According to the current cosmological theories, it's the model that explains the early life of the universe, starting from a rapid expansion of hot and dense matter.

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Quantum entanglement and the big bang

Prior to the Big Bang all matter was compressed into a point of high density. Why isn't all matter already entangled?
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Additional merits to Wetterich's “Universe without expansion” compared to standard cosmological redshift interpretation?

A recent news item in Nature promotes Wetterich's preprint "A Universe without expansion". All sounds very exciting but hard to judge for non-experts. As I understand from the Nature's article, the ...
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Which came first, movement or heat?

According to my measly understanding of the universe, when particles hit one another, some of their kinetic energy is transformed into heat. But when we heat particles (for instance, putting a bucket ...
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Why didn't a black hole form right after the Big Bang? [duplicate]

Why didn't a black hole form right after the Big Bang and the universe contract towards a singularity?
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If randomness doesn't exist, how come the universe isn't a perfect sphere with predictable distribution of matter?

I'm presuming that the scientific community pretty much agrees that randomness doesn't exits, and that everything has a cause. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I've heard of quantum mechanics, but as ...
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Is the universe expanding at a speed of almost $2c$?

I've been told nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. Therefore, from my vantage point the diameter of the universe is increasing at a rate of $2c$. Are there any flaws in my thinking?
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Is it possible that dark-matter is composed of a large number of neutrinos from the big bang? [duplicate]

They seem to have all the properties of dark-matter (massive, with no electromagnetic interaction). Could it be that many of the neutrinos produced since the big bang have formed massive neutrino ...
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What is the difference between the Big Bang Model and the Λ-CDM Model?

If I'm going to write about "The Consensus Model of Cosmology" should I include Big Bang Model or should I go with just the $\Lambda$-CDM Model?
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Age of the universe and the singularity at the Big Bang

Using the standard model of cosmology we calculate the Hubble time to obtain an estimate of the age of the universe. This model assumes a beginning of time in the past. But that point is a true ...
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Shouldn't LHC have used $p\bar{p}$ collisions, instead of $pp$ collisions, to study baryogenesis?

Baryogenesis is the physical process(es) that produced baryon antibaryon asymmetry in the early universe. That means, the laws that governed the bigbang was baryon-antibaryon symmetric. On the other ...
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Does entropy increase or decrease as our Universe is expanding?

Scientists say that entropy of our universe is increasing as it is expanding and our universe is cooling down gradually from the time of its birth. If something is getting cooler and cooler, then how ...
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Creation of matter in the big bang

I appreciate your patience to my neophyte question. I am working on my dissertation in philosophy (which has nothing or little to do with physics) about the "problem of naming." Briefly what I am ...
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242 views

Infinite number of galaxies?

I understand that the current estimate for the number of galaxies in the observable universe is about 100-200 billion. Is there anything in our understanding of physics and the evolution of the ...
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Hydrogen cloud at the universe's beginning?

What prevented all of the hydrogen at the universe's start from coalescing into one gigantic star?
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Could there be more universes?

In the documentary: "Curiosity - Did God Create the Universe (on YouTube)", theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking states that time did not exist before the big bang. The first ...
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How does the Cosmic Microwave Background give us information about the Big Bang?

I was reading about CMB after this new breakthrough last week and I could not figure this out. The CMB did not exist before the epoch of Last Scattering. They were just photons which were formed at ...
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Proportion of dark matter/energy to other matters/energy at the beginning of the universe?

What was the proportion of dark matter/energy to other matters/energy at the moments after the beginning of the universe (standard Big Bang model)?
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Open Big Bang-less universe?

This came up in discussion around a class I'm taking. For a Universe with $\Lambda$ and matter contributions to energy density (and implicitly curvature, but no radiation), can you have a universe ...
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Is “A Brief History of Time” still up to date?

I have recently found my copy of Hawkings' A Brief History of Time which I have never finished. This time I'm determined to read it all the way through. However, the book is now almost 25 years old. ...
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Light years and redshift from our point of view. How can we see it?

So I was reading about GN-108036 this morning and for some reason I thought of something which I can't quite wrap my head around and make sense of. It's early morning so maybe coffee hasn't kicked in ...
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How did gravity exist before mass?

I'm brushing up on my Big Bang, and I noticed that, apparently, although gravity is the first force to split from the original "superforce", mass does not appear on the scene until after the second ...
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The naive idea of the big bang

Many people think that according to big bang cosmology, first there was empty space, then there was an explosion in the middle of the emptiness, and now all the galaxies are flying away from that ...
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When they say the universe was the size of a baseball about a billion billion billion billionth of a second

after the big bang. Does that means the observable universe was the size of a baseball, or does it mean the entire universe? I'm guessing it means the observable universe - as we really don't ...
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Hot Big Bang vs. Big Bang

This should hopefully be a quick one. Is there any difference between the Big Bang Theory and the Hot Big Bang Theory? Around Cambridge I hear everyone using "Hot Big Bang Theory", for example ther ...
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Qualtitative explanation for the link between low magnitude of high z supernova and accelerated expansion

Is there any explanation on a qualitative level why we can see in the observed magnitude vs. redshift z plot that the universe is expanding accelerated? See for example here: ...
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Does the expansion of the universe soon after the Big Bang affect the amount of time that light takes to reach us?

