This tag is for anomalies in a symmetry, either in classical or quantum theories. This tag should **not** be used for anomalies in a measurement.

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What exactly is a gauge anomaly?

In lots of papers I read about gauge anomalies. For example, avoiding gauge anamolies in the MSSM is the reason for introducing an extra Higgs doublet. Gauge anamolies in the Standard Model are ...
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Choice of basis for Fujikawa method to derive chiral anomaly

I am studying the Fujikawa method of determining the chiral anomalies in a $U(1)$ theory. As we know the basis vectors selected are the eigenstates of the Dirac operator. One of the reasons given is ...
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A question about the Henningson-Skenderis holographic Weyl anomaly calculation.

I am referring to this very famous paper. http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/9806087 I am referring to equations 20 and 27 and 28. Anyone can help derive them? I vaguely think that they substituted ...
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191 views

Conformal/trace anomaly and index theorem

I am reading the chapters on characteristic classes and the index theorems in Nakahara. It is proven in the text that any chiral or gravitational anomaly $\mathcal{A}$ is given by $$\mathcal{A}=\int ...
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Anomalies from a Renormaization Group Equation (RGE)

This is an approach to anomalies which seems unfamiliar to me.. Firstly what is this function $W$ which seems to satisfy the equation, $\frac{\partial W }{\partial g^{\mu \nu} } = \langle T_{\mu ...
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Why is the chiral symmetry $SU(2)_A$ not anomalous?

Using Fujikawa's path integral treatment of the triangle diagram, one can show that $$\mathrm{Tr} \gamma^5 = \int d^4 x\ \partial_{\mu}j^{\mu} $$ Where $j^{\mu}$ is the Noether current of $U(1)_A$. ...
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67 views

$P$ symmetry that is apparent with one definition of fields but not with another

Suppose that we have a Lagrangian density like $$\mathcal L = -\frac{1}{4} \operatorname{tr} F_{\mu\nu}F^{\mu\nu} + \frac{\theta}{32\pi^2} \operatorname{tr} \big( \epsilon^{\mu\nu\rho\sigma} ...
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Hamiltonian Operator Interpretation of Quantum Anomaly

We can see the definition of quantum anomaly in terms of Lagrangian path integral formulation. What is the definition of quantum anomaly in terms of Hamiltonian operator approach or even more directly ...
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Help in deriving the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly

I'm stuck on the derivation of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly. This is discussed on page 666 of Peskin and Schroeder (equation 19.76) or these notes on page 14 (equation 39). According to these ...
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90 views

Quantum Anomalies for Bosons

We know that there is Adler and Bell-Jackiw(ABJ) type anomalies for fermions. In some case, the ABJ anomaly affecs particle physics pheonomelogy, such as pion decays or kaon decays(in the case of ...
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Global anomaly for discrete groups

We know that: a global anomaly is a type of anomaly: in this particular case, it is a quantum effect that invalidates a large gauge transformations that would otherwise be preserved in the ...
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+100

Symmetries of the Standard Model: exact, anomalous, spontaneously broken

There are a number of possible symmetries in fundamental physics, such as: Lorentz invariance (or actually, Poincaré invariance, which can itself be broken down into translation invariance and ...
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Anomaly cancellation and fermion number violation

In the standard model, an axial $SU(3)$ currents has anomaly which after quantization leads to the fermion number violation. However, taking all the fermions into account we note that the anomalies ...
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Zumino's consistent and covariant anomalies - applied to quantum hall?

What is the `physical' meaning of consistent anomalies and covariant anomalies? Perhaps a good Reference is: Consistent and covariant anomalies in gauge and gravitational theories - William A. ...
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155 views

Some fundamental results in QFTs [closed]

In quantum theory we have some principles that guides us, e.g. Pauli's principle. What I am after in this question is a list of fundamental results, be it equation or identities that must hold in a ...
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For the $U(1)$ problem, is the Kugo and Ojima Goldstone quartet wrong?

On page 96 in "Local Covariant Operator Formalism of Non-Abelian Gauge Theories and Quark Confinement Problem", Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. 66 (1979) 1, KO state the following: Finally we should ...
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Anomalous dimensions in the $O(N)$ model

Is there any statement known about the anomalous dimensions of the $O(N)$ model in various dimensions and/or in the large-N limit? If a $\phi^4$ ("double-trace") term is coupled to an $O(N)$ model ...
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1answer
152 views

Ambiguity in Beta Functions (2-loop)

Beyond one-loop, the beta function of a QFT is scheme dependent. I would like to understand better this ambiguity. The easiest thing to say is that you haven't calculated something physical, so of ...
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185 views

Anomalies and Modification of symmetry algebra

This question is motivated by 2-dimensional CFTs where the Classical conformal group (defined by the Witt algebra) is modified to the Virasoro algebra in the quantum theory. In this question, it was ...
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290 views

Central charge in a $d=2$ CFT

I've always been confused by this very VERY basic and important fact about two-dimensional CFTs. I hope I can get a satisfactory explanation here. In a classical CFT, the generators of the conformal ...
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237 views

Quantum Anomalies in Non-Gauge Theories?

