Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus. It is primarily concerned with the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus and the processes by which these arrangements change. This includes ions as well as neutral atoms and, ...

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Cold Solid Matter at the End of a Black Hole's Acceleration Disk?

Is it possible that black holes magnetic field are rapidly cooling matter using a type of magneto caloric effect and cold fusion creating new matter only possible with a black hole's gravity? ...
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38 views

Bohr radius question

I'm doing a homework problem where it asks to calculate the diameter of a hydrogen atom with $n=600$. I used the equation $r=\frac{n^2a_0}{Z}$ where $a_0=0.529e^{-10}m$. Solving for $r$ yields: ...
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21 views

Calculate the Bohr radius of a muonic atom

I want to better understand this problem and how to calculate the Bohr radius. The equation I found in my book is $r_n=\frac{n^2 \hbar^2}{mkZe^2}=\frac{n^2a_0}{Z}$. However, I found a problem online ...
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1answer
16 views

Wavelength for imaging an ultracold atom?

I was reading Stamper-Kurn's article Experimental Methods in Ultracold Atomic Physics (link). In the imaging section (page 13), he mentions: Cold atoms are conventionally probed by optical ...
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1answer
108 views
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1answer
74 views

Crystal field in diamond

The crystal field effect occurs in ionic crystals and causes a splitting of the magnetic quantum levels of the cation. The magnitude of the splitting may be roughly computed by obtaining the potential ...
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640 views

Why is salt so hard to remove from water?

Water molecules and various salt molecules are very different. However, it seems very difficult to separate the two. Once a salt is dissolved in water, an energy or chemical intensive method (like ...
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1answer
35 views

If increasing applying energy to an atom excites electrons, why does electrical conductivity decrease as temperature increases?

Applying energy to an atom makes the electrons jump up to higher energy levels. This is known as excitation. Electrons on higher energy levels are easier to remove from an atom than those on lower ...
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1answer
121 views

What is the correct theoretical formula of the Hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen (21cm line)

I found two different expressions to express the energy split of the Hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen (21 cm line, HI) that are not equivalent, imo. from Wolfram: $$\Delta\ E= ...
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4answers
594 views

Why do electrons jump between orbitals? [duplicate]

When an electron is excited to higher energy levels, it will jump back to the same level from which it was excited. Why does it develop "sentiment" with that level?
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35 views

Magnetic field of one electron

I want to reproduce a calculation of the magnetic field at the atomic nuclei produced by one electron in hydrogen: Maxwell gives us: $\vec \nabla \times \vec B = \mu_0 \vec j$ Doing the surface ...
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1answer
36 views

Potential energy of a spherically symmetric charge density in a spherically symmetric electrostatic potential

I'm interested in calculating the potential energy of a spherically symmetric charge density in a spherically symmetric electrostatic potential. More specific, I'm currently trying to calculate the ...
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5answers
16k views

How do electrons jump orbitals?

My question isn't how they receive the energy to jump, but why. When someone views an element's emission spectrum, we see a line spectrum which proves that they don't exist outside of their orbitals ...
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22 views

Why is Bohr's explanation called Bohr's model and not Bohr's theory?

I have seen an answer which tells the difference between model (specific) and a theory (general). And it makes sense 'coz Bohr explained it for the hydrogen atom only. But did he not make a set of ...
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2answers
25 views

Intensity - wavelength graph for X-ray

This is an intensisity vs. wavelength graph of X-ray emmision. The cut-off wavelength is the minimum wavelength of the X-ray emitted. But doesn't minimum wavelength correspond to maximum energy? ...
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3answers
89 views

How is the motion of electron in p orbital?

Does an electron in p orbital move around nucleus or move randomly in any individual lobe of p orbital. if it were to move around nucleus then does p orbital move along with it?
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1answer
41 views

Absorption of photon as particle by an electron

As the photon gets absorbed by the electron and goes to higher energy state, does the photon remains in the electron itself in some form (radiation energy), thereby increasing the mass of electron?
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1answer
205 views

Why does the conjugated $\pi$ bond not violate the Pauli Exclusion Principle?

