Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus. It is primarily concerned with the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus and the processes by which these arrangements change. This includes ions as well as neutral atoms and, ...

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Does the definition of the SI unit “second” require that possible perturbation of primary frequency standards should be measured?

The definition of the SI unit "second" is stated as The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground ...
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symmetry group of multi-electron atom

Neglecting spin effects, the energy levels of multi-electron atoms are characterized by states of definite total orbital ($L^2$) and spin angular momentum ($S^2$). From this it seems that the ...
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How does any vibrating object generate sound?

We all know that vibration is the cause of sound generation. But here my question is, Internally what happens in vibrating object which creates sound? I guess, generation of sound will be some where ...
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Radioactivity, alpha decay [duplicate]

In alpha decay, a $\text{He}$ nucleus is emited along with a daughter nuclide. Now suppose $\text{U}$ with atomic number 92 and atomic mass 238 emits an alpha particle and a daughter nuclide is formed ...
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Molecules from atoms [on hold]

Why does two oxygen atoms combine to form a molecule and not 3 or 4?Also why does one sodium and one chlorine atom combine to form NaCl while two chlorine atoms are required to combine with one ...
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Why are most metals gray/silver?

Why do most metals (iron, tin, aluminum, lead, zinc, tungsten, nickel, etc.) appear silver or gray in color? (What atomic characteristics determine the color?) What makes copper and gold have ...
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32 views

Question on heat

Is this statement correct? The oxygen and nitrogen molecules in a box has equal average kinetic energy but the oxygen molecules are faster. I am not sure because I thought oxygen molecules should move ...
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20 views

Complex scaling method for solving resonance states

I am now reading about the complex scaling method for solving resonance states. As far as I understand, the procedure goes like this: Let us take the 1d potential $V(x) = A e^{-x^2} x^2 $ as an ...
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488 views

What's an atomic superstate/superposition, and how is it possible?

What's an atomic superstate/superposition, and how is it possible? I understand the basics - being something can be moving and staying still at the same time; the observer changes the behaviour - but ...
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242 views

Wigner Threshold law in Photodetachment and Photoionization

I am writing this question here because I have a problem in understanding the Wigner Threshold law in Photodetachment and Photoionization. The Wigner Threshold Law is given by: $\sigma$=$E^{L+1/2}$. ...
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77 views

Atomic physics - lattice energy

Question: Why is ionic lattice energy inversely proportional to the radius of the atom? Most heterogeneous covalent molecules are polar to some extent. The degree of polarity, or the dipole moment, ...
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1answer
129 views

What is the most accurate experimental confirmation of Rutherford's $\sin^{-4}\phi/2$ law?

What is the most accurate experimental confirmation to date of Rutherford's $\sin^{-4}\phi/2$ law, where $\phi$ is the scattering angle?
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85 views

How does exciting an electron's surrounding electromagnetic field cause 'electron excitation'?

In more meaningful words than the ones above, how does adding energy to the EM field cause the electron to to change orbitals or oscillate in a different pattern.
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The Internal Structure of A Nucleon [duplicate]

Just like, in a Bohr model, the atom has a particular structure, what is it like inside of a nucleon? Like, are there particular ways the quarks are arranged, and what about the binding energy that ...
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An atomic bomb explodes inside of an “unbreakable” container which is on a scale. Does the “weight” of the container change?

This may or may not be an incredibly stupid thought experiment, but a short time ago I read that most of the "mass" in the proton was actually energy from the quarks and gluons, as opposed to the ...
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31 views

What does excitation in an atom mean?

This is not regarding the definition of excitation itself. What I'm having trouble with is the difference between "electron excitation" and "atom excitation". When I electron inside the atom gets ...
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1answer
94 views

Is fluorescence from a single atom/ion visible with the naked eye (e.g. in a strongly coupled trap or cavity)

I remember sitting in on a conference talk by a person (possibly Rainer Blatt) doing research with trapped ions (or single atoms strongly coupled to light in an optical cavity), and the person showed ...
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1answer
53 views

What happens when an electron collides with an atom?

