1
vote
2answers
123 views

Why are results of Bell's experiments considered to “break realism”?

Related to my previous question (Why would classical correlation in Bell's experiment be a linear function of angle?), as a newbie in quantum mechanics, I am also unable to find the reason to why ...
4
votes
2answers
79 views

Why would classical correlation in Bell's experiment be a linear function of angle?

Sorry if it's a newbie question, but I have trouble understanding the following part in the Wikipedia's explanation for the Bell's theorem: With the measurements oriented at intermediate angles ...
7
votes
2answers
468 views

Bells Theorem for Dummies, How does it work?

I've been reading up on theoretical physics for a few years now and I feel like I am starting to get an understanding of particle physics, at least as much as you can from Wikipedia pages. One thing ...
10
votes
1answer
377 views

Why can't I use Bell's Theorem for faster than light communication?

I read this description of Bell's theorem. I understand he's restating it slightly, so there may be incorrect assumptions there, or I may have some. I think Bell's theorem should lead to FTL ...
4
votes
2answers
180 views

On Bell inequality and bound entangled states

I have recently seen some presentation slides of Michał Horodecki (slide number 77) in which he discussed the following conjecture. Bound entangled states satisfy all Bell inequalities The ...
3
votes
1answer
263 views

Measuring Entangled Qubits

Suppose we have a pair of entangled qubits. $$ |\psi\rangle = \frac{1}{ \sqrt{2} } ( |00\rangle + |11\rangle ) $$ Now we give one qubit to Alice and other to Bob. Alice measure the her qubit to ...
6
votes
2answers
368 views

Show quantum entanglement to a classical thinker

Can someone describe a simple experiment to convince a person thinking about physics classically (called Claus) that quantum mechanics has something weird, entangled? I mean an experiment that he ...
3
votes
2answers
767 views

Can cellular automata be reconcilied with quantum mechanics?

CAs are deterministic representations of the universe, which, according to the Bell's inequality are not entirely accurate. Cells interact "locally" (only with the closest neighbours), while quantum ...