Let's look at the molecule 1,3 butadiene: $CH_2=CH-CH=CH_2$ and number the carbon atoms 1 to 4 from left to right. The bonds between 1 and 2 and between 3 and 4 are double bonds: each ...
2
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0answers
54 views

Estimating temperature with Boltzmann relation with split emission lines

I'm trying to estimate the temperature of a plasma through the use of hydrogen lines, $H_{\alpha}$ and $H_{\beta}$ using the Boltzmann relation: $$ \frac{ n_{2} }{ n_{1} } = \frac{ g_{2} }{ g_{1} ...
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2answers
99 views

Oscillation of Atom

What exactly does it mean when one says 'one atom of Caesium 137 oscillates 9,192,631,770 times'? I do understand the general thing about oscillation but what exactly is the oscillation of atom, what ...
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0answers
37 views

Is there any well-defined, measurable atomic size?

Is there any well-defined, measurable size at the atomic scale? I was under the impression that the van der Waals radius was a good way of describing the size of an atom, but it turns out to be a ...
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1answer
48 views

Derivation of the Rutherford scattering formula

I have been trying to look for a derivation of the Rutherford scattering formula from Hyperphysics, but cannot find one. It doesn't show up in the original paper How is this equation derived? ...
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2answers
345 views

How do I find the average kinetic energy and average potential energy of a hydrogen electron in the ground state?

How do I find the average kinetic energy and average potential energy of a hydrogen electron in the ground state? In my modern physics class, we are wrapping up the 3D Schrödinger equation, and I am ...
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1answer
321 views

Why is the orbital angular momentum of a pi electron along the axis of two atoms' molecule one?

I'm reading quantum chemistry. The book says that the orbital angular momentum of a $\pi$ electron along the symmetry axis of a molecule made up of two atoms is $\pm 1$. I think this is a primary ...
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2answers
43 views

Bohr's model and positronium

I was trying to get an order of magnitude estimate for the radii and energies of positronium using the Bohr's model. I did find a few places where they have used the reduced mass to replace the ...
2
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0answers
26 views

How precisely do we know the van der Waals radius of hydrogen?

I've found several sources that say the van der Waals radius of hydrogen is $120 pm$. How precisely do we know this number? What order of magnitude is the error on this measurement?
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1answer
69 views

What do term symbols with a half-integer “$L$” like $^3[3/2]_{1/2}$ mean?

Atomic term symbols are used to notate the angular momentum content of the electronic states of an atom, and are normally written down as $$^{2S+1}L_J$$ where the state has total spin $S$, spin ...
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1answer
35 views

Internal energy + energy of electron

Internal energy of a system composed of molecules or atoms is the mean energy of all these particles in the system (energy as kinetic energy, potential energy etc..). But what I am seeing that we are ...
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Why do electrons occupy the space around nuclei, and not collide with them?

We all learn in grade school that electrons are negatively-charged particles that inhabit the space around the nucleus of an atom, that protons are positively-charged and are embedded within the ...
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1answer
93 views

What force keeps electrons in their orbitals and not collapse into the positively charged nucleus? [duplicate]

I know about quantum mechanical model of an atom and how electrons behave like a standing waves and there isn't any lower level energy available for electrons below ground state energy and energy ...
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33 views

Two-Photon Transitions

I'm reading these course notes on two-photon transitions at http://cua.mit.edu/8.421_S06/Chapter9.pdf But I can't understand why it looks like they do not allow for Autler-Townes splitting. In ...
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0answers
20 views

Does an electron's energy decrease while performing its motion? [duplicate]

While revolving around the nucleus if the electron's energy decreases then will it hit the nucleus and if it does what will happen?
3
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2answers
45 views

What is basic difference between photoelectric effect and Compton effect?