I was solving this question: Here is part of the energy level diagram of hydrogen: n=4 --> -0.85eV n=3 --> -1.50eV n=2 --> -3.40eV n=1 --> -13.6eV When an electron of ...
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37 views

Energy transitions of 12.1eV electron?

Here is part of the energy level diagram of hydrogen: n=4 --> -0.85eV n=3 --> -1.50eV n=2 --> -3.40eV n=1 --> -13.6eV When an electron of energy 12.1eV collides with this ...
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What is nuclide notation referring to? Only the nucleus or the whole atom?

sorry that this is an easy question but I am just a bit confused about nuclide notation. When you say e.g. $^{240}_{94}\text{Pu}$, are you referring to the atom of $\text{Pu}$ or only its nucleus? It ...
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How is an atom ionized by electron impact?

Can someone walk me through in detail what happens when an atom is ionized by colliding with an electron? I would prefer a solid example so I can understand it more concretely. What I think:- -The ...
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3answers
597 views

Can I move the atom nucleus only?

I was wondering if it is possible to move the atom nucleus and leave behind the electrons? I can imagine that the electrons will follow the nucleus. But what if the speed of the nucleus is almost the ...
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1answer
22 views

Sub-structure of hyperfine levels

In studying introductory atomic physics I have come across fine structure splittings in energy levels due to spin-orbit coupling. Which has a sub-structure called hyperfine structure which comes from ...
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32 views

Definition of “first excitation energy”?

I was solving a problem but I didn't know what the term "first excitation energy" means. The first excitation energy of the hydrogen atom is $10.2\text{eV}$. Calculate the speed of the slowest ...
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1answer
109 views

Total magnetic moment in an atom

I have a doubt regarding the calculation of total angular momentum of electron in an atom. Which is the right way to do it? Method 1: Total magnetic moment $$ \begin{align} \vec{\mu_J} &= ...
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2answers
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Why is there no electric dipole term in the Hyperfine Hamiltonian?

I have been looking a several discussions of hyperfine structure. (For example: here and in the explanation for eq. 2.1 here It seems that the hyperfine interaction can be explained almost entirely ...
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110 views

Thermionic emission, delayed emission and predissociation

In molecular photodissociation, the thermionic emission, delayed emission and predissociation are the same? Otherwise, what is the difference between them? My question is not about the solids, but I ...
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61 views

Algebraic solution of Dirac equation for Coulomb potential

The Runge-Lenz operator enables an algebraic solution of Coulomb potential energy levels without a solution of a differential equation. What is the analog for the solution of the Dirac equation in a ...
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1answer
46 views

Are there unobservable, undiscovered atoms?

Is it possible that there is a network of atomic activity that our current scientific instrumentation cannot detect? In other words, could it be possible that there are unobservable, undiscovered ...
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About atomic transitions

I accomplished my homework but it opened a whole pandora's box of things I do not quite understand, so I would appreciate help. In x direction linearly polarized light excites atom transition from ...
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38 views

Understanding quantum coherence in biological processes (Magnetoreception)

Moved my questions to the top. Context below. Why is the strength of the electric field and the coupling constant being compared to the inverse coherence time? What is the inverse coherence time? Is ...
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148 views

Unknown magnetic moment of orthohydrogen

Conforming to present atomic physics, the two elementary particles in hydrogen atoms can have either parallel or antiparallel magnetic moments, and the energy differences between these two kinds of ...
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1answer
28 views

How does Nitrogen transition between a quarter and a doublet state?

