2
votes
1answer
52 views

Why is the graph of CMB/black-body radiation asymptotic?

Speaking of this graph of blackbody radiation, I see that the graph goes to 0 asymptotically: As we go to higher and higher frequencies, the energy of a single photon becomes increasingly high. ...
3
votes
2answers
473 views

What trajectory has the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation taken to get to earth?

I have a few related questions: Where is the CMB coming (emitted/reflected/remitted) from? When CMB hits the earth, is that the first thing those photons hit since they were emitted 400 thousand ...
7
votes
1answer
176 views

Seeing beyond the CMBR with neutrinos?

As I understand it, you can't see beyond the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation because the plasma of the early universe was opaque to electromagnetic radiation. What if you had a "neutrino ...
6
votes
2answers
115 views

When was the cosmic background radiation in the visible spectrum?

From what I understand about the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is that it was from the big bang, and since space has streched and become bigger since then the wavelength of the CMBR has ...
4
votes
1answer
137 views

How does the Cosmic Microwave Background give us information about the Big Bang?

I was reading about CMB after this new breakthrough last week and I could not figure this out. The CMB did not exist before the epoch of Last Scattering. They were just photons which were formed at ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Immediately after the Big Bang, was the universe in a state of extremely low or extremely high entropy?

Phase space theory suggests that the largest course-graining region, $p$, in a phase space, $P$, is the point in the phase space with the highest entropy. As such, it is in thermal equilibrium with ...
1
vote
1answer
84 views

The gravity waves from the big bang? How can we know?

The latest news says that scientists detected gravitational waves from the Big Bang. My question is how do they know the waves originated in the big bang verses any number of supernovae and or ...
3
votes
0answers
55 views

Connection between BAO und CMB Spectrum

I have a problem understanding the connection between the accoustic peaks in the CMB spectrum and the baryon oscillation picture. On the one hand it is stated, that the odd accoustic peaks (1,3,5..) ...
2
votes
2answers
143 views

Could there have been two “Big Bangs”?

A couple of years ago, I remember seeing a documentary on the big bang theory. The theory presented was that to explain the cosmic microwave background radiation, there needed to have been two big ...
1
vote
1answer
281 views

How far away is Cosmic Background Radiation? [duplicate]

I've been reading about Cosmic Background Radiation (CMBR) lately. My understanding so far is that this is the "Noise"/"Flash" from the big bang. Assuming that information is correct, how far away ...
0
votes
2answers
82 views

Spread and direction of the cosmic background radiation

Something I can never understand is that where the cosmic background radiation spreads? If I know well, the cosmic background radiation is actually the light of the Big Bang. If it happened exactly ...
7
votes
3answers
332 views

Where does the light of the Big Bang come from?

I'm wondering whether the residual light of the Big Bang comes from one particular direction and what possibilities do we have to detect its position?
3
votes
2answers
361 views

Big Bang and Cosmic microwave background radiation?

One of the experimental evidence that supports the theory of big bang is cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). From what I've read is that CMBR is the left over radiation from an early stage ...
5
votes
4answers
213 views

Why is there still radiation left from the Big Bang now? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why can we see the cosmic microwave background (CMB)? We all have seen evidence of radiation left from the Big Bang, but how is it still detectable? Why didn't it ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Why can we see the cosmic microwave background (CMB)?

I understand that we can never see much farther than the farthest galaxies we have observed. This is because, before the first galaxies formed, the universe was opaque--it was a soup of subatomic ...