Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus. It is primarily concerned with the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus and the processes by which these arrangements change. This includes ions as well as neutral atoms and, ...

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Number of decays in a chain reaction

It is widely known that the probability of $n$ decays from one system to another $A \rightarrow B$ (e.g., electrons decaying from one atomic energy level to another or muons decaying into neutrinos ...
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129 views

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields?

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields? If so can it be done around $-135°C$ zero?
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5answers
323 views

What laws (formulas) govern forces between atoms?

What laws (formulas) govern the fundamental forces of nature? For example, gravity is governed by the inverse-square law. I am thinking about how particles attract each other, but also repel. All ...
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522 views

How is the speed of light an absolute maximum speed in the universe? [closed]

Under the heading which came first, the chicken or the egg, which came first: the maximum velocity of electrons orbiting the atom, or the speed of light as the maximum velocity limit? Is it possible ...
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170 views

Principle of Reflection on atomic level

The well observed phenomenon has besides several others has always been a fascination to me, we are well aware of several theories, experiments and practical applications of the well known phenomenon. ...
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1k views

Why won't protons revolve around the nucleus containing electrons and neutrons?

In case of solar system,we can explain "Why Sun would not revolve around any other planet?",by giving the reason that Sun is heavier than any other planets. Heavier the body,greater will be the ...
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32 views

Factors defining interaction between atoms and molecules

Let's say we have a stuff that consists only of hydrogen (H), then we add a single atom of oxygen (O) and they interfere - we get a water molecule where atoms are arranged in a particular way. Then we ...
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1answer
199 views

Density matrix and irreducible tensor operators

I'm reading those lecture notes on atomic physics. Yesterday I posed a question on reducible tensors, and today I have a question on their relation to the density matrix. If there's any information ...
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3answers
132 views

What does “transform among themselves” mean?

I'm reading a script on atomic physics, and there's a chapter on irreducible tensors. I can't understand the meaning of "transform among themselves" in this context: An arbitrary rotation of the ...
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2answers
99 views

Why is it energetically favourable for molecular bonds to form from a QM point of view?

For example, if you have two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom, they are all electrically neutral and don't attract each other. But then if they manage to get "close enough" somehow they snap together ...
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2answers
256 views

Which cyan colored line is produced in the Thomson e/m apparatus?

Related: Which green spectral line(s) are emitted in a Thomson tube? After reading Lisa Lee’s OP on an electron deflection tube, although she had some misunderstandings on its operation, I still ...
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133 views

Stern-Gerlach and Hund's second rule

According to Hund's second rule, the spin tends to be maximal. That would, in my understanding, imply that, regarding the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the important electron in a silver atom has spin ...
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1answer
132 views

Which green spectral line(s) are emitted in a Thomson tube?

Related: What is meant by boiling off electrons in a heater coil? In the Thomson tube we used in our class to produce an electron beam, the lab manual stated that the tube was filled with a low ...
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1answer
60 views

Lifetime of 3d state shorter than 3s state in hydrogen atom

Can you say that the lifetime of the 3d state in the hydrogen atom is shorter than the one of the 3s state because the centrifugal energy associated with 3d is higher than the one associated with 3s? ...
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64 views

Stress and Mass Density Distribution

I'm simulating electromigration in a copper wire using COMSOL and trying to see the back-stress caused by material transport. However, I do not see any stress growth. In other words, the atomic ...
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1answer
26 views

Electron configurations and $M_{s}$ quantum numbers

I have a little question that are confusing me at bit. I have to argue, from the Pauli Exclusion Principle, that $M_{s} = 2$ is the maximum $M_{s}$ quantum number for the $nd^{6}$ configuration. Now, ...
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1answer
52 views

Why can I see the 5D0 to 7F3 transition in the trivalent Eu?

