A nucleus made of protons and neutrons surrounded by a cloud of electrons equal in number to the protons.

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On the atomic level, how is incandescent light structured?

I want to know from the smallest possible originating structures how the light I see generated from heat is made by atoms themselves.
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1answer
102 views

An electron emits a photon and the core is pushed (recoiled) back!

I have come across a problem which is a homework indeed, but i tried to pack this question up so that it is more theoretical. What I want to know is: If I am allowed to write energy conservation for ...
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2answers
137 views

Weird definition of Bohr radius on Wiki

On the Wikipedia I found that the Bohr radius is equal to: \begin{align} \boxed{r_b=\dfrac{4\pi\varepsilon_0\hbar^2}{m_e{e}^2}} \end{align} but while we have been learning Bohr's model we derived ...
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1answer
242 views

Why electron clouds in atoms don't radiate? [duplicate]

I was reading that Bohr assumed electrons in orbit simply did not radiate, and my professor told me that the actual case is that electrons are clouds of probability. Even so, aren't they still moving ...
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2answers
143 views

classical understanding of an atom [duplicate]

A problem in Bohr's day was understanding why an orbiting electron does not continuously radiate an EM field. An orbiting electron is a moving charge and according to Maxwell, this should generate an ...
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1answer
966 views

What is heat and how does it effect an atom?

What happens in the atom when it gets heated or cooled and turns into gas, liquid or solid? I just want to know how does heat affect an atom.
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1answer
352 views

Alpha decay, why does it occur? [duplicate]

I was reading about alpha decay and why it happens. The strong force holds protons and neutrons together, but I don't get why does an atom emit helium nucleus when it has too many ...
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0answers
64 views

What is the physical property of metal nanoparticles?

I am a Math student but now I have to deal with gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Now I was wondering whether the physical properties of gold nanoparticles are the same as the properties of gold ...
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1answer
89 views

How does adding electrons break the angular momentum degeneracy?

In the hydrogen atom, the energy does not depend on l. This degeneracy is sometimes called "accidental" (because it does not correspond to some symmetry?). However, there is l dependence in the energy ...
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1answer
435 views

Why an electron “rotate” around the nucleus at a speed close to the light one? [closed]

Why an electron "rotate" around the nucleus at a speed close to the light one? I mean where he gets all this energy? One DOES NOT simply approach the speed of light AFAIK.
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1answer
204 views

home made atom destruction unit [closed]

Today we learnt at school that atoms can be destructed. I believe Physics is a great science to do experiment and I would like to try it at home. Could you tell me what I need to do it? and is it ...
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1answer
192 views

Atomic gravitational field?

This might be a silly question, but if every atom has its own gravitational force could atoms or molecules be attracted to each other over vast distances in the void of space if there were no other ...
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1answer
197 views

How to determine the region that would contain a quantum particle

(a) A hydrogen atom is in its ground state. If space is divided into identical infinitesimal cubes, in which cube is the electron most likely to be found? If instead space is divided into 31 ...
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1answer
96 views

Could one “build” elements?

I was wondering this: would it be possible to "construct" elements by arranging their constituent particles in high-energy environments? So apart from just fusion, could you sub-atomically manufacture ...
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0answers
100 views

Total angular momentum in multielectron atoms

I have some confusion about orbitals in multielectron atoms. Let's say we consider an atom (Lithium, for example, $1s^2\, 2p^1$) and that the state of the last electron is [n=2, l=1, ml=0, s=1/2, ...
4
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1answer
272 views

How can we describe the electrons of multi-electron atoms (i.e. not Hydrogen) when equations/analytic solutions only exist for Hydrogen?

I've been digging into emission spectra of different elements and found that such things as the Rydberg equation, Bohr's model, and quantum mechanics can only fully describe the single electron in the ...
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8answers
2k views

Where did Schrödinger solve the radiating problem of Bohr's model?

