Aircraft are man-made vehicles intended to operate while flying through Earth's atmosphere.

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Hot Air Balloons: how is the Lift related to environmental conditions?

I'd like to build a small hot air balloon big enough to carry 0.8kg (a camera). The first thing I need to know is: once I have a big enough plastic bag and a big enough source of fire, how much will ...
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0answers
31 views

Remote control wireless helicopter hovering in cruising aircraft, will it move the aircraft with stability [duplicate]

A Mini Toy Helicopter is left for hovering inside the cabin of an Aircraft, while the aircraft is cruising at the speed of 900 Km/h. Helicopter has no contact with the surface of the aircraft. The ...
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2answers
487 views

Extracting acceleration vector from rotated aircraft

Suppose we have an aircraft with accelerometer measuring accelerations along each axis. It is mounted in a way so it is perpendicular to the plane in all axes (that should be obvious). We also have ...
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3answers
2k views

Flying a toy helicopter inside an accelerating train [duplicate]

Scenario: You ride in a train, you have this helicopter toy. The train is not yet running when you flew your helicopter on a constant altitude (say 1 meter above the train's floor). Question: What ...
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3answers
931 views

Effective angle of attack of a wing

Is the angle of attack of a rectangular wing influenced by the dihedral ($\Gamma$) of the wing? If e.g. a wing exists with $\Gamma$ = 0$^{o}$ it has angle of attack $\alpha$. If the dihedral is set ...
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Why can't supersonic planes “just fly higher” to go faster while maintaining cost?

First post to this site, and I've got at most a high school background in physics - I really appreciate any answer, but I may not be able to follow you if you're too advanced. I suppose this goes for ...
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1answer
156 views

How much energy is consumed by a aircraft to maintain a speed of sound? [closed]

Let's assume that the aircraft is 1000kg and it is flying in a air density of 1.225kg/m^3 at the speed of sound in air. Just how much energy does it require per second to maintain flying at this ...
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4answers
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Does the rotation of the earth dramatically affect airplane flight time?

Say I'm flying from Sydney, to Los Angeles (S2LA), back to Sydney (LA2S). During S2LA, travelling with the rotation of the earth, would the flight time be longer than LA2S on account of Los Angeles ...
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1answer
364 views

why can't you use your cellphone on an airplane? [closed]

why airplanes are banned with use of cellphones? What were the impacts while we answer an call or make an call ,what was the physical reason behind the ban of using cellphone inside airplanes ? I ...
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1answer
195 views

Application of plasma actuators for flow control of moving objects

I've recently been to a converence on plasma physics were, to my surprise, a lot of presentations were concerned with plasma actuator. Could someone, preferably in the field, tell me how long people ...
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2answers
210 views

Will a helicoper which is hovering inside a closed box move with the box when we move it? [duplicate]

I got this micro helicopter to play with, you know that cheap double bladed ones you can find for $25 or so. Anyway last night I was on bed trying to sleep and I got this idea, what if we put the ...
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3answers
5k views

Could a real-life X-Wing fly in Earth's atmosphere?

From an aerodynamic point of view, could a full-size aircraft of X-Wing design fly in Earth's atmosphere? Assuming you were free to add control surfaces here and there, could the wings in open ...
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2answers
1k views

Whats the anti-torque mechanism in horizontal take-off aircraft?

In most helicopters there is the anti-torque tail rotor to prevent the body from spinning in the opposite direction to the main rotor. What's the equivalent mechanism in horizontal takeoff single ...
2
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4answers
782 views

How does an aeroplane maintain balance during maneuvers?

I understand the principle behind flight, how the lift is generated etc. What I don't understand is when there are maneuvers made where the plane flies such that the wings are in vertical plane, how ...
4
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1answer
384 views

Can a hovering helicopter travel half the globe in 12 hours? [duplicate]

Suppose we have a helicopter that is able to stay stationary in flight for extended periods of time. If such a helicopter stayed at point A in the sky for 12 hours straight, would it reach the other ...
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2answers
213 views

What mechanisms exist for generating lift on a static object?

What mechanisms exist for generating lift on a static object? Condition is: Other than propellers I know that generating lift on a static object in a sense of anti-gravity for e.g. drone is not ...
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1answer
435 views

Propeller modelling

I need a (very) approximate model of a propeller on an aircraft. My principal question is this: what would the relationship be between: Propeller rate of rotation Aircraft speed Force generated by ...
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3answers
6k views

What causes an aircraft to roll when rudder is applied

When continuous rudder is applied in a typical light aircraft during straight and level flight at "normal" flying speeds and altitudes, the primary effect is that the aircraft will yaw to the left - ...
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0answers
157 views

Turboshaft Turbine Mathematical Model

Are there any simplified mathematical models for how two gas coupled turbines (also called a free power turbine) should interact with one another as the speed of the driving turbine changes. (i.e.) ...
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0answers
174 views

Control cable failure and critical flutter speed margin?

I'm a private pilot, and I have some questions to those who have knowledge of the aeroelastic effects and flutter phenomenon. I would like to talk a little about aerodynamic flutter onset speed and ...
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1answer
195 views

How target locking woks? [closed]

In many aerial war face movies they show that aircraft is locked by missile ,particularly in movie behind enemy line " F/A-18 Hornet" is locked by 2 SAM missile,pliot try to break the lock but ...
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1answer
1k views

Turning an airplane - coordinated turn and inclinometer (“the ball”)

I'm flying, turning in a stable orbit, i.e. at constant level with a constant angle of bank, at constant airspeed, with a constant radius of turn, as in the picture here (sorry it's my first post, ...
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1answer
121 views

What makes thrust reversers different from fans on a sailboat?

