Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus. It is primarily concerned with the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus and the processes by which these arrangements change. This includes ions as well as neutral atoms and, ...

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variation of electrostatic potential on moving radially outwards from the nucleus of an atom

I was wondering how would the electrostatic potential change on moving radially outwards from the nucleus in an atom, considering the effect of the electron clouds around it.
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2answers
59 views

Would a piece of paper look as big as a small bedroom to an atom?, or bigger? [on hold]

A question my six yr old asked me this evening, how do I answer this? "Would a piece of paper look as big as this room to an atom?, or bigger?" ( This room being a ...
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1answer
229 views

Total orbital and spin angular momentum for a closed shell

I read one Phys.SE question similar to mine, in Total angular momentum in a full shell but the question was so confusing and vague. The answer, though, was helpful for me to understand a part of my ...
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2answers
39 views

Hydrogen Balmer Series

Hydrogen contains electron of n=1, Balmer Series requires electrons to jump from n=2 to n=3,4,5.... and again back to n=2. As n=2 is empty for Hydrogen atom, then how Balmer Series is formed for ...
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0answers
27 views

What are some of the failed experiments to determine electron's position? [closed]

One that I could think of is trying to observe it with the help of electromagnetic radiation which could tear apart the atom. I asked this because I want to know what sort of methods are used to ...
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1answer
26 views

When does electron capture occur and when does positron emission occur?

I’ve been told that electron capture occurs when there isn’t enough energy to produce a positron by beta plus decay. Exactly why is this the case? Why does it take more energy for positron emission ...
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0answers
41 views

Why do the quantum numbers take the value they do? [duplicate]

Clearly $n$ can take any positive integer value. But what is the physics and maths behind $l=0,1,...,n-1$ and $m_l=-l,-l+1,...,l-1,l$? i.e. where do these ranges of values come from? (P.S. I know ...
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0answers
24 views

How is it possible to combine various techniques in cold atom experiments?

I’ve been reading about laser-trapped cold atoms (6Li in particular, which is a fermion) and was amazed at the number of things to keep track of in the experiments, just to gain that degree of control ...
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3answers
58 views

Why does noble gas electron configuration have low energy?

In chemistry classes in primary school we learned that atoms "want" to reach noble gas configuration because it have low energy, so atoms on the left of the periodic table are willing to give away ...
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0answers
35 views

Why do atoms oscillate? [closed]

We say, atoms are in constant motion. The question is why they are in motion. I think they are continuing the motion because there is no frictional force to decay the motion. But what causes the ...
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2answers
20 views

Excitation of paired electrons in electron orbitals

When we consider the electron orbitals each orbital can have a single electron or an electron pair each with opposite spin. Are all electrons always in pairs except the final single one if odd number ...
4
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1answer
40 views

Can an electron in an atom have insufficient energy to achieve an energy level, or orbital, and what happens to this electron when this occurs?

If a nucleus undergoes a change in Z or Mass due decay or absorption, could this disrupt the electrons from their orbital/shell energy levels? If so, could the electrons that were previously in the ...
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0answers
15 views

Effect of nucleus geometry and states on the Coulomb barrier and the electric potential well surrounding the nucleus

In some models of the nucleus it has a geometric aspect due to the combination and alignments of the charges, magnetic moments and spins of the protons and neutrons it contains. Even in models that ...
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0answers
15 views

Can a light element with excited nucleus undergo internal conversion

Internal conversion occurs when an excited nucleus ejects a low level electron from the first 2 low energy shells such as a k shell electron instead of emitting gamma when returning to ground state. ...
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0answers
14 views

Does the mass of a nucleus increase when it is excited to higher energy levels

If we consider an atomic nucleus that is excited to a higher energy level. This maybe due to absorption of gamma for example or as a result of some other decay or interaction. Would the mass of that ...
2
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5answers
139 views

How to explain what an electron is to someone new to physics? [closed]

I've got asked by someone who just graduated school and is about to start studying physics, what exactly is an electron, if it is not "a small ball rotating around the core of an atom". I couldn't ...
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1answer
57 views

Why do electrons occupy in discrete energy states?

