0
votes
0answers
31 views

Charge density within radius r from the nucleus

The probability of finding an electron within radius $r_b$ for Hydrogen near the center ($r_b<< a_0$) is approximately equal to zero (according to 1s orbital curve). Does this imply that the ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Question about one of the problems of the Bohr model

This is probably extremely basic physics that I don't know, but I'm still going to ask: Say in hydrogen, according to the Bohr model the electron is "really" orbiting the proton, and as a consequence ...
3
votes
0answers
36 views

Are the electric charges of an electron and a proton equal or approximately equal? [duplicate]

I read in Auletta's quantum mechanics (section 11.2) that the charge of the proton is, apart from the sign, approximately equal to that of the electron.. What ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

Reconciling electron subshell configurations and the Pauli exlcusion principle

I'd like to prefix this with an apology: I have no formal training in QP, and most of what I know has been obtained by reading Wikipedia. As such, it'd be really helpful if any answers took my lack of ...
8
votes
2answers
989 views

How does an electron move around in an orbital? Is it “wave-like” or random?

When an electron is moving around in it's orbital, is it actually moving around like a wave, like this video shows? (By wave-like, I mean, the "electron" in this video is showing it following a ...
2
votes
3answers
241 views

Why can't electrons fall into the nucleus?

I read a book on pop sci book on quantum mechanics and the author said that electrons do not fall into the nucleus due to quantum mechanics- which principles suggest this (I think it was Heisenberg's ...
3
votes
3answers
368 views

Negative energy levels in the diagram for a hydrogen atom

The higher the number of the shell (n), the higher is the energy level of the electron. However, why was it necessary to have negative values. So for example, when $n=1$, the energy could be $5 eV$ ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Can I steal your electron?

The following paragraph has been extracted from the Wikipedia (Atomic orbitals): Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the ...
65
votes
2answers
10k views

Why doesn't matter pass through other matter if atoms are 99.999% empty space?

The ghostly passage of one body through another is obviously out of the question if the continuum assumption were valid, but we know that at the micro, nano, pico levels (and beyond) this is not even ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Atomic Physics - Bohr's model of atom

Well I'm learning about the models that have been proposed for the atom, and the Bohr model came up. My teacher told me that the one of the main postulate of the theory is that when an atom is in ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Formation of atoms [closed]

If a Proton goes toward an Electron with a trajectory that forms a circular motion, these particles will form an atom ?
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Atomic physics question - exciting of electrons during bonding

As I have learnt, when bonding takes place in an atom, such as carbon, the electron in its $s$-subshell gets excited and jumps to the open spot in the $p$-subshell. This is why carbon is able to form ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

Do metals have their distinctive look because of the electron sea which surrounds the metal atoms?

are metals shiny because of the electron sea which surrounds the atomic lattice of the metal sample. are metals more shiny because the electron are more evenly distributed on the surface?
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Is an object's color/shine/texture dependent on its electrons only? If electrons are same then why are there so many different colors?

when we look at an object be it a metal or a non-metal are we looking at its electrons only, so then if all electrons are same then why do different chemicals or elements or objects have different ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Why photoelectron imaging is a 'complete' measurement?

In many articles and books, it says that photoelectron imaging gives a 'complete' information. What is mean by 'complete' measurement or a 'complete' information? Through photoelectron imaging ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Physics of a conductor gaining potential

Working on electrical engineering but thus far, the physics stack has proven to be a better place to read and ask questions in order to develop a better overall understanding. I am currently waist ...
2
votes
1answer
161 views

Why the orbital angular momentum equal zero for electron in s state? does it mean that the electron doesn't orbiting in s [duplicate]

Why is the orbital angular momentum $l$ equal to zero for electrons in the $s$ state? Does it mean that the electrons aren't actually orbiting?
2
votes
2answers
107 views

An electron in $s$ state

If an electron is in $s$ state, for example in 1s state for Hydrogen or 5s state for Silver atom, $\ell=0$. So,its total angular momentum $L$ is also equal to 0. So, what is electron actually doing in ...
9
votes
5answers
754 views

What happens when we bring an electron and a proton together?

