Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus. It is primarily concerned with the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus and the processes by which these arrangements change. This includes ions as well as neutral atoms and, ...

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What changes occur while an atom approches the speed of light?

My knowledge of atomic dynamics is a little superficial. But to my understanding an electron travels an orbital path around a nucleus of an atom. "correct?" So let's say that if a hydrogen atom were ...
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62 views

Electrostatic potential of a proton

I have been working on a quantum mechanical problem regarding the ground state of the Hydrogen atom. It appears that the best way to solve the underlying problem is to modify the electrostatic ...
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1answer
57 views

Kinetic energy and temperature

I've randomly been thinking about smoothies and internal energy all weekend. If we have an assortment of fruit in the solid phase and then proceed to blend it all so that it ends up being in the ...
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126 views

Show that the circumference of the Bohr orbit of hydrogen is an integral multiple of the wavelength of the electron in it [closed]

We have an electron revolving in a the $n$th Bohr orbit of an atom of hydrogen. The problem is to prove that the circumference of the orbit is an integral multiple of wavelength of this electron ...
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87 views

What are the assumptions behind “term symbols”?

In multi-electron atoms, the electronic state of the optically active "subshell" is often expressed in "term symbols" notation. I.e. $^{2S+1}L_J$. This presumes that the system of electrons has ...
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99 views

Thermal equilibrium and kinetic energies

Is temperature solely a function of a kinetic energy? If a solid and a gas are at thermal equilibrium at a temperature of 20 degrees Celsius, the solid has much less kinetic energy than the gas. How ...
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142 views

How do I write the Hamiltonian for a 3-level system?

I came across following types of three-level systems like V-system, Λ-system and 2-photon absorption It seems that their Hamiltonians can be written intuitively by checking out the coupled levels ...
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3answers
100 views

Atomic Physics: stimulated emission

I'm studying a chapter about atomic physics right now but there's thing I just don't seem to understand. When stimulated emission occurs, there's an incoming photon which stimulates the atom to go an ...
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2answers
165 views

What force creates ions out of neutral atoms?

Consider the reaction between Na and Cl to form NaCl. Na loses an electron and "gives" it to Cl because this makes both atoms more stable. But what forces "pulls" the electron from Na to Cl? Both ...
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92 views

How were atom bombs made before the first atom was observed by electron microscope?

How were atom bombs made before the first atom was observed by electron microscope? Give a brief history regarding my question please?
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78 views

Energy required to remove both electrons [closed]

The question is: Q. An energy of $24.6$eV is required to remove one of the electrons from a neutral Helium atom. The energy(in eV) required to remove both the electrons from a neutral Helium atom is: ...
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79 views

Geometric quantization in Kepler problem in hydrogen atom

Why in the usual geometric quantization calculation the dimensions of eigenspaces is wrong (we can see this obstacle for Kepler problem in hydrogen atom). Here is a refference see
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132 views

What is the reason for the electrons in a given subshell to orient in certain preferred regions?

My text book says: "Magnetic quantum number describes the behavior of electron in a magnetic field. We know that the movement of electrical charge is always associated with magnetic field. Since ...
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450 views

Why do atoms stick together?

The atoms in my table "stick together" to form a rectangle. Why? What makes them stick together? I know about ionic/covalent bonding etc., but consider a sheet of pure iron. Just atoms of one ...
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35 views

Rydberg quasimolecules & stark states?

I found this image : on the internet and I traced it back to this article ,I wanted to use it as part of an architectural visualization for my project(architecture) but for this to happen I need to ...
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2answers
166 views

What's an atomic superstate/superposition, and how is it possible?

What's an atomic superstate/superposition, and how is it possible? I understand the basics - being something can be moving and staying still at the same time; the observer changes the behaviour - but ...
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1answer
88 views

Angular momentum of hydrogen from $n,l,m$ values

Given a wavefunction for hydrogen $\psi(n,l,m)$ it is possible to calculate its associated energy from $E=-13.6/n^2$. Does a similar equation exist for $L^2$ and $L_z$? That is, if we are given the ...
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77 views

energy difference uniqueness in hydrogen atom

Is the energy difference between two energy levels unique for that particular pair of levels for a hydrogen atom ? If so how can one prove it?
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120 views

Atoms and electrons?

Consider a copper atom. If you place an electron near it, the protons in the nucleus would attract it like they attract the existing electron in the valence shell. However the electron you placed ...
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285 views

Is it that electron of an atom can be found anywhere in the space?

Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found. The diagrams cannot, ...
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62 views

What gives an object its colour?

My understanding of colour is that atoms in a particular object will absorb certain wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, and the scattered wavelengths give the object its colour. The absorbed ...
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1answer
98 views

Does there exist electric field around all the substances?

A system of two equal and opposite charges separated by a certain distance is called an electric dipole. Electric dipole moment ($p$) is defined as the product of either charge ($q$) and the ...
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1answer
130 views

Electron Decay, Why are there P and higher orbitals?

Related: Decay from excited state to ground state My confusion arose initially from the definition of binding energy being the lowest energy state (n=1) in the hydrogen atom. This, I assume, is ...
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5answers
577 views

Do electrons collapse into nucleus, if electrons in the atom are constantly excited?

From the Bohr's atomic model, it is clear that electron can have only certain definite energy levels. When the electron is present as close to the nucleus as possible, the atom has the minimum ...
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1answer
434 views

What is limiting line in series spectrum?

The wavelength of first line in the Balmer Series is 'whatever(in nm)' . Calculate the wavelength of the second line and the 'limiting line' in the Balmer Series. I found this question in an ...
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1answer
147 views

Why do electrons couple in atoms?

