A subset of [tag:fluid-dynamics] concerning primarily forces such as lift and drag generated on bodies as they move through gasses or as gasses move through the body (typically air).

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Finding an equation relating the mass of a blade of a wind turbine to its velocity

I'm writing up my physics coursework and I thought I'd try and find an equation described in the title. This is my attempt: Is it correct?
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5answers
917 views

Is flying really easier on smaller scales?

In the book Playing with Planets, the author makes the following argument, pertinent to flying robots of the future: As it is, an important law of physics says that smaller organisms fly much more ...
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1answer
5k views

Did Felix Baumgartner produce a sonic boom during his jump?

I really got to thinking about this. The speed of sound is measured at 761.2 MPH at sea level. But how does this number change as air density decreases? The lack of air density is what allowed his ...
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2answers
234 views

Supermarket refrigerator - why is it noticebable colder in this shop area?

As we know fridge can't cool room in which it is (according to Second Law of Thermodynamics, heat emitted by fridge is greater than heat absorped). However, when we go next to the fridge in ...
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0answers
453 views

propeller flying physics for the layman

I'm starting a (quad?)copter build, and i can find plenty of knowledge about stabilizing the craft and things related to gyroscopy. but there's absolutely zero information on things that help me ...
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4answers
435 views

Bicycle Wheel Drag in Slipstream

I was recently driving behind a car that had a bicycle mounted on a carrier over the rear bumper. The bicycle wheels were not bound so they were rotating in the slip-stream of the car. I wonder, the ...
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1answer
320 views

Parachute jumping (high altitude)

I heard about parachute jumping at an initial altitude of 30km. I want to simulate this flight numerically. How could I simulate the air drag (I mean, Which equation gives the air drag)? Normally I ...
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2answers
872 views

What would be an appropiate shape for a parachute?

I'm trying to design a parachute that minimizes the descent velocity, but I'm not sure what shape I should use. From what I've read, ellipse-shaped parachutes are too aerodynamic and minimize drag, ...
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0answers
295 views

What happens to a delta-wing plane when it's nose is tilted away from the line of motion 30 to 45 degrees horizontally?

Consider a delta-wing plane whose wing spread angle is 61 degrees (the plane looks like a flying equilateral triangle). What would happen if a cross-wind hits it, so that the direction of motion ...
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2answers
271 views

Inefficiency Comparison of Car Air Conditioning vs. Open Windows

On a recent long, hot journey in Spain, I was pondering which was the most efficient way of cooling the car. Which of these would be the most effective? Switching on the air conditioning, thereby ...
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3answers
702 views

Why is an Aircraft Runway NOT like a Teaspoon?

If the aircraft runway were like a teaspoon (by this I mean, flat in the beginning, then curving downwards and finally upwards), would it not work in favor of the propulsion of the aircraft? In spite ...
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2answers
9k views

Calculate quadrotor propeller torque due to aerodynamic drag

I'd like to know the right formula to calculate torque of a quadrotor propeller (propeller pitch is constant) due to aerodynamic drag in terms of angular velocity $ \omega $. For the sake of my ...
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1answer
1k views

Paper plane between two fans - is this possible?

The setup: two fans facing each other, distance around 1m. Both are turned on. In between them, place a simple paper plane and according to this video, it will fly. ...
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4answers
388 views

What do spacecraft have in common with atmospheric aeroplanes?

Science fiction depicts spacecraft as both deep-space & surface capable. Is this feasible? I would have imagined a vessel constructed for space travel to have little in common with operating ...
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2answers
397 views

Why ballasted gliders fly faster

The fact: Gliders have ballast tanks that can be filled with water. The addition of ballast increases weight, and this allows the glider to fly at faster airspeeds while maintaining the same glide ...
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3answers
1k views

Why airplanes fly: the final truth

The questions about the reasons the aircraft fly are frequent among scientist, since the high school until now, even if I work on the other side of fluid mysterious world (the Low Reynolds numbers ...
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2answers
220 views

Why does reentry from space tend to result in such great heat?