I'm reading about quantum anomalies in QFT and all the examples seem to arise in gauge theories. Is it true that theories without a local gauge invariance don't have quantum anomalies? I can't think ...
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Anomalies for not-on-site discrete gauge symmetries

If a symmetry group $G$ (let's say finite for simplicity) acts on a lattice theory by acting only on the vertex variables, I will call it ultralocal. Any ultralocal symmetry can be gauged. However, in ...
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About the general expression of trace anomaly and CFT partition functions

I have put up a question here, http://mathoverflow.net/questions/139685/proof-of-the-general-expression-for-anomaly-in-a-cft-and-its-partition-function Here I am putting up a slightly different ...
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735 views

The phrase “Trace Anomaly” seems to be used in two different ways. What's the relation between the two?

I've seen the phrase "Trace Anomaly" refer to two seemingly different concepts, though I assume they must be related in some way I'm not seeing. The first way I've seen it used is in the manner, for ...
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397 views

Why does tachyon arise in bosonic string theory?

I am looking for precise mathematical and physical reasons which cause the presence of tachyon in bosonic string theory(specially closed bosonic string theory). Has it to do with the specific form of ...
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On the Axial Anomaly

I know that if we start with a massive theory, the chiral states $L$ and $R$ remain coupled to each other in the massless limit. Because a charged Dirac particle of a given helicity can make a ...
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Is this explanation of “Why nine space dimensions?” correct?

In Gordon Kane's Supersymmetry and Beyond (p. 118), he states: String theory has to be formulated in nine space dimensions or it is not a consistent mathematical theory. There doesn't seem to be a ...
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Critical dimension in quantization of p-branes

So I have what might be a fairly basic question, but my understanding that in the quantization of the the string, or the 1-brane, there are conditions on the number of spacetime dimensions to ensure ...
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463 views

Homotopy $\pi_4(SU(2))=\mathbb{Z}_2$

Recently I read a paper using $$\pi_4(SU(2))=\mathbb{Z}_2.$$ Do you have any visualization or explanation of this result? More generally, how do physicists understand or calculate high dimension ...
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365 views

why are two higgs doublets required in SUSY?

I can't really understand why two higgs doublets are required in SUSY. From the literature, I have found opaque explanations that say something along the lines of: the superpotential W must be a ...
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1answer
297 views

Chiral anomaly in odd spacetime dimensions

In odd number of space-time dimensions, the Fermions are not reducible (i.e. do not have left-chiral and right-chiral counterparts). Does this mean that there is no such thing as 'chiral' anomalies ...
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Why does renormalization need an unbroken symmetry?

Common wisdom is that for a QFT to be renormalizable it must be invariant under a symmetry transformation. Why does renormalization need an unbroken symmetry? Which is the first publication that ...
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simple explanation of chiral anomaly?

Can somebody provide a fairly brief explanation of what the chiral anomaly is? I have been unable to find a concise reference for this. I know QFT at the P&S level so don't be afraid to use math.
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If gauge symmetries are fake, then why do we care if they are anomalous?

My understanding is that gauge symmetries are fake in that they are only redundancies of our description of the system that we put in (either knowingly or unknowingly) see Gauge symmetry is not a ...
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308 views

what is the relationship between these two sorts of anomalies?

Recently there has been a few questions about anomalies in QFTs: Why do some anomalies (only) lead to inconsistent quantum field theories Classical and quantum anomalies In these, people have been ...
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755 views

Why do some anomalies (only) lead to inconsistent quantum field theories

In connection with Classical and quantum anomalies, I'd like to ask for a simple explanation why some anomalies lead to valid quantum field theories while some others (happily absent in the standard ...
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Classical and quantum anomalies

I have read about anomalies in different contexts and ways. I would like to read an explanation that unified all these statements or point-views: Anomalies are due to the fact that quantum field ...
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Relation among anomaly, unitarity bound and renormalizability

There is something I'm not sure about that has come up in a comment to other question: Why do we not have spin greater than 2? It's a good question--- the violation of renormalizability is linked ...
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3answers
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Why does string theory require 9 dimensions of space and one dimension of time?

String theorists say that there are many more dimensions out there, but they are too small to be detected. However, I do not understand why there are ten dimensions and not just any other number? ...
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504 views

Chiral anomalies à la Fujikawa: Why don't we just take another measure?

When deriving the chiral anomaly in the non perturbative approach for a theory of massless Dirac fermions, you start by showing that the path-integral measure is not invariant unter the chiral ...
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Instantons, anomalies, and 1-loop effects

A symmetry is anomalous when the path-integral measure does not respect it. One way this manifests itself is in the inability to regularize certain diagrams containing fermion loops in a way ...
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928 views

Chiral anomaly and decay of the pion

I am told that if all classical symmetries were reflected as quantum symmetries, the decay of the neutral pion $$\pi^0 ~\longrightarrow~ \gamma\gamma$$ would not happen. Why would the conservation of ...
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Descent equation and anomaly polynomial

I am just reading Ryu, Moore and Ludwig's paper on classifications of topological insulators and quantum anomaly. They are trying to relate the quantum anomaly as a signal of the presence of a ...