1
vote
0answers
66 views

Why is graphene the only (stable) 2D sheet structure? [duplicate]

I know that Carbon molecules can form different structures depending on how they bond with each other: graphite, diamond, graphene and fullerene. As far as I understand, graphene is just a "sheet" of ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is there any defect in Rutherford's atomic model according to quantum theory?

According to quantum mechanics charged bodies do not emit energy. Then why the atomic model of Rutherford has the defects of collapsing nucleus, continues spectrum.
8
votes
2answers
948 views

How does an electron move around in an orbital? Is it “wave-like” or random?

When an electron is moving around in it's orbital, is it actually moving around like a wave, like this video shows? (By wave-like, I mean, the "electron" in this video is showing it following a ...
1
vote
4answers
140 views

How does the electron jump across “gaps” in its orbital?

I saw on perhaps COSMOS, and have heard mention from other professors, that electrons sort of "teleport" or something, in their orbital and the quantum level. So looking at the orbitals for a lone ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Why is the full eigen function is product of eigen functions and not addition?

For example suppose there is a two electron system. Why is the full eigen function product of the spatial eigen function and spin wave function for the two electron system?
2
votes
1answer
98 views

Question about atom subshells

So my teacher told me that EACH shell contains 5 subshells (s, p, d, f, g) but what I don't understand is this The 1st shell has only 1 subshell (and not 5 like he said) and the number of ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Eigenfunctions for $1s$ hydrogen Schrodinger equation

I am a computer scientist and started my Phd in material science. The second course os my Phd is material simulation by computer. One the task is show the verification of the eigenfunction $1s$ from ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Stimulated emission and coherence

For a significant part of my life I have been taught that, if a photon of the "correct" energy meets an excited atom, the atom will then (with a certain probability) undergo transition to a lower ...
2
votes
4answers
119 views

Bond Angles - H2O vs CO2

H2O has a 109.5 degree bond angle, but CO2 has exactly 180 degrees. Is there a qualitative reason for this? It's hard to believe CO2 is exactly 180 degrees unless there were some symmetry, but the ...
2
votes
3answers
164 views

Why can't electrons fall into the nucleus?

I read a book on pop sci book on quantum mechanics and the author said that electrons do not fall into the nucleus due to quantum mechanics- which principles suggest this (I think it was Heisenberg's ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Formation of atoms question

Could you please, explain to me the logic of the folllowing process as you would do to your 8 y/o sister: Ubiquitousness and stability of atoms relies on their binding energy, which means that ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Total Angular Momentum of a Hydrogen Atom

Griffiths in his celebrated book named 'Introduction to Quantum Mechanics' discusses about the total angular momentum of a hydrogen atom on page 187. He writes: If a hydrogen atom is in the ...
-1
votes
0answers
25 views

Atomic Brownian Motion

Since atoms 'wiggle' proportionally to their energy level, I have two questions: Does it last 'forever'? Absolute Zero question And so, is this 'flux' a fundamental force? Then as an extra ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Uncertain if invoking uncertainty principle for wave function is handwaving [duplicate]

Why doesn't the electron collapse onto the proton in a hydrogen atom? One explanation seems to be given by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which follows from the purely physical assertion that ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Spectral series' formula of a given atom (other than hydrogen-like)?

The hydrogen spectral series is given by the Rydberg formula: The energy differences between levels in the Bohr model, and hence the wavelengths of emitted/absorbed photons, is given by the ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Wigner Threshold law in Photodetachment and Photoionization

I am writing this question here because I have a problem in understanding the Wigner Threshold law in Photodetachment and Photoionization. The Wigner Threshold Law is given by: $\sigma$=$E^{L+1/2}$. ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Stability of the hydrogen atom and positronium

I am trying to get a better understanding of why positronium decays while a hydrigen atom is stable. In the case of positronium, I can write an elementary process were the leptons annihilate into two ...
4
votes
2answers
271 views

Neil deGrasse Tyson says that electrons “teleport” between energy levels?

This page: https://blog.afach.de/?p=62 Discusses the error Neil deGrasse Tyson made when talking about electronic transitions (video included there). Tyson clearly said in his Cosmos series that ...
6
votes
2answers
987 views

Can I steal your electron?

The following paragraph has been extracted from the Wikipedia (Atomic orbitals): Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the ...
2
votes
3answers
81 views

What does the $y$-axis represent in the atomic spectra and what is its significance?

The picture is an emission spectrum of Helium. The spectrum has sharp lines (peaks) at certain wave lengths characterizing it as helium. Agreed that it characterizes Helium as atomic spectral line ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

What is it that makes an electron maintain a distance from the positively charged nucleus? [duplicate]

What is it that makes an electron maintain a distance from the positively charged nucleus? Why aren't electrons merely pulled into and absorbed by the nucleus ?
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Two-photon absorption and 3rd order susceptibility

I am referring to introduction of Section 12.5 Multiphoton Absorption and Multiphoton Ionization (Page no. 550 of Nonlinear Optics, Boyd-3rd edition) where it has been said that the two-photon ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Any simple reason why Helium in the ground state is diamagnetic?

I know the electrons are in the spin singlet state, and the spatial part of the wave function is an S-state. But that is not sufficient for it to be diamagnetic.
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Computing fine structure of terms in LS coupling,

In order to compute the fine structure of the terms in LS coupling (Russell-Saunders coupling), we must treat the hamiltonian $$H_2 = \sum_{\mbox{open subshells}} \xi(r_i) \vec{l_i}\cdot\vec{s_i}$$ ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Why photoelectron imaging is a 'complete' measurement?