Why can't there be any continuous energy band in an atom?
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7answers
300 views

Quantization vs. continuous energy levels

I still don't get what it means for atomic energy levels to be continuous or quantitized (incontinuous). Clearing this up will really help me. Also, can anyone tell me why energy levels in solids are ...
3
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2answers
59 views

Effect on electron shells energy levels during nuclear decay

First thanks for this great site. I was recently looking at photon emission from electron transitions from excited electron states in atoms. For simplicity I was using the Rutherford Bohr Model and ...
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0answers
13 views

Coupling schemes

If it is multi electron system LS or JJ coupling schemes are used to evaluate total angular momentum (J value). Now my doubt, whether we have to consider all electrons or electrons in the outermost ...
0
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1answer
24 views

How fast can a fluorescent lamp flicker

Using electronic ballasts, the current frequency is boosted up to 60 kHz in some models. Does the fluorescent lamp continue to flicker at that frequency or does it produce continuous light? In this ...
2
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2answers
42 views

How are determined experimentally the energy levels of the atoms ? How is the calibration done to several decimal points?

I see discrepancy for the absorption edges for the atoms in the X-ray ? For example K-absorption edge of carbon can be anywhere between 282 to 284eV according to different sources. My question is ...
2
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0answers
35 views

Why Electron Does Not Radiate In Bohr Orbits? [duplicate]

Maxwell said that charged particles radiate when are in accelarating motion. I understand that $nλ=2πr$ must be fulfilled in order to create a sinusoidal standing wave and to satisfy the probability ...
3
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2answers
173 views

Quantum mechanics and the atom

I was thinking about the nature of the atom, specifically, why electrons do not spiral into the nucleus. My physics book says the principal quantum number $n$ must be an integer number of wave ...
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0answers
24 views

Is density of an element directly proportional to atomic number or atomic weight? [duplicate]

Is the density of an element directly proportional to any power/order of atomic weight or atomic number? I know very less, probably only highschool level physics, after which my brain has been ...
36
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3answers
6k views

In atomic bomb tests under ground, where does the volume of the rocks go?

Underground atomic bomb tests are done in a deep, sealed hole. Not all underground tests eject material on the surface. In this case, they are only noticeable as earthquakes, according to german ...
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0answers
46 views

Electron energy in magnetic field

For a problem early in a book I'm reading (Quantum Mechanics by Albert Messiah), I'm asked the following: Consider an electron following a circular trajectory in a constant magnetic field $H$ (I'm ...
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0answers
28 views

Oscillation - atoms [closed]

A homogeneous, spherical electron cloud describes an atom (radius $a_0$ and total charge $^-e$ and positive point charge $^+e$ as the nucleus. An external electric field stimulates the electron ...
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0answers
19 views

Can I use the Chi squared test to see if my data fit to the Wigner-Dyson distribution indicating chaotic behaviour? [migrated]

I recently read the paper about Quantum Chaos in Feshbach resonance spectra of ultracold Erbium [1]. The authors analyze their data statistically using the random matrix theory framework for ...
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1answer
47 views

Theoretical proof of the Bohr's postulates

It was proved in an experimental way that the energy of a photon equals $E = h \nu$ electrons radii satisfy the equation $mvr = n \hbar$ Is it possible to prove these properties in a theoretical ...
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3answers
66 views

Two questions about Variational Method of quantum mechanics

I have two question about variational method of quantum mechanics. Why we always find the ground state energy by this approach. Why not the other excited states? When we find the ground state energy ...
3
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1answer
114 views

Observation of gauge in artificial magnetic fields

In the ultracold atom community, an "artificial gauge field" or "artificial magnetic field" is a spatially varying hopping phase somehow engineered into the system, so that atoms hopping around an ...
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1answer
24 views

During transition of the electron from high to low energy state, is the photon released always of same energy?

Is it not possible that during transition of an electron from higher to lower energy state, it can release multiple photons of low energy instead of a single photon of the exact energy difference ...
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0answers
30 views

What does 'easily reversed' mean in the NIST spectral database? [closed]

Cross posted to http://engineering.stackexchange.com/q/3303/ I'm trying to do some processing of optical emission spectra from sputtering plasmas, and am confused by what NIST means by 'easily ...
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3answers
84 views

Having trouble understanding spectral lines

In my notes I wrote that Rutherford's model of the atom could not explain spectral lines, because that is what my textbook says. I'm not really sure about the details of spectral lines though. I know ...
0
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1answer
21 views

First few energy Levels in Iridium?

