Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus. It is primarily concerned with the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus and the processes by which these arrangements change. This includes ions as well as neutral atoms and, ...

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Hydrogen 2p3/2 -> 1s1/2 transition polarisation and angular distribution

Could you please help me. I have to calculate the intensity angular and polarisation distribution in hydrogen electric dipole transition $\text{2p}_{3/2}\rightarrow \text{1s}_{1/2}$. To do this I ...
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120 views

Charge on the remaining atom after Alpha decay

In radioactive alpha decay, a helium atom is shown to be released. However, I was told that only thing released is a helium nucleus. If so, then it should leave two of its electrons in the atom ...
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Why are most metals gray/silver?

Why do most metals (iron, tin, aluminum, lead, zinc, tungsten, nickel, etc.) appear silver or gray in color? (What atomic characteristics determine the color?) What makes copper and gold have ...
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103 views

Thermionic emission, delayed emission and predissociation

In molecular photodissociation, the thermionic emission, delayed emission and predissociation are the same? Otherwise, what is the difference between them? My question is not about the solids, but I ...
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118 views

Why are the quantum numbers $n$ and $\ell$ denoted with those letters?

We have 4 quantum numbers: principal, azimuthal, magnetic and spin (denoted $n$, $\ell$, $m$ and $s$ respectively). I assume $m$ and $s$ are simply the initials of 'magnetic' and 'spin'. Is there any ...
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54 views

How does exciting an electron's surrounding electromagnetic field cause 'electron excitation'?

In more meaningful words than the ones above, how does adding energy to the EM field cause the electron to to change orbitals or oscillate in a different pattern.
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37 views

Magnetic quantum numbers - axes correspondence

We know that the magnetic quantum number describes the space orientation of an orbital within an atom. For the $p$-orbital, the magnetic quantum numbers can be -1,0,1 (one for every axis). We have ...
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3answers
108 views

Do electrons pop into and out of existence around the nucleus of an atom?

What surrounds the nucleus is the probability wave. But are the electrons constantly popping in and out of existence around the nucleus in the cloud?
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28 views

Gain of entropy

Can we really interpretate third thermodynamic law as unconditional gain of entropy of closed system? For example, when they separate U 235, they drive the mix on the pressure barrier, so heavier U ...
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1answer
172 views

Why is the orbital angular momentum of a pi electron along the axis of two atoms' molecule one?

I'm reading quantum chemistry. The book says that the orbital angular momentum of a $\pi$ electron along the symmetry axis of a molecule made up of two atoms is $\pm 1$. I think this is a primary ...
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1answer
71 views

Is it possible to single out a proton, electron, neutron?

I've read that it's nearly impossible to take a proton from an element. But if it's "nearly" impossible then it is possible to some degree. If this has happened, what is exactly the process of taking ...
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1answer
109 views

Reproductibility of the effects described in US patent 8,419,919

US patent 8,419,919, by P. Boss, F. Gordon, S. Szpak, and L. Forsley, describes what (I summarize) would be a method to perform particle generation leading to atomic transmutation, by palladium ...
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36 views

DFT Calculations, Atomic Ionization Potentials — Which Exchange-Correlation Functional to Use, to Preserve Koopmans' Theorem?

I have a program which can perform density-functional calculations for atoms, given a density functional. Of course the simplest form of exchange potential to use is one relevant for a uniform ...
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Why doesn't matter pass through other matter if atoms are 99.999% empty space?

The ghostly passage of one body through another is obviously out of the question if the continuum assumption were valid, but we know that at the micro, nano, pico levels (and beyond) this is not even ...
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1answer
27 views

Dipole approximation in solids

I have seen the use of dipole approximation (where the extent of the wave function is assumed to be much smaller than the wavelengths of the transitions or that of the electromagnetic field applied) ...
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1answer
61 views

Total magnetic moment in an atom

I have a doubt regarding the calculation of total angular momentum of electron in an atom. Which is the right way to do it? Method 1: Total magnetic moment $$ \begin{align} \vec{\mu_J} &= ...
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2answers
90 views

How do I calculate the most probable orbital an electron is in?