Why do thrust reversers on jet planes work? By Newton's third law, it seems like the force exerted by pushing air through the nozzle should cancel the force from redirecting the air forwards. The ...
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3answers
370 views

atmospheric phenomenon? What causes condensation trails to converge?

This air plane just caught my eye. Two contrails apparently are flowing backward, slightly off-centered and then ultimately converge, giving the overall shape of a very narrow rhomboid parallelogram, ...
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3answers
275 views

How to compute the speed necessary for an airplane to fly?

I give some physics lessons to a friend. She asked me a question that I am unable to answer. Could you help me ? A plane has a weight of $2\times10^6$kg. The surface of the wing is $1200 \text{m}^2$. ...
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1answer
352 views

Why ballasted gliders fly faster

The fact: Gliders have ballast tanks that can be filled with water. The addition of ballast increases weight, and this allows the glider to fly at faster airspeeds while maintaining the same glide ...
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2answers
751 views

Does “Air caterpillar” exist or even possible?

Air-Elf Aircraft Concept Is Able to Take-off or Land Vertically Air-Elf aircraft concept is to solve road congestion. The core of the concept is a new type of wing, “Air Caterpillar”. It can be ...
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5answers
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Turning an Airplane. What actually causes the circular motion in a banked (roll) turn?

Basically I'm wondering if this is correct. Which essentially says that you need a torque to get the nose of the craft to turn and that this is provided by the rear tail surfaces. After trying to ...
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2answers
618 views

Given a radius and velocity calculate position of an aircraft banking to make a turn in three dimensional space

Suppose an aircraft is moving at a certain fixed altitude above the ground. It follows a path defined by latitude and longitude. Now if we want to define the position of an aircraft at any point in ...
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2answers
488 views

Forces on an airfoil

I'm building an airplane (Super Baby Great Lakes) and I'm wondering something about airfoils. In particular (this plane is fabric covered), I'm wondering about the lifting forces on the main wings. ...
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2answers
809 views

Why does the higher pressure of air underneath an aeroplane wing keep it flying?

With aeroplane flight, the wings are shaped so that the air that goes over the top of the wing has to travel faster than the air that goes below the wing. This means that the air below the wing has ...
2
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2answers
154 views

How fast can toy helicopters change the turning direction of their propellers?

I saw someone do some tricks with a toy helicopter where he would turn it upside down for a while and it would still stay in the air. I thought it should have crash or at least not fly for very long ...
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3answers
467 views

In-flight damage to a supersonic jet

I'm doing some research for a book I'm writing, and, as the title implies, I'm looking to understand what happens when a supersonic jet sustains in-flight damage. Specifically, what happens to the ...
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2answers
1k views

What happens when a supersonic airplane flies through a cloud?

What happens when a supersonic airplane flies through a cloud? Will it punch a hole or is it more like a bullet through water (= hole closes immediately after the aircraft has passed)? Is there some ...
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1answer
268 views

Why does aircraft tail not project down from the fuselage? [closed]

Just what the title states; I was browsing photographs and it struck me how aircraft tails typically 'stand' atop the fuselage. A few aircraft (think it dates to the 40s-50s) have a tail that projects ...
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4answers
3k views

Why do aircraft inner wings lose lift when turning?

first question here, so please be gentle! I'm reading an entry-level engineering course book and am currently up to discussion of aircraft design. There's one particular statement that is unclear to ...
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0answers
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Practical personal aircraft today? [closed]

Is it possible to build, today, a personal aircraft that not use an impracticable amount of fuel for everyday use? What are the physical concepts that could be used to build it?
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1answer
710 views

How does a V formation save fuel for the lead plane?

I'm watching an episode of Mythbusters where they show aircraft saving 3-5% fuel when flying in a tight V formation. Interestingly, this also applies for the lead airplane. How is that possible for ...
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3answers
1k views

Does my model aircraft propeller beat the sound barrier?

I fly model aircraft. Recently I changed from a "1300kv" motor to a "1500kv" motor. The difference is in speed; the 1300kv can go about 16,400rpm full-throttle and with a fully charged battery and the ...
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2answers
2k views

Paper airplane physics

I am working on a game involving flying and steering a paper airplane for WP7. I want the plane to fly just like how normal paper airplanes fly (see this game for an example ...
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1answer
773 views

What does cross-track wind mean?

In aircraft literature, what does cross-track and along-track wind directions mean? Please explain in terms of the aircraft's motion relative to the wind direction. I can hazard a guess: along-track ...
7
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4answers
698 views

Why does an airplane have more lift near the ground?

I've noticed that an airplane appears to have more lift when it's almost touching the ground then it has 100 feet or more in the air. What causes this to occur?
5
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1answer
2k views

time difference with airplane travel direction

a fight from east to west, (e.g. Australia melbourne to perth) takes longer than travel backwards. (west to east). What's the reason?
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1answer
285 views

How much friction is caused by a 10x10 cm window on the side of an airplane?

Say that the airplane is going in 1000 km/h. On the side of the airplane, there is a 10x10 cm window. How much friction would this window cause. For the sake of the calculation, imagine that the ...