I have a couple of conceptual questions that I have always been asking myself. Suppose we have an electron and a proton at very large distance apart, with nothing in their way. They would feel each ...
3
votes
1answer
168 views

Electrons skip randomly around their orbits

I read where the electron (as well as a few other particles) skips around in its orbit randomly rather than move around the orbit smoothly. This effect has been repeatedly observed in the laboratory ...
2
votes
2answers
172 views

What is the reason for the electrons in a given subshell to orient in certain preferred regions?

My text book says: "Magnetic quantum number describes the behavior of electron in a magnetic field. We know that the movement of electrical charge is always associated with magnetic field. Since ...
2
votes
1answer
530 views

Is it that electron of an atom can be found anywhere in the space?

Simple pictures showing orbital shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found. The diagrams cannot, ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What prevents an atom's electrons from “collapsing” onto its protons? [duplicate]

Forgive me if the answer to this is obvious. I have no formal physics training, and I remember that when I asked my physics teacher this, she just frowned and said "Good question." An electron is ...
-1
votes
1answer
162 views

Aren't all electrons the same? So what about electron that absorbs photon?

I learned that electron absorbs a photon and goes into higher energy state. But also all electrons are identical. What is a difference between the electron in low orbital energy state? and the high ...
1
vote
2answers
143 views

Stern-Gerlach and Hund's second rule

According to Hund's second rule, the spin tends to be maximal. That would, in my understanding, imply that, regarding the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the important electron in a silver atom has spin ...
1
vote
2answers
940 views

Continuous vs. Discrete Spectra in various materials

I read that the reason solids emit continuous spectra is that they don't have time to let their electrons decay-they are too close together. Given that electrons decay on the order of 100 nanoseconds ...
1
vote
4answers
609 views

How is the energy of an electron-shell related to the speed of electrons in that shell?

I am trying to gain an intuitive picture of what is referred to by "electron-shell energy". I have read that outer electron shells have higher energy than inner electron shells, and this seemed to ...
4
votes
0answers
84 views

Is it reasonable to interpret the Lamb shift as vacuum induced Stark shifts?

This is a pretty hand-wavy question about interpretation of the Lamb shift. I understand that one can calculate the Lamb shift diagrammatically to get an accurate result, but there exist ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Frequency of an Electron

My question is very simple. If frequency is defined as the cylces per unit time, Then what is meant by "Frequency of an Electron" ? If the rotation of electron around a nucleus is considered then, ...
5
votes
3answers
278 views

Do electrons in multi-electron atoms really have definite angular momenta?

Since the mutual repulsion term between electrons orbiting the same nucleus does not commute with either electron's angular momentum operator (but only with their sum), I'd assume that the electrons ...
3
votes
3answers
452 views

Can I move the atom nucleus only?

I was wondering if it is possible to move the atom nucleus and leave behind the electrons? I can imagine that the electrons will follow the nucleus. But what if the speed of the nucleus is almost the ...
2
votes
2answers
928 views

Is there a list of all atomic electron state transitions and the corresponding radiation emitted?

Here's a quote from Wikipedia: As an example, the ground state configuration of the sodium atom is 1s22s22p63s, as deduced from the Aufbau principle (see below). The first excited state is ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What keeps electrons in an atom from flying away or falling into the nucleus?

In atoms, what force or charge, etc. keeps electrons from flying away or into their nucleus? is there a kind of weak-force at work on the atomic scale? Note I am aware the electron positions are ...
8
votes
1answer
973 views

Why are noble gases used for lights?

I know that neon is used in advert signs due to its inertness. However, I am not entirely sure how the inertness is exploited. I think it is because Ne being inert means that after electricity frees ...