According to the selection rules of the intra-configurational f-f transitions, if the J of the initial or final state is zero, a transition with $\Delta J = 3$ is forbidden by electrical dipole, ...
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2answers
237 views

Quantum Mechanical Meaning of Atomic Orbitals

According to quantum mechanics, for multi-electron atoms, a single electron around the nuclei can be in the state of linear combination of different eigen energy states. In that case, even the energy ...
2
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1answer
132 views

Volume charge density of H-atom

I have a problem where I am supposed to calculate the volume charge density of a neutral hydrogen atom. The potential is given to be $$ \Phi = k \frac{e^{-ar}}{r} \left(1 + \frac{ar}{2}\right) $$ Now ...
2
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1answer
333 views

A Simple Explanation for the Schrödinger Equation and Model of Atom? [closed]

I tried reading the Wikipedia article to no avail - I simply cannot understand the Schrödinger Equation (what does each of the variables mean, especially the wave function), and the Schrödinger Model ...
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2answers
770 views

Continuous vs. Discrete Spectra in various materials

I read that the reason solids emit continuous spectra is that they don't have time to let their electrons decay-they are too close together. Given that electrons decay on the order of 100 nanoseconds ...
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1answer
307 views

Hydrogen ground state energy calculation?

We want to find the energy of a hydrogen atom ($Z=1$) in the ground state $$ \psi_{100} = \frac{1}{\sqrt{\pi}}e^{-r}\ \ \ \ \ \ (\mbox{atomic units}) $$ with Hamiltonian $$ H = ...
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1answer
70 views

Some questions regarding the behaviour of electrons [closed]

If I understand correctly: An atom acts a potential well for the electrons -- and particles in a potential well have discrete energy levels. There is a non-zero minimum to this energy called the ...
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35 views

How to calculate the binding energy of electron of hydrogen atom by using uncertainty principle? [duplicate]

How to calculate the binding energy of an electron of hydrogen atom using uncertainty principle?
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1answer
170 views

How to theoretically determine the angular momentum of an atom?

To determine if an atom is a boson or a fermion I have to count the fermions that constitute the atom (protons, neutrons and electrons). My question is: How to theoretically (as opposed to ...
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1answer
650 views

Why do most metals appear silver in color with gold being an exception from a scattering and EM viewpoint?

Related: Why are most metals gray/silver? After reading Johannes’ impressive answer to Ali Abbasinasab question of why do most metals appear silver in color with the exception of gold (and copper), ...
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649 views

Why are the classical electron radius, the Bohr radius and the Compton wavelength of an electron related to each other?

Using the definition of the fine-structure constant $\alpha = \frac{4 \pi \epsilon_0 \hbar c}{e^2}$ and the Compton wavelength of an electron $\lambda_c = \frac{h}{m_e c}$ the classical electron ...
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1answer
177 views

Distinction between Larmor frequency and Rabi frequency

Wikipedia said "In the context of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, the Rabi frequency is the nutation frequency of a sample's net nuclear magnetization vector about a radiofrequency field. ...
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1answer
52 views

What happens when an ion hits an electron?

For example: $Xe^{+}+e^{-} \rightarrow Xe + \mbox{energy}$ Assuming that the electron has a kinetic energy $\neq 0$. Is the released energy a photon or heat?
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If atoms never “physically” touch each others, then how does matter-antimatter annihilation happen?

It is known that matter and antimatter annihilate each others when they "touch" each others. And as far as I know, the concept of "touching" as our brain gets it is not true on the atomic level since ...
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1answer
65 views

Difference between photo electron spectrum and photoelectron angular distribution

I am trying to learn the Photoelectron velocity map imaging. While I was going through the article "Chem. Soc. Rev., 2009,38,2169-2177", it is said that the "photoelectron spectrum reflects the energy ...
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2answers
359 views

The Quantization of Photon Energies

Despite Planck's constant being in $E=hf$, it would appear to me that energy is still not discrete, as frequency can be an fraction of a Hertz that one wants. How does this imply that electromagnetic ...
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76 views

Is a “supercritical charge” in graphene similar to Hawking Radiation?

These papers describe a phenomenon referred to as "atomic collapse" and "supercritical charge" in graphene: Wang et al., Pereira et al. "Atomic collapse" appears when you have a large enough Coulomb ...
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1answer
115 views

Why nuclear tests move under ground since 1964?