One of the problems with Bohr's theory to describe the hydrogen atom, was that the electron orbiting around the nucleus has an acceleration. Therefore it radiates and loses energy, until it would ...
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1answer
767 views

Energy required for ionizing Helium

The energy required to remove both electrons from the helium atom in its ground state is 79.0 eV. How much energy is required to ionize helium (i.e., to remove one electron)? ...
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2answers
119 views

How does one subtract two light beams?

From what I understand, it seems like you can only "add" beams together. You can use a beam combiner, basically using a beam splitter in reverse, to combine two beams. In homodyne detection, you use a ...
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1answer
440 views

Dark and bright areas around atoms in a scanning tunnelling microscope image

Recently IBM created world’s smallest ever animation on an atomic scale video. Researchers made the animation using a scanning tunnelling microscope to move thousands of carbon monoxide molecules to ...
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1answer
321 views

Difference between atom and elementary particle questioned

Hydrogen ion doesn't have one electron which clearly mean that it has only one proton..So hydrogen ion is only a proton. Am I right, please make it clear. If hydrogen ion and proton are same that how ...
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1answer
102 views

Atoms in our body

Our body of course exchanges some atoms with environment every day however are there some of atoms which stay with us a life time?
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1answer
141 views

How fast did hydrogen atoms travel when they were first formed in the early universe?

I can't seem to find any data on this, is it a known value?
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0answers
35 views

Electron Configuration and Binding [closed]

Boron with an electron configuration of $1s^22s^22p^1$ has an atomic weight of $10.811u$. What is the total binding energy for 11Bs if $Mn = 1.008665u$ and $Mp = 1.007825u$. I cannot find anything ...
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538 views

Graphene +1 extra carbon bond

I'm not a physicist just a curious mind, so please go easy! I was just watching a BBC Horizon Documentary that featured a piece on the recently discovered material Graphene. One of the facts ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Minimum atomic clearance permitting motion

Suppose you were to build the piston and cylinder in a car engine atom-by-atom. Let's just say carbon, since you can make a lot of different shapes due to it's high valence. So assuming you make the ...
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1answer
468 views

What is longitudinal relaxation time and transverse relaxation time? [closed]

How do we define the longitudinal relaxation time and transverse relaxation time?
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1answer
2k views

How electrons act under rotating magnetic field?

I study Power Engineering in University. Today I asked my lecturer to explain me exactly how atom's electrons act under spinning rotor's magnetic field, that generated dynamic electricity. But he even ...
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0answers
77 views

How large must the Quantum teleportation fidelity have to be in order for it to be useful?

This question relates and stems from my original question. Please read this one and the comments before answering this question. Quantum Teleportation Fidelity I know that for discrete variables ...
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1answer
2k views

Why is carbon dating limit only 40,000 years?

For an example, when they tried to get the carbon dating for presence of Aboriginal people in Australia they get to the number 40,000. But it could be much earlier. Why is that 40,000 years limit for ...
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2answers
205 views

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere?

Why is electron presented in books, pictures as a sphere, when in fact it's not?
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2answers
3k views

The number of degrees of freedom of a monatomic gas

Suppose that I have a monatomic gas sample consisting of $N$ atoms (e.g., $N$ argon atoms); thus there are no vibrations or rotations. How many degrees of freedom does the system have? Does the ...
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142 views

why is the transition $3p^53d^2 \to 3p^63d^1$ (hydrogen atom) forbidden?

What I was thinking is that in 3d subshell (l=2) we have two electrons with $$m_l=-2$$ (spin up and down) and if we move to 3p we will fill the last vacant position - that is $$m_l=1$$ with spin down ...
34
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3answers
2k views

Can the solar system really fit in a thimble?

Almost every time somebody talks about atoms, at some point they mention something like this: If we remove the spaces between the atoms and atomic components, we can fit the solar system in a ...
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5answers
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How can the nucleus of an atom be in an excited state?