If I saw a snapshot in time of an electron near a proton (Hydrogen), then the electron can be in any orbital as long as it doesn't lie on a node of the wave function. So how would I determine which ...
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How to derive the electron dipole selection rule in coupled bases?

We need to find $| \psi_f \rangle$ fulfilling the condition that $$ | \langle \psi_f | \mathbf{x} | \psi_i \rangle |^2 \neq 0.$$ When using the uncoupled bases $| l,m,m_s \rangle$ I can derive the ...
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Why won't protons revolve around the nucleus containing electrons and neutrons?

In case of solar system,we can explain "Why Sun would not revolve around any other planet?",by giving the reason that Sun is heavier than any other planets. Heavier the body,greater will be the ...
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2answers
106 views

Quantised Angular Momentum?

So when learning about the Bohr model of hydrogen and de Broglie waves, it was shown that treating the electron of hydrogen as a de Broglie wave results in the relationship $$L=n\hbar, \qquad ...
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22 views

Should it really be called “valence *sub*shell”?

The Wikipedia article on electron shells states this, which I (a chemical layman) also always assumed: The electrons in the outermost occupied shell (or shells) determine the chemical properties ...
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1answer
91 views

How can we prove that the shape of atom is spherical? [closed]

i am looking for a derivation that can prove that the shape of an atom is spherical . I experimentally proved this statement but i need a theoretical way.
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What is the potential between two hydrogen atoms in the spin-triplet state?

Take the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Assume the two electrons are in the spin-triplet state. How does the potential between two hydrogen atoms look like?
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535 views

Why do we use the Coulomb potential for the hydrogen atom?

When solving the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogen atom, the Coulomb potential $V = \frac{e^2}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 r}$ is used. The Coulomb potential comes from classical electrodynamics, so why ...
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604 views

Why is Graphene Transparent?

Graphene is always in the news now a days and its key features are that it is; very strong, conductive and transparent. It is so transparent that each layer of graphene will only absorb 2% of Light ...
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53 views

Why is Graphene So Strong?

There has been a lot of news about Graphene since its discovery in 2004. And as we are all told it is a revolutionary material which is very strong, conductive and transparent. But what is it about ...
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25 views

photon absorption and emission

I was reading a book (Sears Zemansky) about this subject but I didn't understand something of an example, and this is that according to me there should be a process of emission for each of absorption ...
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What's the elementary reason for the formation of a band gap?

Bohr's solution for an isolated hydrogen atom showed that there are only discrete allowed energy levels, $E_n = -{E_0\over n^2}$ and the solution of the Schreodinger equation provided a certain ...
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75 views

Angular momentum Bohr's model

I have been trying to derive speed, radius etc. in hydrogen atom using Bohr's postulates and not neglecting the coulombic attraction on proton. I know that they will be revolving around their centre ...
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1answer
63 views

Is fluorescence from a single atom/ion visible with the naked eye (e.g. in a strongly coupled trap or cavity)

I remember sitting in on a conference talk by a person (possibly Rainer Blatt) doing research with trapped ions (or single atoms strongly coupled to light in an optical cavity), and the person showed ...
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1answer
20 views

How does An Electric Field Create a Dipole Moment of a Rydberg Atom?

I know that an Rydberg Atom will not usually have a Dipole Moment - as the positive nucleus are surrounded by a negative electron cloud, so there is no uneven charge distribution. However, I also ...
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2k views

Does the mass of an electron change with its “energy state”?

When an electron absorbs a photon, it gets into a higher energy state and goes into the upper orbit/shell. Does (rather should) this absorption of energy also have an impact on its mass (although ...
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1answer
25 views

Why Do Stark Manifold Graphs All Have Negative Energy?