If faster than light travel is impossible, how is it that light emitted from matter so close together in the time soon after the Big Bang is only now just reaching us? I would assume that there would ...
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Could false vacuums potentially describe, in part, the Big Bang?

I've just read about something I had never of before, false vacuums. After reading a couple descriptions of what a drop (or rather, a vacuum metastability event) would imply, I thought of the Big ...
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Frame of reference and big bang

I have read Brief History of Time in which he has wonderfully described the formation of universe. What is the frame of reference from which we are viewing the big bang? What is the frame of reference ...
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What would we observe as background on the sky if the big bang had never occurred?

The data we've received so far from satellites such as WMAP paints a near uniform distribution in intensity of the background radiation that we take as evidence that our universe had an origin, and ...
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Conservation of Energy in the Universe [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is energy really conserved? Why can’t energy be created or destroyed? One of the laws of the universe that dazzles me the most is the law of conservation of energy. I ...
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Is the universe bounded?

As I understand it nobody can pinpoint an objective "center" of the universe nor "where" the Big Bang happened. It seems the observable universe is limited by our event horizon at some 14 billion ...
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Has anyone ever tried to formulate physics based on computer science or information processing?

Some physicists and university researchers say it's possible to test the theory that our entire universe exists inside a computer simulation, like in the 1999 film "The Matrix." In 2003, University ...
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Universe being flat and why we can't see or access the space “behind” our universe plane?

I'm a layman, but i watched some intereting videos about big bang on youtube[michio kaku, hawking this kind of things, not some crackpots :)] I described everything on my picture: So is there ...
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Big Bang and Cosmic microwave background radiation?

One of the experimental evidence that supports the theory of big bang is cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). From what I've read is that CMBR is the left over radiation from an early stage ...
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Is there an exact formal definition of the Universe?

I've read several articles about Observable universe, Universe and Hubble volume, including Wikipedia articles and other references. After this I wondered: Is there a formal, rigorous definition in ...
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What is the origin of CMB fluctuations?

I have read somewhere that CMB (cosmic microwave background radiation) fluctuations in temperature are linked to mass distribution fluctuations in the early universe (at ~350000 years after Big Bang, ...
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Excluding big bang itself, does spacetime have a boundary?

My understanding of big bang cosmology and General Relativity is that both matter and spacetime emerged together (I'm not considering time zero where there was a singularity). Does this mean that ...
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In the big crunch theory, when the big crunch singularity forms, can the resulting black hole decay through hawking's radiation?

I've been pondering about this and I couldn't really find the answer for this. The big crunch theory postulates that the universe will eventually stop expanding and reverse back in on its self into a ...
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Total momentum of the Universe

What is the total momentum of the whole Universe in reference to the point in space where the Big Bang took place? According to my reasoning (and a bit elementary knowledge) it should be exactly ...
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Universe Expansion as an absolute time reference

Why we call "constant" to the Hubble constant?, if the universe were really expanding then the Hubble "constant" should change, being variable, smaller and smaller..with "time". Other example/view ...
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Has the universe we live in started as a black hole that is imploding?

As discussed in this question, as far back as the 1960s it was suggested that the Schwarzschild metric can be smoothly joined to a de Sitter metric. For example the idea has been used by Lee Smolin in ...
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181 views

The first $10^{-35}$ seconds [closed]

I am a rank amateur, so please forgive me if the answer to this is well-known. The following quote can in a weekly update for an EdX course I am following in astrophysics: "And what a week it's ...
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How fast did hydrogen atoms travel when they were first formed in the early universe?

I can't seem to find any data on this, is it a known value?
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How is it possible to come to a conclusion that Universe is a result of the Big Bang while we aren't able to observe the entire Universe?

-I'm not a religious person so this is not a denial. I'm just trying to understand the most fundamental topic about Universe. -I know the Big Bang cosmological model is not a law but it's a theory. ...
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Hydrogen in a glass of water

One of the great Sagan quotes is that we are made of star stuff - meaning the atoms in our bodies were formed from stellar nucleosynthesis. However, what about the hydrogen in a glass of water? Would ...
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Quantum Wavefunctions Without Space

A handful of physicists have a rather peculiar definition of 'nothing' in terms of cosmology. Their claim is that the Universe, assuming it has 0 total energy, could have arisen from nothing but ...
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Many times speed of light [duplicate]

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/24/theory-of-everything-big-bang-discovery_n_5019126.html What does "many times speed of light" really mean in this context? For a layman it's easy to draw wrong ...
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Approximation of the energy for low $T$ in the early universe

In Perkins `Particle Physics', to compute the baryon-antibaryon-ratio, he uses that for $Mc^2\gg kT$: $$E= Mc^2 + \frac{p^2c^2}{2m}.$$ I realize that the approximation comes from $E^2=M^2c^4 + p^2c^2$ ...
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Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today?

Was Planck's constant $h$ the same when the Big Bang happened as it is today? Planck's constant : $$h= 6.626068 × 10^{-34}\, m^2 kg / s,$$ $$E=n.h.\nu,$$ $$\epsilon=h.\nu$$
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What did Hawking mean? 'Time started at the big bang'. Book suggestions please [closed]

After writing down this question, I have come to realize that. What I really want is reading materials on the questions below. Before the big bang there was no such thing as 'time' (Steven Hawking on ...