My degree was in Electrical Engineering, and as a result I don't fully understand the formatting of the ${}^4S_{3/2}$ ${}^2D_{3/2}$ and ${}^2P_{1/2}$ of the different 2p orbitals, and I don't believe ...
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1answer
52 views

Orbital angular momentum of electrons

In a QM class, to study the hydrogen atom, we started by defining the Hamiltonian $H$ for a central potential, then made an orbital angular momentum operator appear as part of $H$, then down the line ...
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1answer
146 views

Size of hydrogenic atoms

Positronium consists of an electron and a positron. By what factor is a positronium atom bigger than a hydrogen atom? The solution has been explained to me. The characteristic length when solving ...
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1answer
232 views

Why is the orbital angular momentum of a pi electron along the axis of two atoms' molecule one?

I'm reading quantum chemistry. The book says that the orbital angular momentum of a $\pi$ electron along the symmetry axis of a molecule made up of two atoms is $\pm 1$. I think this is a primary ...
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How does one calculate the volume of a nucleus and the volume of an atom (in this case hydrogen)?

The hydrogen atom contains 1 proton and 1 electron. The radius of the proton is approximately 1.0 fm (femtometers), and the radius of the hydrogen atom is approximately 53 pm (picometers).
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Can someone explain the quote “there would be no chemistry if electrons acted as bosons”?

I am reading a book and in a quote it says that if electrons acted as bosons, then all the electrons would occupy the lowest energy state, and there would be no chemistry. What does the author mean ...
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40 views

what is a clock state?

What is a clock state in atomic physics ? I read this term here http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2708678/ and tried to find a reference to explain the same but have been unable to find this ...
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3answers
34 views

Database of experimental cross sections for atomic collisions

Does the atomic-physics community keep a comprehensive database of experimental data (cross sections) for atomic collisions? I am looking for data about Bremsstrahlung, ionization, elastic and ...
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1answer
26 views

Apparatus for generating plasma

I'm working on a project which involves superheating nitrogen to a state of plasma. I was considering using my Fusor, but this project has nothing to do with plasma, and I believe that there are way ...
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1answer
27 views

Is the Singlet state for Helium with 2 electrons symmetric rather than anti-symmetric as is meant to be for fermions?

I'm looking at two-electron Helium atoms where one electron is in the ground state (due to if it were in other states, it's de-excitation would simply lead to the ionization of the electron). The ...
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1answer
10 views

What happens to the velocity map image if the plane of polarization is not on the plane of the detector?

In an electron Velocity Map Imaging (in Velocity Map Imaging in general) it is required that the plane of polarization to be parallel to the plane of the detector (in other words, plane or ...
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1answer
20 views

Since electron clouds of different atoms repel each other, does that mean that touch is the feeling of electromagnetic repulsion? [duplicate]

Also when we rest our hand on an object does that mean we are effectively levitating because of the repulsion of the electron clouds?
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Atomic physics, determining levels and terms

In atomic physics I understand there a configurations, terms and levels. I think levels for instance appear because of spin-orbit interactions, so that terms are split. But I'm confused about the ...
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1answer
55 views

Why is it necessary to supply constant electricity to make a laser work?

As we know that in lasers there are excited atoms. When energy is provided in the form of light, heat or electricity to these atoms, these excited atoms after sometime go to a lower state of energy ...
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30 views

What is the largest atom with a reliable configuration-interaction (CI) calculation?

The simplest approximation for calculating the ground state of an atom is the Hartree-Fock approximation. To get accurate result for the ground state energy, one has to do configuration-interaction ...
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1answer
34 views

About sub-atomic physics and the models used

I sit true every sub-atomic particle can have a mathematical representation as a wave? Can an electron and a proton and a neutron be represented as waves? Regarding every theory about sub-atomic ...
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What happens when you use an electric field to match atom oscillations?

I've been thinking about this question for the last few days: "What happens when you either use an electric field or sound / light to match the frequency of the atomic lattice?" What would happen to ...
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Are ultracold atoms only created by intelligent life?

Nature has particle accelerators that are far beyond our capacity, but occasionally I hear atomic physicists claim that they are able to make something that has never been formed in any natural ...