What is basic difference between photoelectric effect and Compton effect? In both case a photon hits a loosely bound electron So whats the difference? We get current in photoelectric effect but not in ...
3
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1answer
352 views

Size of positronium

Positronium consists of an electron and a positron. By what factor is a positronium atom bigger than a hydrogen atom? The solution has been explained to me. The characteristic length when solving ...
2
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1answer
408 views

Wigner Threshold law in Photodetachment and Photoionization

I am writing this question here because I have a problem in understanding the Wigner Threshold law in Photodetachment and Photoionization. The Wigner Threshold Law is given by: $\sigma$=$E^{L+1/2}$. ...
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4answers
65 views

What is meant by an excited atom?

I want to know how an atom is when it is excited. If an atom, due to collision of another fast moving atom, becomes fast moving as well, is that also an "excited state"?
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1answer
51 views

Energy of hydrogen atom - Schrodinger equation [closed]

The wavefunction of the electron in the hydrogen atom is $ k* exp(-r/a)$ (k is the normalization constant), but it does not take n into account, whereas the solution of Schrödinger's equation ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Z coordinate expectation value of the Hydrogen atom

I want to find $z-coordinate$ expectation value $\textbf{<z>}$ of the Hydrogen atom wave function $\psi_{1,0,0} = (\pi a^3_0)^{-1/2}e^{-r/a_0}$ in its ground state. I read in some text that ...
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0answers
45 views

Is the Fermi golden rule really accurate for calculating the life time of an atomic level?

In my impression, Fermi golden rule is routinely used in calculating the life time of an excited atomic level. But it is based on the first order perturbation theory, so it is not expected to be ...
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21 views

Can I get Magnesium into gas at room temperature?

This might sit squarely at the intersection of physics, chemistry, and quantum mechanics. I make gas discharge tubes. One color that evades me is green. Apparently Magnesium will do this, but I ...
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0answers
13 views

Coupling between angular momenta of particles conserve angular momentum of each particle?

Suppose there are two particles in angular momentum numbers $j_1$ and $j_2$ respectively. Suppose there is some interaction that couple together the particles' angular momenta. As there is no external ...
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2answers
50 views

Apparatus for generating plasma

I'm working on a project which involves superheating nitrogen to a state of plasma. I was considering using my Fusor, but this project has nothing to do with plasma, and I believe that there are way ...
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3answers
6k views

Negative energy levels in the diagram for a hydrogen atom

The higher the number of the shell (n), the higher is the energy level of the electron. However, why was it necessary to have negative values. So for example, when $n=1$, the energy could be $5 eV$ ...
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1answer
57 views

Is Neutronium possible?

Now I am not talking about neutron stars here. I am talking about a supposed substance with only neutrons in the nucleus. All atoms of this category would have a negative charge and negative charge ...
2
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1answer
200 views

Total magnetic moment in an atom

I have a doubt regarding the calculation of total angular momentum of electron in an atom. Which is the right way to do it? Method 1: Total magnetic moment $$ \begin{align} \vec{\mu_J} &= ...
3
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28 views

Natural linewidth of hyperfine levels?

The D2 line of $^{87}Rb$ is the transition between the $5^2$$P_{3/2}$ and the $5^2$$S_{1/2}$ states. Its linewidth $\Gamma$ is always quoted to be $\sim 6 MHz$. But both states have hyperfine ...
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1answer
125 views

Thermionic emission, delayed emission and predissociation

In molecular photodissociation, the thermionic emission, delayed emission and predissociation are the same? Otherwise, what is the difference between them? My question is not about the solids, but I ...
3
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0answers
50 views

What is the physical meaning of the parameter of a Poisson distribution?

I have done a laboratory session at my university where I had to check that the disintegration of nucleii follows a Poisson distribution. $$P(n)=\frac{\lambda^n}{n!} e^{-\lambda}$$ Where $P(n)$ is ...
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1answer
57 views

Broadband light term in a Hamiltonian

In atomic systems, for a two-level system, the Hamiltonian can be written in the form: $$H=\left( \begin{array}{cc} E_1 & C_{12} \\ C_{21} & E_2 \\ \end{array} \right)$$ where $E_1$ and ...
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3answers
582 views

How can light emit three kinds of spectra?

In case of black-body radiation, radiation gives continuous spectra. Molecular spectra is an example of band spectra. Similarly, there's also the atomic spectra. Why are the spectra of light not same ...