I have been studying Rydberg-Stark State Atoms and their Stark Manifolds (like the one on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hfspec1.jpg) and I was wondering, Why does the y-axis (of Energy ...
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101 views

Does the definition of the SI unit “second” require that possible perturbation of primary frequency standards should be measured?

The definition of the SI unit "second" is stated as The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground ...
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How did Rutherford's gold foil disprove the plum pudding model?

What stops one of the two following scenarios from happening, consistent with the plum pudding model? The $\alpha$ particle, attracted by the electrons on the outer shell of the pudding, orbits ...
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41 views

Correlation between Bohr-model and quantum physics

If you're looking at the probability of finding the electron of a hydrogen atom at a distance $r$ from the nucleus, it turns out that the Bohr model for the radius of the orbit only correlates with ...
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2answers
51 views

How does a electron revolve in Rutherford's model? [duplicate]

How can an electron revolve in a circular orbit because circular motion is an accelerated motion and acc. charged particle is a source of E.M. Wave. So,it should radiate out energy and hence would ...
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43 views

Are there materials with more than two states that can be used in circuit design? [closed]

Are there atoms or materials that have 3 or more states that can be used in circuit design? Can you provide any examples of such materials, and their possible applications to circuit design? And is ...
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5answers
400 views

How does the electron jump across “gaps” in its orbital?

I saw on perhaps COSMOS, and have heard mention from other professors, that electrons sort of "teleport" or something, in their orbital and the quantum level. So looking at the orbitals for a lone ...
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1answer
59 views

Atomic physics - lattice energy

Question: Why is ionic lattice energy inversely proportional to the radius of the atom? Most heterogeneous covalent molecules are polar to some extent. The degree of polarity, or the dipole moment, ...
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2answers
66 views

Electron gas in metals: more like a liquid?

I'm trying to form a figure in my head about how electron bindings look like in metals. The electrons in metals can move freely, as opposed to their pair-bindings in molecules, and form what is often ...
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1answer
54 views

Why anomalous Zeeman effect is more common? [closed]

Why anomalous Zeeman effect is more common? Gone through many books, searched on Google, but couldn't find the answer.
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2answers
53 views

Does electron in an $s$-orbital have angular momentum?

I've read on science forum that electron in orbital $s$ has no angular momentum and would fall into nucleus, so hydrogen atom would not be possible. Electron has mass and speed after all right? So how ...
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2answers
113 views

Centrifugal force in the Hydrogen atom for $L=0$

I have found the following interesting article: http://arxiv.org/abs/0706.0924 The authors examine the radial momentum operator in detail, in particular its time evolution due to the forces acting ...
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Are atoms made of protons, electrons and neutrinos?

If neutrons decay into proton, electron and (anti)neutrino of electron type, then is it safe to say that atoms are protons, electrons and neutrinos?
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1answer
463 views

What are independent parameters in Hellmann–Feynman theorem?

A typical example in textbooks about the application of Hellmann–Feynman theorem is calculating $\left\langle\frac{1}{r^2}\right\rangle$ in hydrogen-like atoms. Wikipedia has a nice demonstration of ...
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3answers
299 views

Do atomic orbitals exist in a fully ionised atom?

Say a H atom is ionised and then it captures a free electron at a later time, do the atomic orbitals then have to go through a transitory phase to accommodate the electron before they form the correct ...
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Why is the sky never green? It can be blue or orange, and green is in between!

I, like everybody I suppose, have read the explanations why the colour of the sky is blue: ... the two most common types of matter present in the atmosphere are gaseous nitrogen and oxygen. ...
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Atom in a box and collapse of the wave-function

Suppose I have an atom trapped in an optically transparent box. I'm assuming the atom is bouncing off of the walls and not bonding, i.e. the center of mass of the atom experiences a square well. Now ...
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Difference between a hydrogen ion and a proton

I've run into a bit of a problem on this weeks coursework. A proton and an electron initially at rest combine to form hydrogen. Find the wavelength of the emitted photon? So, as far as I can ...