9
votes
2answers
609 views

Dynamics of counter-rotating flywheels

I've wondered about this for ages. If we create a pair of flywheels that rotate in the opposite direction with the same angular momentum, but are co-located and have the same mass and inertial moment ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Why does angular velocity lies in the axis passing through the center of the circumference?

I understand that it can't be placed anywhere on the radius because it doesn't vary with it ( and so of course it doens't make sense to place it anywhere else on the plane), but why do we place it ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Slowdown rate of rotating body due to friction force [closed]

This isn't a homework question, but it might as well be. The problem I have been pondering is: If a disc (or children's roundabout if you like), of radius r, mass m, is spun around it's center ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Does Earth's Rotation Affect Its Shape?

The question I am working on is, "Consider the following. (a) Find the angular speed of Earth's rotation about its axis. rad/s (b) How does this rotation affect the shape of Earth?" I am fully ...
0
votes
2answers
772 views

Vector Nature Of Angular Velocity

I am currently reading about angular position, angular velocity, and angular acceleration. I came across this paragraph that was particularly confusing, and was wondering if someone could perhaps help ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Applying angular velocity to a rotation matrix

I have a very simple question. In our project we store an object's orientation as a 3x3 matrix which holds the orthonormal base of that object's local space. For instance if the object is aligned with ...
1
vote
1answer
323 views

Finding stopping time when only given initial angular velocity and an expression for angular acceleration?

Question: A wheel starts is spinning at $27\text{ rad/s}$ but is slowing with an angular acceleration that has a magnitude given by $\alpha(t) = (3.0\;\mathrm{rad/s^4})t^2$. It stops in a time ...
8
votes
5answers
2k views

How is it that angular velocities are vectors, while rotations aren't?

Does anyone have an intuitive explanation of why this is the case?