In describing electron states in hydrogen, we have a very "simple" picture, at least in intro-quantum. But this only has one electron! As we permit more electrons, we also have things like the ...
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4answers
262 views

Why is the Bohr's idea of defined circular orbits overruled?

If we consider a thought experiment for determining position of an electron by using photons of light. According to principles of optics, if we use light of wavelength $\lambda$, then the position of ...
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1answer
88 views

Gravitational Stark Effect

Could gravity induce line splittings in the optical spectrum of a molecule similar to the Stark or Zeeman Effects? Naively, a gravitational potential would be a simple addition to the Hamiltonian ...
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1answer
119 views

What happens when you give excess energy to an atom?

So this is my question: An electron in a hydrogen atom in its ground state absorbs energy equal to the ionisation energy of $Li^{2+}$. The wavelength of the emitted electron is? I started off by ...
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1answer
853 views

What prevents an atom's electrons from “collapsing” onto its protons? [duplicate]

Forgive me if the answer to this is obvious. I have no formal physics training, and I remember that when I asked my physics teacher this, she just frowned and said "Good question." An electron is ...
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1answer
52 views

Possibility of stable muonic structures?

In an analogy to the neutron, which decays rapidly as a free particle, but when bound in a nucleus it is stable, would it be possible to crease a structure that permits the stability of muons - be it ...
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1k views

Collision between electron and proton?

What would happen if an electron collided with a proton such that the two do not collapse? Would the two become a unit, or would some force prevent them from bonding thus forcing the electron to orbit ...
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172 views

Probability of absorption and emission of photons

Suppose you have a single electron in a box, and you shoot a single photon at it. How does one calculate the probability that the photon will be absorbed and the particle excited? Or that the photon ...
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1answer
90 views

Ramsey Interactions

What are Ramsey interactions? I am researching atomic clocks and am not sure why the atoms need to be exposed twice to an electromagnetic field in order to cause excitation.
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413 views

Does an electron move from one excitation state to another, or jump?

I'm wondering, when an electron changes state, does it move from one state to another over some (very small) time period? Or does it change from one state to another in no time? If the former, what ...
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1answer
67 views

What are the fastest electron orbitals

I read that the mercury has a low melting point because its outer shell electrons are pulled in close by its nucleus (large nucleus, sparse outer shell) and because its outer shell electrons have ...
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74 views

Is the relative atomic mass directly proportional to the size of an atom? [closed]

I have a piece of homework, i have to make a pair of models depicting pure metals and alloys. I want it to be as accurate as possible, and so i'm asking this: Is the relative atomic mass directly ...
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1answer
132 views

Aren't all electrons the same? So what about electron that absorbs photon?

I learned that electron absorbs a photon and goes into higher energy state. But also all electrons are identical. What is a difference between the electron in low orbital energy state? and the high ...
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1answer
135 views

Number of decays in a chain reaction

It is widely known that the probability of $n$ decays from one system to another $A \rightarrow B$ (e.g., electrons decaying from one atomic energy level to another or muons decaying into neutrinos ...
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2answers
125 views

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields?

Can protons in the nucleus of an atom be aligned by electromagnetic fields? If so can it be done around $-135°C$ zero?
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5answers
318 views

What laws (formulas) govern forces between atoms?

What laws (formulas) govern the fundamental forces of nature? For example, gravity is governed by the inverse-square law. I am thinking about how particles attract each other, but also repel. All ...
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2answers
453 views

How is the speed of light an absolute maximum speed in the universe? [closed]

Under the heading which came first, the chicken or the egg, which came first: the maximum velocity of electrons orbiting the atom, or the speed of light as the maximum velocity limit? Is it possible ...
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165 views

Principle of Reflection on atomic level

The well observed phenomenon has besides several others has always been a fascination to me, we are well aware of several theories, experiments and practical applications of the well known phenomenon. ...
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968 views

Why won't protons revolve around the nucleus containing electrons and neutrons?

In case of solar system,we can explain "Why Sun would not revolve around any other planet?",by giving the reason that Sun is heavier than any other planets. Heavier the body,greater will be the ...
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32 views

Factors defining interaction between atoms and molecules

Let's say we have a stuff that consists only of hydrogen (H), then we add a single atom of oxygen (O) and they interfere - we get a water molecule where atoms are arranged in a particular way. Then we ...
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1answer
178 views

Density matrix and irreducible tensor operators

I'm reading those lecture notes on atomic physics. Yesterday I posed a question on reducible tensors, and today I have a question on their relation to the density matrix. If there's any information ...
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3answers
131 views

What does “transform among themselves” mean?

I'm reading a script on atomic physics, and there's a chapter on irreducible tensors. I can't understand the meaning of "transform among themselves" in this context: An arbitrary rotation of the ...
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2answers
94 views

Why is it energetically favourable for molecular bonds to form from a QM point of view?

For example, if you have two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom, they are all electrically neutral and don't attract each other. But then if they manage to get "close enough" somehow they snap together ...
2
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2answers
242 views

Which cyan colored line is produced in the Thomson e/m apparatus?

Related: Which green spectral line(s) are emitted in a Thomson tube? After reading Lisa Lee’s OP on an electron deflection tube, although she had some misunderstandings on its operation, I still ...
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2answers
130 views

Stern-Gerlach and Hund's second rule

According to Hund's second rule, the spin tends to be maximal. That would, in my understanding, imply that, regarding the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the important electron in a silver atom has spin ...