The action is the integral of the Lagrangian over time, or the integral of the Lagrangian Density over both time and space.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
2answers
81 views

Action and Action integral: Different kinds of variational principles

What are the difference between: the action $\int_{t_{1}}^{t_{2}}(L+H) dt$ that we use in the principle of least action, and the action integral $\int_{t_{1}}^{t_{2}}L dt$ that we use in ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Energy Tensor, covariant derivate, variation respect to the metric [duplicate]

I'm doing the variation of a Lagrangian respect to the metric, but I am having problem with a particular terminus. My action is: $$ S=\int d^4x \sqrt{-g}[ (\nabla_\mu A^\mu)^2]$$ My lagrangian is: ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Variation of a lagrangian, least action, metric, covariant derivate [closed]

I am doing the variation of a Lagrangian, but I am having problem with a particle terminus. My action is: $$S=\int d^4x \sqrt{-g}[ (\nabla_\mu A^\mu)^2] $$ I want to get the $T_{\mu\nu} $ ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Difference between Gravitational and Matter Scalar Fields

In the context of Scalar-Tensor theories of gravity (for example in Brans-Dicke) what is the difference between gravitational and matter scalar Fields? My doubt comes from "The scalar-tensor Theory ...
5
votes
5answers
173 views

Quantum entanglement and spooky action at a distance

When quantum entanglement is explained in "layman's terms", it seems (to me) that the first premise, that we have to accept on faith, is that a particle doesn't have a certain property (the particle ...
5
votes
2answers
109 views

Functional Derivative in the Linear Sigma Model

In the linear sigma model, the Lagrangian is given by $$ \mathcal{L} = \frac{1}{2}\sum_{i=1}^{N} \left(\partial_\mu\phi^i\right)\left(\partial^\mu\phi^i\right) ...
4
votes
0answers
36 views

CM: Need to recover the Hamiltonian, knowing conserved quantities and information about the EOM, possibly via action-angle coordinates

Statement of the problem: I have a system with 2 degrees of freedom and I have found two independent conserved quantities, without knowledge of the Hamiltonian. I'm looking for a method to recover a ...
2
votes
0answers
135 views

Question about an integration by parts in Feynman's Quantum Mechanics [closed]

I have begun reading Feynman & Hibbs Quantum Mechanics and Path Integrals. Knowing little about variational calculus or Lagrangians I found the following integration by parts opaque. I think if I ...
3
votes
0answers
45 views

Derivation of the Noether current

(c.f Di Francesco et al, Conformal Field Theory, pp40-41) I am trying to derive eqn (2.142) or $\delta S = \int d^d x \partial_{\mu}j^{\mu}_a \omega_a$ in the book CFT by Di Francesco et al. I have ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

The Einstein-Hilbert Action On-Shell

If one consider the Maxwell action as $$S=-\int \mathrm{d^{4}}x\! \ \frac{1}{4}F_{ab}F^{ab} \,$$ one find the usual Maxwell equation $$\partial_{a}F^{ab}=0$$ Then one can simply arrive the following ...
7
votes
3answers
229 views

Confusion regarding the principle of least action in Landau's “The Classical Theory of Fields”

Edit: The previous title didn't really ask the same thing as the question (sorry about that), so I've changed it. To clarify, I understand that the action isn't always a minimum. My questions are in ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Deriving field equation in Yang Mills theory

Trying to show that $$D_\mu\vec{F^{\mu \nu}} = \partial_{\mu}\vec{F^{\mu \nu}} + g \vec{A_\mu} \times \vec{F^{\mu \nu}} = 4 \pi \vec{J^\nu},$$ or (correct me if I'm wrong) $$ \partial_{\mu} F^{\mu ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

A Question on Hamilton's Principle

In some literatures, the Hamilton's principle for conservative systems is introduced by this equation: $$\delta \int_{t_1}^{t_2}(T-V) ~\mathrm{d}t~=~0$$ In some others, this principle is introduces ...
3
votes
2answers
100 views

Variation of Action with time coordinate variations

I was trying to derive equation (65) in the following review: http://relativity.livingreviews.org/open?pubNo=lrr-2004-4&page=articlesu23.html This slightly unusual then usual classical mechanics ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Source material desired for behavior of derivatives of action

I'm basically looking for concise commentary, and especially source material/ short discussion pertaining to the following, which I will (emphasizing loosely) state as follows: Suppose a given action ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Partial derivative of the classical action with respect to time [closed]

Does anyone know how to derive the general identity: $$\frac{\partial S}{\partial t}=-E$$ where $S$ is the classical action defined as $$S=\int_0^t\left[\frac{1}{2}m\dot x-V(x))\right]d\tau$$ and ...
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Deriving massless point particle action from Maxwell action?