Let's pretend for a moment that the atmosphere had sea-level density, pressure, and temperature all the way up to, say 500km high, and then would abruptly end in a complete vaccum. In such a ...
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1answer
3k views

Difference between propeller and fan in pulling force

In the context of producing a pulling force perpendicular to the 'spinning plane' of a propeller/fan, is it correct to say that a propeller mainly achieves it's force by being aerofoils producing ...
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2answers
3k views

What is the optimal design for a paper airplane? (Or, at least, how can you approach it?)

Having only really known two designs for paper airplanes since my days as a child, one which flies about eight feet and another which flies about ten feet, I have always wondered how people manage to ...
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3answers
2k views

Does wind speed things up or accelerate things?

This question may seem odd, but I can't think of anything better. So I'll go straight to the point. Let's say there's a projectile in air going east, shot at a certain angle, with a certain speed. ...
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6answers
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Turning an Airplane. What actually causes the circular motion in a banked (roll) turn?

Basically I'm wondering if this is correct. Which essentially says that you need a torque to get the nose of the craft to turn and that this is provided by the rear tail surfaces. After trying to ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is exhaling more forceful than inhaling?

By blowing at pencil, a piece of paper, or another object up to fifty centimeters away, I can cause it to move away from me significantly. But I can't move an object toward myself by inhaling sharply ...
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0answers
415 views

Why don't Turbojet engines use the De Laval Nozzle? [closed]

Why don't Turbojet engines use the De Laval Nozzle? In fact, it seems that in a typical turbojet, the output nozzle contracts, not expands. As the temperature of exhaust gases is high -- it should ...
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2answers
523 views

Forces on an airfoil

I'm building an airplane (Super Baby Great Lakes) and I'm wondering something about airfoils. In particular (this plane is fabric covered), I'm wondering about the lifting forces on the main wings. ...
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2answers
972 views

Why does the higher pressure of air underneath an aeroplane wing keep it flying?

With aeroplane flight, the wings are shaped so that the air that goes over the top of the wing has to travel faster than the air that goes below the wing. This means that the air below the wing has ...
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2answers
1k views

What do bullet trails really look like?

In the movie The Matrix, during "bullet time" sequences, bullets are shown trailing evenly-spaced refracting blobs: ...
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1answer
580 views

Why does your car lurch toward an oncoming truck as it passes you?

I notice that the larger the truck the greater the magnitude of the lurch. Can anyone give a physical explanation to this?
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2answers
451 views

Laws of aerodynamics after breaking the sound barrier

my knowledge of physics is not very extensive, so I hope my question isn't too stupid. I know that when (for instance) a plane breaks trough the sound barrier, the laws of the aerodynamics change. ...
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1answer
2k views

Calculation for force generated by a rotating rectangular blade

When trying to calculate the lift force generated by a simple rectangular blade, I've found the following equation: $$F = \omega^2 L^2 l\rho\sin^2\phi$$ in which $\omega$ is the angular velocity, $L$ ...
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1answer
757 views

Local Mach number for an airfoil

I would like to know how to calculate the local Mach number on the upper surface of an airfoil given the ambient temperature, the local velocity on the airfoil surface, the freestream velocity, and ...
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0answers
112 views

Turbulence forming between the coaches of rail

is there any specific reason why rail coaches are connected by a rubber sheet; not of any other material ? I watched a documentary on trains (Discovery Channel) which said it connecting coaches by ...
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1answer
635 views

Ping pong ball levitation control system question, modeling as a damper? [closed]

I am building a control system to levitate a ping pong ball at a given height in a clear plastic tube using an arduino and implementing PID control. I have to come up with a transfer function... I am ...
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2answers
156 views

How fast can toy helicopters change the turning direction of their propellers?

