin, and ...
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Conservation of Energy in the Universe [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is energy really conserved? Why can’t energy be created or destroyed? One of the laws of the universe that dazzles me the most is the law of conservation of energy. I ...
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431 views

Has anyone ever tried to formulate physics based on computer science or information processing?

Some physicists and university researchers say it's possible to test the theory that our entire universe exists inside a computer simulation, like in the 1999 film "The Matrix." In 2003, University ...
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437 views

Universe being flat and why we can't see or access the space “behind” our universe plane?

I'm a layman, but i watched some intereting videos about big bang on youtube[michio kaku, hawking this kind of things, not some crackpots :)] I described everything on my picture: So is there ...
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Big Bang and Cosmic microwave background radiation?

One of the experimental evidence that supports the theory of big bang is cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). From what I've read is that CMBR is the left over radiation from an early stage ...
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340 views

Is there an exact formal definition of the Universe?

I've read several articles about Observable universe, Universe and Hubble volume, including Wikipedia articles and other references. After this I wondered: Is there a formal, rigorous definition in ...
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What is the origin of CMB fluctuations?

I have read somewhere that CMB (cosmic microwave background radiation) fluctuations in temperature are linked to mass distribution fluctuations in the early universe (at ~350000 years after Big Bang, ...
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Excluding big bang itself, does spacetime have a boundary?

My understanding of big bang cosmology and General Relativity is that both matter and spacetime emerged together (I'm not considering time zero where there was a singularity). Does this mean that ...
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572 views

Total momentum of the Universe

What is the total momentum of the whole Universe in reference to the point in space where the Big Bang took place? According to my reasoning (and a bit elementary knowledge) it should be exactly ...
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783 views

Universe Expansion as an absolute time reference

Why we call "constant" to the Hubble constant?, if the universe were really expanding then the Hubble "constant" should change, being variable, smaller and smaller..with "time". Other example/view ...
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179 views

The first $10^{-35}$ seconds [closed]

I am a rank amateur, so please forgive me if the answer to this is well-known. The following quote can in a weekly update for an EdX course I am following in astrophysics: "And what a week it's ...
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216 views

How fast did hydrogen atoms travel when they were first formed in the early universe?

I can't seem to find any data on this, is it a known value?
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87 views

Quantum Wavefunctions Without Space

A handful of physicists have a rather peculiar definition of 'nothing' in terms of cosmology. Their claim is that the Universe, assuming it has 0 total energy, could have arisen from nothing but ...
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165 views

Many times speed of light [duplicate]

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/24/theory-of-everything-big-bang-discovery_n_5019126.html What does "many times speed of light" really mean in this context? For a layman it's easy to draw wrong ...
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Approximation of the energy for low $T$ in the early universe

In Perkins `Particle Physics', to compute the baryon-antibaryon-ratio, he uses that for $Mc^2\gg kT$: $$E= Mc^2 + \frac{p^2c^2}{2m}.$$ I realize that the approximation comes from $E^2=M^2c^4 + p^2c^2$ ...
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How is it possible to come to a conclusion that Universe is a result of the Big Bang while we aren't able to observe the entire Universe?

-I'm not a religious person so this is not a denial. I'm just trying to understand the most fundamental topic about Universe. -I know the Big Bang cosmological model is not a law but it's a theory. ...
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Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today?

Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today? Planck's constant : $$h= 6.626068 × 10^{-34}\, m^2 kg / s,$$ $$E=n.h.\nu,$$ $$\epsilon=h.\nu$$
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What did Hawking mean? 'Time started at the big bang'. Book suggestions please [closed]

After writing down this question, I have come to realize that. What I really want is reading materials on the questions below. Before the big bang there was no such thing as 'time' (Steven Hawking on ...
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77 views

Why is the gravitational constant.. constant? [duplicate]

Many scientists have now come to the conclusion that a big bang might not explain the 'start' of the universe and are coming up with alternatives. Could it be that gravity is dependent on the ...
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134 views

Does the second law of thermodynamics imply a spacetime beginning of the universe?

Recently I have been studying thermodynamics and I noticed a article by a religious person which says that the second law of thermodynamics proves that the universe had a beginning. A spacetime one. ...
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246 views

Would time dilation be too great for the early universe to expand?

I read that one second after the big bang the universe was composed of photons electrons and neutrinos. Wouldn't the density of energy/matter have caused such extreme time dilation that the universe ...
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Current string-theory version of Big Bang

I always wondered what the description of Big Bang would be like in string theory. How is it different from QFT version of Big Bang? Thanks.
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Could Hyper-Massive Black Holes be due to Dark Matter in the Early Universe?

An interesting discussion started here: Is there a limit as to how fast a black hole can grow? I am curious if Thompson Scattering and Eddington Luminosity have the same effect on Dark Matter (or ...
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Could the singularity that gave rise to our universe be past-eternal?

Are there any compelling models that include a past eternal singularity that ultimately gave rise to our universe? Does the "no-boundary" hypothesis that utilizes imaginary time have past eternal ...
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166 views

If we say the universe is expanding, shouldn't it be expanding relative to something?

I don't understand, if everything in this world is relative to something else, then cannot we essentially say that nothing exists independently? We say that the universe is considered to be the ...
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748 views

Origin of motion and relative speed of bodies in the universe

Charged particles can hit the earth at relativistic speeds. But it seems that all large bodies have fairly low relative speed. Of course, speed can increase considerably when a body orbits close to a ...
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How was the universe created?

I do not know much beyond high school Physics. Thus, I am asking this question from almost layman's perspective: What, as per the best of our existing knowledge and widely accepted among the ...
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Obtaining a copy of Hawking's Ph.D thesis - Properties of Expanding Universes

Due to its popularity, I am interested to know the 4 chapter titles and topics covered in S.W. Hawking Ph.D, Properties of Expanding Universes. I also ask this because that thesis is hardly available. ...
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465 views

How does inflation relate to spontaneous matter creation?

According to Inflation for Beginners, ... quantum physics allows the entire Universe to appear, in this supercompact form, out of nothing at all, as a cosmic free lunch. The idea that the Universe ...
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Hot Big Bang vs. Big Bang

This should hopefully be a quick one. Is there any difference between the Big Bang Theory and the Hot Big Bang Theory? Around Cambridge I hear everyone using "Hot Big Bang Theory", for example ther ...
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Does Big Bang Cosmology imply/require infinite space?

The reason I am asking this question is because if all points in space observe recession of galaxies the same as we do from Earth, the universe would have to be infinite (or a closed sphere in 4D or ...