An example of the nucleus of an atom being in an excited state is the Hoyle State, which was a theory devised by the Astronomer Fred Hoyle to help describe the vast quantities of carbon-12 present in ...
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0answers
53 views

Where do electrons get the energy to remain in orbit? [duplicate]

As we know electrons continuously revolve around the nuclus without falling in it at a high velocity beating it's force of attraction. My question is where do electrons get energy to revolve around ...
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2answers
104 views

Quantum yield and spontaneous decay

I'm trying to figure out how many atoms are decaying spontaneously in a span of 2 seconds. Let's say that the quantum yield is 0.45, and that the lifetime "τ" (tau) is 10 microseconds. Then I found ...
2
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0answers
79 views

Where to find probability density plots for all elements?

Does anyone know where I can find something similar to this, but for all elements? I would love to find something with the same image quality. Also, is there any software that can produce images ...
2
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1answer
162 views

How is energy transferred between atoms in a collision?

Consider two bare protons. One (A) is stationary (relative to some arbitrary massless observer); the other (B) is approaching A at 1 m/s. When they collide, I assume that they bounce. What is the ...
2
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1answer
211 views

Why do some liquid metals have anomalously-high surface tension/heat of vaporization ratios?

In a didactic article, Victor Weisskopf estimated the size of molecules in a liquid from measurements of their surface tension and heat of vaporization. If atoms are exceedingly small, then only a ...
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2answers
189 views

Does hidden variable quantum mechanics imply the collapse of atoms(electrons falling into the nucleus)?

why do atoms not collapse on themselves. Doesnt this problem rule hidden variables as invalid as the heisenburg uncertainty is the solution to the problem because it says electrons exist in a ...
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3answers
255 views

Do electrons in multi-electron atoms really have definite angular momenta?

Since the mutual repulsion term between electrons orbiting the same nucleus does not commute with either electron's angular momentum operator (but only with their sum), I'd assume that the electrons ...
6
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2answers
386 views

Do the energy levels of electron orbitals change relativistically?

When an electron emits a photon from changing energy levels, the frequency of the photon depends on the difference between the energy levels. But if someone is moving with respect to the atom, the ...
4
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2answers
6k views

What exists in the Space between atoms

Apologies to all if this has been asked before, I searched but was unable to find one similar. This is a question that has been bugging me for a while that i haven't really been able to find a ...
3
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1answer
73 views

What methods exist for us to measure the position and momentum of atoms that make up molecules?

In this paper, Localization of an atom by homodyne measurement. A. M. Herkommer et al. Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 8 no. 1, p. 189 (1996) (paywalled). the authors are able to localize atoms using ...
2
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1answer
109 views

Is the spin state of an atom related to the polarization of the photon it spontaneously emits?

From literature I've been reading, I find that scientists are able to "map" atomic states onto photon states. Are they talking about spin states and corresponding photon polarization states? Can ...
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1answer
440 views

Elastic collisions in Franck-Hertz experiment

Looking at a Franck-Hertz experimental setup, and given a potential difference such as $4.0\ V$ which is too small to excite out the first electron orbital, the electrons moving through the tube will ...
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3answers
1k views

What does a subatomic charge actually mean?

I was recently reading a popular science book called The Canon - The Beautiful Basics of Science by Natalie Angier, and it talks about subatomic particles like protons, neutrons and electrons in ...
2
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1answer
390 views

Explanation on Atomic Orbitals and Molecular Orbitals

We were reading about atomic structures and bond making and my teacher told me that when two atoms are fused or when they make bond, two orbitals are formed. 1-Bonding Molecular Orbital & 2- ...
2
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1answer
408 views

What is the spatial mode of light or the spatial mode of a massive particle?

I'm extremely confused by what physicists mean by the spatial mode of light. I am also equally if not more confused by what the spatial mode of a massive particle is. Can anyone help me out by ...