In many articles and books, it says that photoelectron imaging gives a 'complete' information. What is mean by 'complete' measurement or a 'complete' information? Through photoelectron imaging ...
0
votes
3answers
108 views

Quantum mechanics scattering theory

When an electron absorbs energy and jumps to the another excited state by absorbing the photon and why it is always said that the electron will come back to $\hbar\omega/2$? Why doesn't the electron ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Coulomb potential in atoms other than hydrogen

The energy of an electron on $H$ atom is given by the formula: $-13.6 \; \text{eV}/n^2$. The constant value is born from $H$ dielectric constant and efective mass of the electron. My question is: ...
3
votes
0answers
76 views

What is a covalent bond?

What is a covalent bond, quantum mechanically? How does it hold the two atoms together, and at one point can you qualify the electron as being shated between two atoms, versus feeling attractive ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Covalent Bonds, Varities and Limits!

Related:http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/q/9459/ I was wondering, covalent bonds tend to share two electrons, apparently rarely more than three, and normally between two electrons. Can someone give ...
5
votes
1answer
229 views

Advanced atomic physics: From Liouville Equations to the Bloch equations

I'm trying to derive the Bloch equations from the Liouville equation. This should be possible according to this paper, where it discusses higher order Bloch equations (second order spherical tensors). ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Dipole and multipole bound state anions: Do these bound electrons behave exactly like conventional electrons in the molecular orbitals?

Recently, I read about dipole and multipole bound anions. Dipole bound anions are those, if I understood correctly, when an electron is attached electrostatically on a neutral molecule which is polar. ...
3
votes
3answers
146 views

Why are hydrogen energy levels degenerate in $\ell$ and $m$?

Is there a good physical picture of why the energy levels in a hydrogen atom are independent of the angular momentum quantum number $\ell$ and $m$?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Coulomb splitting in atomic physics

In atomic physics, if a configuration with equivalent electrons in some shell (say Neodymium : $[Xe] 6s^24f^4$) gives same $L = \sum_i l_i$ and $S = \sum_i s_i$ ($i$ denoting individual spin and ...
0
votes
2answers
151 views

What is wrong with the Bohr model?

What is wrong about the Bohr model? Many books say it is wrong but doesn't say why and I don't know why.
-1
votes
1answer
44 views

Accleration and frequency

Recently, I was taught by my sir that the Acceleration of an electron of Bohr Atom is equal to its frequency. I am confused and didnt understand why it turns out to be equal
2
votes
1answer
87 views

On use of Hamiltonians for Helium

The Hamiltonian of helium can be expressed as the sum of two hydrogen Hamiltonians and that of the Coulomb interaction of two electrons. $$\hat H = \hat H_1 + \hat H_2 + \hat H_{1,2}.$$ The wave ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Using the fine structure constant to measure atomic and molecular sizes

This is kind of a coursework question but it bring up some really interesting things about the fine structure constant $\alpha$ so I wanted to post it to not only make sure I understood something but ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Is it possible to find the hydrogen atom's radial wavefunctions?

Is there a way to actually find the equation of $R(r)$ without looking at a table with these equations already given? I'm given $n$, $\ell$, and $m$.
0
votes
3answers
104 views

Ground state of hydrogen atom

My interpretation: When we have no angular momentum, the potential well looks like this, my question is: How do you find the point where the wavefunction penetrates its classical forbidden region, ...
-1
votes
1answer
29 views

Atoms and their bonds in an explosion

I was watching a video and when the car did blow up I asked to me... what happens with the atoms and their bonds when an object blows up of this way? what is the behavior of the atoms and their bonds ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

How is ionization explained in Quantum Mechanics?

I remember in my highschool chemistry classes, they taught that an atom can be ionized when it loses a valence electron and becomes positively charged. In quantum mechanics, if electrons aren't really ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Mathematical description of electron configuration

Does there exist a mathematical model for determining the electron configuration of an atom? I mean the theory which would generalize the notion behind the informal elements of the Aufbau principle.
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Why do He-3 atoms repel each other much more strongly than electrons?

Is there a simple answer to this question ? see last line of this paragraph http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermionic_condensate#Fermionic_superfluids
2
votes
2answers
412 views

Calculating the most probable radius for an electron of a hydrogen atom in the ground state

This link describes a method for determining the most probable radius of an electron for a Hydrogen atom in the ground state. It states that : The radial probability density for the hydrogen ...
11
votes
5answers
1k views

How does the hydrogen atom know which frequencies it can emit photons at?

At university, I was shown the Schrodinger Equation, and how to solve it, including in the $1/r$ potential, modelling the hydrogen atom. And it was then asserted that the differences between the ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

The degeneracy of the ground state

I wonder how can i know the degeneracy of the ground state of certain elements? I'm doing Boltzmann distribution problems, and I'm not sure what to do. I have to calculate ratio of ions in 3p ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Electron distribution around atom when moving

I do not have much experience on this but if an atom has some electrons around nucleus and the atom itself it is moving at some speed does that affect the distribution of electrons around? I am ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Can scientists tell the energy levels of the atom?

In the hydrogen spectral series how did the scientists know the number of the energy level which the electron is moving from or to?
8
votes
5answers
624 views

What happens when we bring an electron and a proton together?

I have a couple of conceptual questions that I have always been asking myself. Suppose we have an electron and a proton at very large distance apart, with nothing in their way. They would feel each ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

Why is the orbital angular momentum of a pi electron along the axis of two atoms' molecule one?

I'm reading quantum chemistry. The book says that the orbital angular momentum of a $\pi$ electron along the symmetry axis of a molecule made up of two atoms is $\pm 1$. I think this is a primary ...