Starting with the Maxwell action for a $U(1)$ vector gauge boson with a general metric and (I'm assuming) using a plane wave ansatz for the vector, is it possible to derive the action for a massless ...
4
votes
2answers
115 views

Stationary points of the action functional

In QFT the principle of stationary action states that we choose fields that will make the action stationary but what if the action has many stationary points? What's the significance of these other ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Functional field integral in condensed matter field theory (Altland)

This is the action for the 1+1 dimensional interacting electron system; $$S_{cl}[\theta , \phi]= \frac{1}{2\pi} \int dxd\tau \left(g^{-1}v(\partial_x \theta)^2 + gv(\partial_x \phi)^2 + ...
3
votes
3answers
165 views

Lagrangian for relativistic massless particle

For relativistic massive particle, the action is $$S ~=~ -m_0 \int ds ~=~ -m_0 \int d\lambda ~(\dot x ^\mu \dot x_\mu)^{\frac{1}{2}} ~=~ \int d\lambda \ L,$$ where $ds$ is the proper time of the ...
1
vote
0answers
86 views

Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields [duplicate]

Let $\mathscr L (\phi(\mathbf x), \partial \phi(\mathbf x))$ denote the Lagrangian density of field $\phi(\mathbf x)$. Then then actual value of the field $\phi(\mathbf x)$ can be computed from the ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

Field equations in extended EH-GHY action. Is Schwarzschild a solution?

When taking the EH action, $$S_{EH} = \frac{1}{16\pi G}\int_M d^4x \sqrt{-g}R$$ and making a small variation in the metric while ignoring boundary terms, we obtain $$\delta S_{EH} = \frac{1}{16\pi ...
3
votes
0answers
47 views

Action for $p-p'$ strings (equation 13.5.21 in Polchinski's textbook)

This action reads $$S=-\frac{1}{4g_{D9}^2}\int d^{10}x F_{MN} F^{MN}-\frac{1}{4g_{D5}^2}\int d^{6}x F'_{MN} F'^{MN}- \int d^6 x \left[ D_{\mu} \chi^{\dagger} D^{\mu} \chi + ...
6
votes
1answer
110 views

Intuition for actions written as integrals over spacetime

Right now I'm simply looking for an intuitive explaination of actions that integrate over a 4-volume element, $d^4x$ rather than a parameter say $\lambda$. More specifically I'm well versed in action ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Getting the Lagrangian from the action in curved spacetime

Suppose I have this action: $$ S = \int \mathrm d^4 x\sqrt{-g}\times \text{something}$$ where $g$ is the determinant of the metric. Should I take the Lagrangian to be: $$ \mathcal L = \sqrt{-g} ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Can I applicate the law of action and reaction on energy?

It is clear that if you push on some object, there is reaction of the same force. But is it the same energy? Thanks a lot.
1
vote
1answer
92 views

How do I obtain the Lagrangian in standard for using action? [closed]

I have action as shown below $$S=\int \mathrm{d}t \int \mathrm{d}x^3 \bar\psi\left(i\partial_t\psi +\frac1{2m}\bar\nabla^2\psi-V(x)\psi\right)$$ How do I manipulate it to obtain the Lagrangian ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Normal to the Hypersurfaces

I am trying to understand the derivation of the Hilbert-Einstein action. However it requires a knowledge about hyper-surfaces for the boundaries of the integrals and also about the normal to the ...
8
votes
4answers
273 views

Does the action and Lagrangian have identical symmetries and conserved quantities?

From the book Introduction to Classical Mechanics With Problems and Solutions by David Morin, page 236 states: Noether's Theorem: For each symmetry of the Lagrangian, there is a conserved ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

How Hamilton's Principle was found?

Hamilton's principle states that the actual path a particle follows from points $p_1$ and $p_2$ in the configuration space between times $t_1$ and $t_2$ is such that the integral $$S = ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

Does action really have to be Lorentz-invariant in SR?

From Landau & Lifshitz The Classical Theory Of Fields it is said: To determine the action integral for a free material particle (a particle not under the influence of any external force), we ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Differential Operators in Polyakov Action

What do the differential operators in the Polyakov action mean? How does one derive the Polyakov action and treat the differential operators?
0
votes
2answers
102 views

is action integral Lorentz invariant?

