Acoustics is the interdisciplinary science that deals with the study of all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids including vibration, sound, ultrasound and infrasound. Applications of acoustics are for instance the audio and noise control industries.

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Why do I always hear remote train horn at night?

This is definitely not an illusion, as many people have the same experience. I have usually lived in places miles away from train stations, which makes it unlikely to hear any train horns during the ...
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3answers
63 views

It seems that the harmonic (integer multiple) overtones of a sound usually all have the same phase. Is this true, and if so why?

And if you were to give each of them different phases, would the sound start to sound "off", or would it sound the same? All the same frequencies would be present, which makes me think it might sound ...
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13 views

Can one use the theory of directional speakers to demodulate ultrasounds through a body (bones, muscles)? [on hold]

Like sonic and ultrasonic weapons. But sound propagates through the ground and is demodulated by one's body. If someone does that how can I locate the ultrasonics source? I'd like to know how to ...
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0answers
14 views

How far is the range of an ultrasonic sensor as far as it can transmit? [duplicate]

How far can ultrasonic waves propagate in the air? (if the energy is enough), how far can ultrasonic waves propagate in the ground (concrete floor)? Are there any articles or experiments about ...
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0answers
12 views

When longitudinal waves and transversal waves enter air from a soild, what will happen? How do waves transform?

When ultrasonic waves meet the interface (surface) between two media they will reflect and refract. What is the effect of the acoustic impedance on reflection? Is there any list about acoustical ...
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3answers
777 views

Physics of weird “boing” sound in racquetball courts?

While playing racquetball, I frequently hear a very prominent "boing" sound (or more formally, a chirp). For example, you can hear it in this video when the ball hits the front wall. Does anyone know ...
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2answers
103 views

Why does a microphone membrane only measure pressure and not particle velocity?

Microphones (e.g. condenser microphone) are assumed to have a voltage output proportional to the sound pressure at the diaphragm. If the operating principle is that the voltage output is proportional ...
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1answer
122 views

Sound Propagation using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) considering wind effects

I am trying to plot the propagation of sound from a fixed source in a 2D environment using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method taking into account the effects of the wind velocity. I came ...
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2answers
421 views

The shape of speaker cones

This is related to another question I just asked, but they are different enough I thought it deserved its own spot. Speaker elements seem to always be shaped like a cone with a portion of a sphere at ...
2
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1answer
68 views

What happens to the energy?

if we make a bell ring in a vacuum room for 5 mins. And then open the door, will be able to hear the sound? If no sounds vibrations are emitted to the environment what happens to the energy that ...
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5answers
147 views

What are those characteristics by which every sound can be identified uniquely?

I have very basic question regarding sound I tried to search it over google but couldn’t find the right answer, my question: ...
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2answers
91 views

Sound difference between musical instruments [duplicate]

I know that the difference between two musical notes is given by the sound frequency, and the difference in volume is given by the amplitude. What I am wondering is why does the same note sound ...
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1answer
20 views

Resonance of a tube of air in case of more complex shapes

I've been thinking about posting this question on Music Performance stack, but finally I think it fits more here since I'm interrested in technical details. The subject of resonance of a tube of air ...
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5answers
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Do low frequency sounds really carry longer distances?

It is a common belief that low frequencies travel longer distances. Indeed, the bass is really what you hear when the neighbor plays his HiFi loud (Woom Woom). Try asking people around, a lot of them ...
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1answer
40 views

Can the motion of a cracking whip be described as the interference of two waves?

I was watching a whip crack in slow motion and I noticed that the motion of the whip could be described using two different circular descriptions. 1) the user circles the whip around over his head, ...
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1answer
43 views

Dimensions of wave equation

If you take the homogenous wave equation: $$-\Delta_x u(x,t) + \frac{1}{c^2} \frac{\partial^2 u}{\partial^2 t} (x,t) \ = \ 0 \ \ \mathrm{in} \ \Omega \times (0, \infty),$$ with some proper initial- ...
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4answers
138 views

Is magnetic levitation a good way to vibrationally isolate a speaker from its support?