I've been learning a bit of x-ray spectra on the side. I know that Iridium has Z = 77, and I am trying to plot out the first 4 energy levels. I learnt that electrons are filled up as ...
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0answers
11 views

Hyperfine structure interval rule only obeyed approximately?

The hyperfine interaction is given by $\Delta E = A \langle I \cdot J \rangle = \frac{A}{2}\left[ F(F+1) - I(I+1) - J(J+1) \right]$. The interval rule is given by: $$ \frac{\Delta E_{F,F-1}}{\Delta ...
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0answers
16 views

Radial excitation and orbital-angular momentum excitation

Sorry. Just want to make sure, but what does radial excitation and orbital-angular excitation mean in the context of bound states? Just higher $n$ and $\ell$ quantum number?
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1answer
26 views

Is the 21cm line of hyperfine structure hydrogen an allowed transition?

The ground state of hydrogen is $^{2}S_{\frac{1}{2}}$ with nuclear spin $I=\frac{1}{2}$. The levels are split by $F=1,F=0$. By the rules of electric dipole transition, $\Delta l = \pm 1$. But in this ...
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2answers
25 views

Why do the size of gaps/energy between different energy levels of mercury Hg vary as it goes further away from the mercury atom?

In hydrogen, the gap is getting increasing smaller, this is understandable: there will not be as much energy released as it goes down, and as attraction gets weaker. But in mercury the ordering is ...
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1answer
46 views

Would Hund's rules still be valid if the electron had spin 3/2?

One of my homework assignments in atomic physics was the following: Given electrons had a Spin of $S = 3/2$, what would be the number of the first 4 noble gasses (complete shells)? The obvious ...
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0answers
37 views

Laser output below, just above and way above threshold?

I've been reading up on lasers recently and learnt that within the cavity while the laser light is amplified by the gain coefficient, it loses power due to transmission and absorption. Suppose the ...
1
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1answer
36 views

What is the difference between the phase in molecular orbitals and the actual complex phase component of the wave function?

You often see in atomic and molecular physics texts that bonding occurs between two atomic orbitals when their wave functions are in phase. These pictures often depict the 'phase' as whether or not ...
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0answers
50 views

If 99% of an atom empty, and our body is made of atoms, does that mean 99% of our body is empty? [duplicate]

If 99% of an atom empty, and if we say that our body is made of atoms stacked together, then why is our body a solid object, rather than 99% hollow. I have one probable answer that I think might be ...
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1answer
63 views

Is this definition of orthohelium and parahelium incorrect?

"One electron is presumed to be in the ground state, the 1s state. An electron in an upper state can have spin antiparallel to the ground state electron ($S=0$, singlet state, parahelium) or ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

How much space does an atom occupy? [closed]

So my stupid question is: we know that in the classical model of a atom there is a nucleus at the middle and electron revolving around it in orbits numbered from 0 to infinity. So according to this an ...
11
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3answers
2k views

When an atom is split, what form of energy is released?

When an atom is split, what form of energy is released? All of the websites I have looked at say there is a lot of energy released when an atom is split, but it never says what form of energy it is ...
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25 views

Slope of p-orbitals at the nucleus

Is there any analytic expression describing the slope of the p-orbital at the nucleus, for example for hydrogen.
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0answers
61 views

Driving $\sigma$ transition with light in superposition of $\pi_x$ and $\pi_y$ polarization of slightly different frequencies

Lets assume the following experiment. Circularly polarized laser light is sent through a Mach-Zender interferometer $\left(l_1 = l_2 \sim \,\mathrm{cm}\right)$ made up of polarizing beam splitters ...
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2answers
92 views

Why does Bohr's stationary orbits not radiate energy? [duplicate]

I am presently in high school trying to understand the Bohr's theory. I somewhat familiar with Maxwell's laws but very soon I'll learn about them thoroughly. So please could anyone explain with ...