I need to find the Lagrangian for charged particles in EM fields considering relativistic effects. Is action integral Lorentz invariant. $$A = \int_{t_1}^{t_2} L (q_i, \dot q_i, t) dt $$ According ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Can't understand the principle of least action [closed]

I tried many hours to understand the principle of least action, and those hours become days... and I still didn't understand that principle/ and how it relates to Newtonian mechanics? Could someone ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Question about “different” equations of motion in dependence of indices

Let's have the action $$ S = \int (\partial_{\mu}h^{\mu \sigma}\partial^{\nu}h_{\nu \sigma} - \Lambda h^{\mu \nu}T_{\mu \nu}) d^{4}x. $$ For definiteness, $$ h_{\mu \nu} = h_{\nu \mu} , \quad T_{\mu ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

Curved spacetime point particle Lagrangian density

This is probably trivially related to the question: Action for a point particle in a curved spacetime , but am a bit unsure how to write it as a Lagrangian density. In curved spacetime the action is ...
5
votes
1answer
216 views

Derivation of Noether's theorem - A problem with physical significance

My question is about the field theoretic version of Noether's theorem. I am deeply troubled by one of the hypotheses of the theorem. As it is the standard textbook for Lagrange mechanics, I'll follow ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

Classical electrodynamics formulated in terms of forces

The Newton's law of universal gravitation is described in terms of a force, which is produced by an action at a distance. It also can be described using the concept of a field, and that would be an ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Why we can set variations for the metric and its derivatives to zero at infinity?

This question is the continuation of the following one. I still don't understand why $(1)$ may be set to zero. This refers to the zero value variations of metric and its derivatives on the infinitely ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Why can we assume independent variables when using Lagrange multipliers in nonholonomic systems?

I'm studying from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics. In section 2.4, he discusses nonholonomic systems. We assume that the constraints can be put in the form $f_\alpha(q, \dot{q}, t) =0$, $\alpha = 1 ...
3
votes
1answer
104 views

Hamilton-Jacobi formalism and on-shell actions

My question is essentially how to extract the canonical momentum out of an on-shell action. The Hamilton-Jacobi formalism tells us that Hamilton's principal function is the on-shell action, which ...
11
votes
3answers
419 views

Is Einstein-Hilbert action the unique action whose variation gives Einstein's field equations?

I know that scaling the action with a non-zero multiplicative constant, or adding a total divergence term to the Lagrangian density do not change the Euler-Lagrange equations, cf. e.g. this ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

How can a transversality condition be invoked to reduce the Euler-Lagrange equation?

I asked this question regarding the Euler-Lagrange equation at MSE and have gotten no response. I will ask it here too. I think I might have more luck here since the E-L equation is at the core of ...
3
votes
0answers
53 views

The relation between the action of tunneling and the energy

In the semi-classical physics, the probability of the penetration through a barrier is given by $$ p \sim \exp \left( - A_{0} (E) \right), $$ where $A_0$ is the imaginary part of the action and $E$ ...
0
votes
1answer
204 views

Detailing why a scalar gravity theory predicts no bending of light [closed]

I want to understand in technical detail why a particular scalar theory for gravity predicts no bending of light. It is left as a question, either in "Gravitation" by Misner, Thorne, and Wheeler, ...
5
votes
1answer
486 views

How to find the Stress-Energy tensor?

I am a bit at loss about how to proceed to find the stress-energy tensor given some distribution of matter. The Wikipedia page gives some examples, and some (inequivalent) definitions for it: Using ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Finding the EOM for a charged relativistic particle

For an exercise sheet of a course in general relativity I'm asked to derive the equations of motion for a charged particle in an EM-field given by a potential $A^\mu$. I am give the action: $$S = ...
6
votes
2answers
375 views

Derivation of the Polyakov Action

As is usually done when first presenting string theory, the Nambu-Goto Action, $$ S_{\text{NG}}:=-T\int d\tau d\sigma \sqrt{-g} $$ ($g:=\det (g_{\alpha \beta})$ is the induced metric on the ...
1
vote
1answer
147 views

Expansion of action in general relativity?

I am reading a lot about GR lately (because of thesis), and one thing bothers me, and I'm not finding a direct answer to it. For instance in one article, the author says that they are expanding ...
3
votes
1answer
284 views

Euler's equations of rigid body motion from least action principle

I would like to derive Euler's equations of rigid body motion from least action principle. Suppose we are in free space so we have no gravity so Lagrangian is equal to kinetic energy. $$ L = T = ...