I recently heard about this company planning to sell a magnetically levitating bluetooth speaker. I understand that the levitation is partly motivated by visual aesthetics, but on the website the ...
2
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2answers
87 views

what could generate a high-pitched whine in electronics where the frequency depends on the current?

So I was operating a Laue machine recently which generates x-rays and fires them at a sample, and I noticed that there was a high-pitched whine coming from the instrument (nothing abnormal, just ...
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3answers
63 views

Is sound relative when travelling fast?

If I was listening to music through my headphones and travelling close to the speed of light and time is slowing down around me , would the music slow down as well?
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1answer
362 views

Why is there a hiss sound when water falls on a hot surface?

Why is there a hiss sound when water falls on a hot surface? I have searched a lot, asked my teachers but none of them seem to give me the logical answer to it.
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1answer
18 views

How to compute $L_{\rm eq}$ from temporal pressure data

I have pressure vs time data. how can I compute sound equivalence Level $L_{\rm eq}$ in decibels? can this be done from a frequency spectrum assuming that it is constant?
2
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1answer
30 views

Energy estimation of an acoustic wave

I have an issue with 2D acoustic wave field modelling. In order to estimate the energy propagation direction of an acoustic wave I use Poynting vectors $S$ which can be described by $$ \vec{S} = - ...
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1answer
25 views

Compute impulse response of a cavity for sound waves

Given a (closed or not) surface and a point emitting a spherical sound wave, how can I calculate the wave amplitude in any point of space, considering reflections on this surface ? The idea is to ...
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1answer
47 views

Longitudinal waves in a large (infinite) solid block

Specifically, I am trying to roughly determine the sound produced by a ball when it hits the floor and bounces. If the ball exerts a pressure onto the floor, then certainly this pressure will go on to ...
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1answer
49 views

What are the similarities and differences between speech and music sounds?

From an acoustic perspective, I guess speech sounds are produced by varying/manipulating: resonance (shaping the cavity; something to do with harmony?) f0 (the length of the string/pipe/whatever) ...
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2answers
38 views

How does ultrasonic horn produce a convection current in the water?

When I was using ultrasonic horn in a beaker, I notice that there are convection currents in the beaker and stir up my substance. I don't understand why it produce water current, I thought that it ...
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2answers
58 views

Standing sound wave in a wind instrument

So I've had this question bugging me ever since I saw sound at physics class: How is it possible to match the resonance frequency of a column of air in an organ pipe and form a standing sound wave by ...
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4answers
970 views

Doppler effect of sound waves

I am looking for interesting ways to introduce the Doppler effect to students. I want some situations in nature or every day life, where a student is possibly surprised and may ask "how could it be"? ...
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2answers
102 views

Is work done by sound wave on air particles?

Is it possible for sound wave to do net work on air particles? As in can a sound wave make the air move in one direction so that it can for example move a sail boat ? I think since molecules gyrate ...
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1answer
51 views

The inverse square law of sound through solids?

We all know about the inverse square law of sound. In short the power of the wave will get evenly spread on an ever increasing spherical expansion and this will dissipate the power of the wave at a ...
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0answers
15 views

Dispersing ultrasound in a tube - patters

I am looking for patterns to efficiently disperse reflected ultrasound in the range of wavelengths 1mm to 4mm within the interior of a narrow tube (I do not want wall reflections). For various reasons ...
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1answer
108 views

Does a square wave “smooth out” in the air?

