Analogous to matter, but with charge of the particles opposite to their ordinary matter counterparts.

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44
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7answers
34k views

Is anti-matter matter going backwards in time?

Or: can it be proved that anti-matter definitely is nót matter going backwards in time? From wikipedia: There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is apparently almost ...
33
votes
3answers
6k views

What happens when anti-matter falls into a black hole?

Let's say a black hole of mass $M$ and a very compact lump of anti-matter (not a singularity) also of mass $M$ are traveling toward each other. What does an outside observer see when they meet? Will ...
29
votes
3answers
5k views

How would we tell antimatter galaxies apart?

Given that antimatter galaxies are theoretically possible, how would they be distinguishable from regular matter galaxies? That is, antimatter is equal in atomic weight and all properties, except for ...
29
votes
1answer
1k views

How close does a particle-antiparticle pair need to be for annihilation to happen?

I've most often seen the statement that the annihilation of a particle and its antiparticle occurs when they 'collide' with one another. So in other words when they get very close to one another ...
28
votes
2answers
802 views

Identification of particles and anti-particles

The identification of an electron as a particle and the positron as an antiparticle is a matter of convention. We see lots of electrons around us so they become the normal particle and the rare and ...
27
votes
3answers
7k views

Do anti-photons exist?

I know what anti-matter is and how when it collides with matter both are annihilated. However, what about anti-photons? Are there such things as anti-photons? I initially thought the idea ...
26
votes
5answers
3k views

Will 1 gram of matter moving at relativistic speeds completely annihilate a larger quantity of stationary antimatter?

This is a question about the relativistic mass concept which I am having trouble understanding, mainly because of the scenario below. Simple scenario: Suppose 1 gram of matter is accelerated to 99% ...
24
votes
4answers
2k views

Why do or don't neutrinos have antiparticles?

This was inspired by this question. According to Wikipedia, a Majorana neutrino must be its own antiparticle, while a Dirac neutrino cannot be its own antiparticle. Why is this true?
23
votes
5answers
2k views

Does antimatter curve spacetime in the opposite direction as matter?

According to the Dirac equation, antimatter is the negative energy solution to the following relation: $$E^2 = p^2 c^2 + m^2 c^4.$$ And according to general relativity, the Einstein tensor (which ...
23
votes
2answers
615 views

Experimental observation of matter/antimatter in the universe

Ordinary matter and antimatter have the same physical properties when it comes to, for example, spectroscopy. Hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms produce the same spectroscopy when excited, and adsorb the ...
23
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3answers
1k views

Has the gravitational interaction of antimatter ever been examined experimentally?

I know that the gravitational interaction of antimatter is expected to be the same as normal matter. But my question is, has it ever been experimentally validated? I think it would not be a trivial ...
22
votes
3answers
13k views

What exactly is an anti-neutrino?

According to the the definition of anti-particles, they are particles with same mass but opposite charge. Neutrinos by definition have no charge. So, how can it have an anti-particle?
19
votes
3answers
2k views

No hair theorem for black holes and the baryon number

The no hair theorem says that a black hole can be characterized by a small number of parameters that are visible from distance - mass, angular momentum and electric charge. For me it is puzzling why ...
17
votes
4answers
1k views

What is anti-matter?

Matter-- I guess I know what it is ;) somehow, at least intuitively. So, I can feel it in terms of the weight when picking something up. It may be explained by gravity which is itself is defined by ...
17
votes
1answer
626 views

In general what will holding an anti-hydrogen atom for more than a 1/10th of second allow scientists to discover?

In general what will holding an anti-hydrogen atom for more than a 1/10th of second allow scientists to discover? Specifically, given that they can hold one for <1/10th of a second, what would ...
16
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there any antimatter that exists as atoms?

I recently read a few things that implied that there is antimatter that we know of (have created?) that exists as atoms - which I guess means positrons and antiprotons bound together, at least. Is ...
15
votes
6answers
2k views

Is there any way to annihilate matter without the use of anti-matter?

Is there any way to annihilate matter without the use of anti-matter? And vice versa? I mean, for example is it possible to totally convert the mass of a proton into "pure energy" without use an ...
15
votes
4answers
2k views

Could we make things out of newly discovered particles?

Right now, all of the "stuff" that has been created in the world is made of protons, electrons, and neutrons. I'm aware that particles other than these have much shorter lifetimes. But I've also heard ...
15
votes
1answer
1k views

How would one detect antihydrogen in the universe?

Since the spectra of hydrogen and antihydrogen are the same, how do astronomers know which one they're detecting? Is, perhaps, the Lamb shift in antihydrogen different?
13
votes
5answers
679 views

Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry in Experiments?

As I hope is obvious to everyone reading this, the universe contains more matter than antimatter, presumably because of some slight asymmetry in the amounts of the two generated during the Big Bang. ...
12
votes
2answers
4k views

If atoms never “physically” touch each others, then how does matter-antimatter annihilation happen?

It is known that matter and antimatter annihilate each other when they "touch" each other. And as far as I know, the concept of "touching" as our brain gets it is not true on the atomic level since ...
12
votes
2answers
740 views

How does Annihilation work?

How does annihilation work? I'm wondering why matter and antimatter actually annihilates if they come into contact. What exactly happens? Is that a known process? Is it just because of their different ...
12
votes
1answer
2k views

Anti particles: What exactly is inverted?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiparticle says "Corresponding to most kinds of particles, there is an associated antiparticle with the same mass and opposite electric charge." and What is anti-matter? ...
12
votes
5answers
2k views

Anti-Matter Black Holes

Assuming for a second that there were a pocket of anti matter somewhere sufficiently large to form all the type of object we can see forming from normal matter - then one of these objects would be a ...
11
votes
1answer
553 views

Why is the charmed eta meson its own antiparticle, but the neutral kaon is not?