According to this database: http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/nuclear-explosion.jsp Since 1962, 99% of USA Nuclear tests was underground. Since 1964, 99% of Soviet Nuclear tests was underground. Is it ...
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1answer
222 views

Derivation for 7.14 in Atomic Physics by Foot

I was going thru Ch7 of Foot and trying to fill in the gaps. However I got stuck on (7.14). So Foot was working with a two level system with a small perturbation in the Hamiltonian resulted from an ...
3
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1answer
255 views

Why electron clouds in atoms don't radiate? [duplicate]

I was reading that Bohr assumed electrons in orbit simply did not radiate, and my professor told me that the actual case is that electrons are clouds of probability. Even so, aren't they still moving ...
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5answers
5k views

Why are most metals gray/silver?

Why do most metals (iron, tin, aluminum, lead, zinc, tungsten, nickel, etc.) appear silver or gray in color? (What atomic characteristics determine the color?) What makes copper and gold have ...
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1answer
202 views

Can atoms have nonzero dipole moments?

Let's make the question easier by considering two-level atoms(with spin states, i.e. spin up $|\uparrow\rangle$ and spin down $|\downarrow\rangle$). An article I recently read claims that atoms do not ...
3
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2answers
204 views

Where do mass polarization terms come from in many-body Hamiltonian? Why are they sometimes omitted?

This question is about the Hamiltonian for more than one particle (non-relativistic). Griffiths (Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, 2e) seems to imply that it is $\displaystyle ...
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0answers
65 views

Laser Transverse/Longitudnal Modes

When we say Laser transverse modes. Is that mean what we will get at the output spot of laser beam ? secondly In practice , what TEM01 or TEMnm means ?
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746 views

Lasing in a 2-Level system?

What exactly is the difference between 2-Level, 3-Level and 4-Level systems? Why can we not achieve stimulated emission in a two-level system using optical pumping?
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37 views

Total scattering rate of light for an atomic transition given a laser field with an intensity distribution?

I have a laser with an intensity distribution $I(\lambda)$ over a broad wavelength range (arroun 40 nm), I want to calculate the total scattering rate due to the full spectrum of the laser; the the ...
3
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3answers
164 views

Stimulated Emission

In the case of stimulated emission we always see that one photon goes into the gain medium and two photons come out. How can this conserve energy?
3
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2answers
119 views

Neutron decay and particles

On this picture you can see that this $d$ quark turns into $u$ quark and makes this $W^-$ boson. $W^-$ then apparently turns the anti-electron neutrino, $\bar{\nu_e}$, into an electron, $e^-$. My ...
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1answer
213 views

home made atom destruction unit [closed]

Today we learnt at school that atoms can be destructed. I believe Physics is a great science to do experiment and I would like to try it at home. Could you tell me what I need to do it? and is it ...
5
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2answers
365 views

An atomic bomb explodes inside of an “unbreakable” container which is on a scale. Does the “weight” of the container change?

This may or may not be an incredibly stupid thought experiment, but a short time ago I read that most of the "mass" in the proton was actually energy from the quarks and gluons, as opposed to the ...
14
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4answers
465 views

Why is it often assumed that particles are found in energy eigenstates?

Energy eigenstates provide a convenient basis for solving quantum mechanics problems, but they are by no means the only allowable states. Yet it seems to me that particles/systems are assumed to be in ...
2
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0answers
102 views

Line-shape asymmetry in undergraduate Hydrogen-Deuterium experiment

I'm working as an LA (undergraduate TA) for an undergraduate physics laboratory experiment where students test the Bohr model and use reduced mass to determine the approximate mass of the neutron. In ...
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8answers
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Where did Schrödinger solve the radiating problem of Bohr's model?

One of the problems with Bohr's theory to describe the hydrogen atom, was that the electron orbiting around the nucleus has an acceleration. Therefore it radiates and loses energy, until it would ...
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1answer
39 views

Balmer absorption lines

I'm having a bit of trouble understanding Balmer lines, is this correct, and the questions are in brackets: 1) A star needs to be hot enough such that electrons are in the n=2 state (why does the ...