I understand that playing a square wave from speakers cannot produce a PERFECTLY sharp division between compression and rarefaction. But it's sharp enough to sound distinctly different from a sine ...
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0answers
39 views

Designing a home theater room for optimal acoustics

We are building an addition on our home that will allow us to build a basement home theater room with some level of flexibility regarding its size and shape. I've been reading somewhat conflicting ...
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0answers
18 views

Could symmetric molecular stretching cause a physical object to become amorphous? [closed]

I understand very little of this, but my google-foo has yielded me next to nothing, I thought I might then just ask. My real question here is if it might be possible through the use of vibration to ...
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1answer
60 views

Need help with this derivation (Sound intensity)

I will copy a little bit of what my textbook says. By the way, we're talking about sound here. $$Intensity = (0.5)BwkA^2$$ The textbook claims that by using the relationships $w=vk$ and ...
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2answers
95 views

Picking up audio using high speed video?

In the movie Eagle Eye, ARIIA (an intelligence-gathering supercomputer/AI) picks up audio using video recording of the vibrations in a coffee cup. How close is this to reality? I have see it done ...
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1answer
33 views

What frequency of sound waves produces the most vibration [closed]

The name of the question is rather contradictory and counter-intuitive since sound is produced by vibration. However, very low frequencies around 32Hz and receding are bass. From what I have read ...
6
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1answer
63 views

How quickly should a fluid come to hydrostatic equilibrium?

Let's say I'm holding a one-liter water bottle, full of water, which I then drop. Before dropping the water bottle, the equilibrium is for there to be a pressure gradient in the water canceling the ...
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2answers
70 views

Do we hear sounds differently on the highest mountains?

Some searching gives that above 6,000 meter altitude the air density is less than half of that at sea level. Speed of sound is about 15-20% slower and "acoustic impedance" seems to change too. Do ...
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2answers
484 views

Riddle about speed

This stems from a riddle I read in a magazine perhaps 20 years ago so I apologise for the imprecise recollection. A dog that can run infinitely fast is placed on an infinitely large flat surface and ...
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2answers
236 views

Speed of sound in gaseous medium

Why does the speed of sound decrease as the density of the medium increases? I know why this happens mathematically, but I want to know what happens at the molecular level that results in higher speed ...
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2answers
2k views

How can sound waves propagate through air?

We know that the sound waves propagate through air, and it can't travel through vacuum. so the thing that help it doing that is the air's molecules pressure. So my question how can that happens? I ...
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1answer
66 views

Questions related to resonance/standing-waves and sound

I understand resonance for a simple harmonic oscillator but not for more complex systems like standing waves. How can I be in resonance with the normal mode in an organ pipe? I understand that the ...
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1answer
43 views

Woodwind instruments overtones [duplicate]

When playing woodwind instruments, e.g., flute, if one blows harder, the sound will be one octave higher. Even harder gives even higher overtones. Does anyone know why?
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1answer
806 views

Sound velocity in water

Conductivity, temperature, depth sensors are used by oceanography to calculate the velocity of sound at varying depths. These measurment values are used to comprise sound velocity profiles like the ...
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1answer
56 views

From where does the sound come from when two charged objects meet in real life?

I am sure all of us have played with rubbing things and producing static electricity and when I was charging my comb by rubbing it on my hair and watching it attracting a small piece of paper, I heard ...
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3answers
81 views

How far can one hear sound?

I was thinking how far can I hear sound coming from a concert. Today I was walking at night and I could hear sound from somewhere very far. I started following the sound but sound used to disappear ...
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1answer
886 views

Why does a wobbly metal sheet make the sound of thunder?

In other words, what is the similarity between a lightning bolt and a wobbling sheet that make them sound alike? It seems to me that the two systems have a much different way of moving the air, and ...
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3answers
597 views

Calculate loudness of sound: why am I getting contradictory answers?

I know of events that are happening about 45 KM away from me which are said to be 210 or 213 dB at 75 meters distance from multiple sources. I think that I can hear them, so I did the obvious: $$ ...
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4answers
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Why do bubbles make a sound?

I have an understanding of how bubbles work. They encapsulate air (or other fluids) in a membrane caused by surface tension. When they pop, there is often a sound. Sound is a type of energy, kinetic ...