I have a limited understanding of antiparticles, so this may be why I am unable to explain why certain mesons are their own antiparticles, while others are not. My understanding is that antiparticles ...
11
votes
3answers
568 views

Are there really left-chiral particles?

A chiral eigenstate is always a linear combination of a particle and an antiparticle state and a particle or antiparticle state is always a linear combination of chiral eigenstates. Now, how can we ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

What was missing in Dirac's argument to come up with the modern interpretation of the positron?

When Dirac found his equation for the electron $(-i\gamma^\mu\partial_\mu+m)\psi=0$ he famously discovered that it had negative energy solutions. In order to solve the problem of the stability of the ...
10
votes
3answers
993 views

What happens to gravity after matter-antimatter annihilation?

Both matter and antimatter have mass and thus gravity, but since energy from annihilation has no mass what happens to the force of gravity that was previously present? What about conservation of ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

Neutron to antiproton decay

Would it be possible for a neutron to lose a positron and become an antiproton? Or would would it need to be the decay of an antineutron to antiproton instead?
10
votes
2answers
2k views

How Did Paul Dirac Predict The Existence of Antiproton?

The existence of the antiproton with -1 electric charge, opposite to the +1 electric charge of the proton, was predicted by Paul Dirac in his 1933 Nobel Prize lecture. Quotation by Wikipedia. ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

If matter and antimatter repel, how do we know other galaxies aren't made of antimatter? [duplicate]

Wikipedia's article on antimatter says this: There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is composed almost entirely of ordinary matter, as opposed to a more even mixture ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Does a particle annihilate only with its antiparticle? If yes, why?

Or to put the question another way - what is the result of a proton-positron collision, or an up quark-charm antiquark collision, etc.? As far as I know, annihilation happens only between particles of ...
10
votes
3answers
463 views

Are there models/simulations of antigravitational antimatter-galaxies?

In the comments to another question's answer, I started wondering: Assuming antimatter possessed negative gravitational mass§ (which is not proven impossible to date, though deemed unlikely), ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

What actually happens when an anti-matter projectile collides with matter?

I'm trying to understand what would really happen when large quantities (e.g., 10g) of anti-matter collide with matter. The normal response is that they'd annihilate each other and generate an ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

How is it possible to store antimatter?

Antimatter is simply the opposite of regular matter and will destroy itself and any regular matter it contacts in a flash of raw energy, emitting radiation. Now somehow, scientists have been able to ...
9
votes
3answers
246 views

What exactly “triggers” a matter/antimatter detonation?

I know that when matter touches antimatter, they both explode and turn into energy. However, by my understanding, atoms don't really touch; their nuclei don't physically contact each other, since ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Anti-matter as matter going backwards in time? (requesting further clarification upon a previous post)

I understand this question has already been asked here, however, I don't have enough reputation points to place a comment (I suppose that's the reason) on a specific answer to request a reference. A ...
9
votes
1answer
356 views

Baryogenesis only at the Planck scale, or none at all?

I can think of three general ways of explaining why the universe contains more matter than antimatter: (1) Near the Planck time, the universe had zero baryon asymmetry, but at some later time, ...
9
votes
5answers
3k views

Why Negative Energy States are Bad

The argument is often given that the early attempts of constructing a relativistic theory of quantum mechanics must not have gotten everything right because they led to the necessity of negative ...
8
votes
4answers
10k views

What is “pure energy” in matter-antimatter annihilation made of?

I used to read the term "pure energy" in the context of matter-antimatter annihilation. Is the "pure energy" spoken of photons? Is it some form of heat? Some kind of particles with mass? ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion? [duplicate]

If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion?
8
votes
2answers
921 views

Practical uses of antimatter in the present

I recently found out that a PET scan stands for a positron emission tomography. Are there any other practical uses of antimatter in the present?
8
votes
1answer
308 views

Why is the decay of neutral kaons (violates CP invariance) seemingly not sufficient enough for certain people to describe matter-antimatter imbalance?

The Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980 was awarded to James Cronin and Val Fitch for their discovery of a violation of Charge and Parity Invariance, in which the neutral kaon's quarks change into their ...
8
votes
2answers
835 views

the causality and the anti-particles

How can I quantitatively and qualitatively understand the fact that there is a relevence between the existence of anti-particles and the causality?
8
votes
1answer
503 views

How fast is the matter and antimatter reaction compared to nuclear chain reaction?

What I mean is, the nuclear chain reactions take microseconds for every generation and that is the reason that nuclear weapons exist. Because in nuclear reactors the reaction rate is much slower thus ...
8
votes
1answer
263 views

Is the pH of antimatter the reverse of the pH for matter?

If it does have a pH, I mean. Though I don't see why it shouldn't have it. Both the Brønsted-Lowry and Lewis definitions of acid have to do with the ability of a substance to accept, or provide ...
8
votes
2answers
431 views

How come the universe is made of matter and not antimatter?

Antimatter is like matter on opposite day: it has the same properties as the stuff that makes up planets, stars and galaxies, but one vital piece is different—its charge. The universe supposedly ...
7
votes
1answer
492 views

Antimatter Propulsion System

Is there a possibility ( in theory ) to build a antimatter propulsion system, if so how can we control the collision of matter-anitmatter, will humans be able to control this force just like ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Do particles and anti-particles attract each other?

Do particles and anti-particles attract each other? From the very basic understanding that they are created out of nothing mutually and collide to annihilate each other seems to indicate this happens ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Why would Antimatter behave differently via Gravity?

Confinement of antihydrogen might help provide a future answer. http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.4982