I saw someone do some tricks with a toy helicopter where he would turn it upside down for a while and it would still stay in the air. I thought it should have crash or at least not fly for very long ...
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3answers
503 views

In-flight damage to a supersonic jet

I'm doing some research for a book I'm writing, and, as the title implies, I'm looking to understand what happens when a supersonic jet sustains in-flight damage. Specifically, what happens to the ...
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2answers
1k views

What happens when a supersonic airplane flies through a cloud?

What happens when a supersonic airplane flies through a cloud? Will it punch a hole or is it more like a bullet through water (= hole closes immediately after the aircraft has passed)? Is there some ...
4
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3answers
5k views

Could a real-life X-Wing fly in Earth's atmosphere?

From an aerodynamic point of view, could a full-size aircraft of X-Wing design fly in Earth's atmosphere? Assuming you were free to add control surfaces here and there, could the wings in open ...
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1answer
280 views

Why does aircraft tail not project down from the fuselage? [closed]

Just what the title states; I was browsing photographs and it struck me how aircraft tails typically 'stand' atop the fuselage. A few aircraft (think it dates to the 40s-50s) have a tail that projects ...
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0answers
98 views

Practical personal aircraft today? [closed]

Is it possible to build, today, a personal aircraft that not use an impracticable amount of fuel for everyday use? What are the physical concepts that could be used to build it?
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4answers
3k views

Why do aircraft inner wings lose lift when turning?

first question here, so please be gentle! I'm reading an entry-level engineering course book and am currently up to discussion of aircraft design. There's one particular statement that is unclear to ...
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2answers
3k views

Why does an airliner burn more fuel at lower altitudes?

At lower altitude an aeroplane usually has more lift. However an aeroplane flying at low altitudes (with gear/flaps up) at low velocity burns the same amount of fuel it would flying much faster at a ...
3
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8answers
1k views

How would you improve braking capability on a hovercraft? [closed]

Pretty much letting my mind free-wheel. Assume a fleet of air-supported hover-craft were to replace cars/etc on the streets. Assume also that the present traffic-signals/pedestrian rules remain ...
4
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2answers
149 views

The visibility of air

For pilots of gliders or sailplanes, the 'thermal' is the most important phenomena of the air. A thermal is classically described as an upward flow of air caused by ground level heating of air that ...
3
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1answer
466 views

Tear drop shape

i heard that a tear drop shap is the most aerodynamic shape possible or the best is this true? If this isn't true what is since i need to make a fast ROV? Also since i need to have a propeller to ...
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2answers
13k views

How can airplanes fly upside down?

I've read many times, including here on this very site that the commonly known explanation of flight is wrong, and that airplanes can fly because the shape of their wings deflects air down. This makes ...
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2answers
407 views

Air drag coefficient value

Is there any equation that calculates the $C_d$ value in the formula of air drag ? $$F_d = \rho C_d v^2 A$$ I have found that there are tables for this constant but I am looking for the equation that ...
3
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0answers
167 views

What kind of shape has the lowest flutter wind speed?

What kind of shape has the lowest flutter wind speed and is the most unstable? I mean for rigid body. Thanks Yes, I know many factors affect the flutter in a MSD system (for rigid body), however ...
5
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2answers
364 views

Aerodynamics of two objects closely following each other

On bicycles.se a question came up about whether one cyclist drafting another causes the lead cyclist to be slowed down. A contributor suggested that the opposite might be the case, that the leading ...
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8answers
29k views

Why does the air flow faster over the top of an airfoil?

I understand the common explanation of lift, which describes the airflow over the top of the wing as moving faster than the air below the wing. However, I don't quite understand why the air moves ...
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4answers
4k views

Why is 55-60 MPH optimal for gas mileage of a passenger car?

My driver's education teacher back in high school said 55 MPH is optimal for gas mileage of a passenger car. Just last week, I read an article in a magazine saying 60 MPH is optimal. These numbers are ...
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1answer
298 views

Is this simulation following real physics?

I am trying to simulate a game in Box2D(Physics engine). The game that I am trying to simulate is very simple and can be found here: http://www.makaimedia.com/#/speartoss What I want to know is that, ...