Acoustics is the interdisciplinary science that deals with the study of all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids including vibration, sound, ultrasound and infrasound. Applications of acoustics are for instance the audio and noise control industries.

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Physics of “boing” sound in raquetball courts?

While playing raquetball, I frequently hear a very prominent "boing" sound (or more formally, a chirp). For example, you can hear it in this video when the ball hits the front wall. Does anyone know ...
6
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3answers
345 views

Why do bubbles make a sound?

I have an understanding of how bubbles work. They encapsulate air (or other fluids) in a membrane caused by surface tension. When they pop, there is often a sound. Sound is a type of energy, kinetic ...
0
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1answer
14 views

How to compute $L_{\rm eq}$ from temporal pressure data

I have pressure vs time data. how can I compute sound equivalence Level $L_{\rm eq}$ in decibels? can this be done from a frequency spectrum assuming that it is constant?
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1answer
42 views

Resonant Frequency & Opera Singers [on hold]

Would it be possible under math of strings to note the frequency of each string vibrations? And in doing so, in hand with using the technique opera singers use to shatter glass with their voice, would ...
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0answers
29 views

SInce heat is a vibration in solids, isn't it just small scale sound? [duplicate]

On an atomic scale I think of electrons hitting positive ions in an electric lattice. Most energy there is heat energy. If I think of ball bearings flying through a large lattice, I think sound is ...
4
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1answer
331 views

Why is there a hiss sound when water falls on a hot surface?

Why is there a hiss sound when water falls on a hot surface? I have searched a lot, asked my teachers but none of them seem to give me the logical answer to it.
0
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1answer
18 views

Compute impulse response of a cavity for sound waves

Given a (closed or not) surface and a point emitting a spherical sound wave, how can I calculate the wave amplitude in any point of space, considering reflections on this surface ? The idea is to ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Standing sound wave in a wind instrument

So I've had this question bugging me ever since I saw sound at physics class: How is it possible to match the resonance frequency of a column of air in an organ pipe and form a standing sound wave by ...
183
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4answers
31k views

Can I compute the mass of a coin based on the sound of its fall?

Other day, I bumped my bookshelf and a coin fell down. This gave me an idea. Is it possible to compute the mass of a coin, based on the sound emitted when it falls? I think that there should be a ...
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0answers
24 views

How far can a voice carry through the desert at night? [closed]

Let's use these conditions: temp = 7C, relative humidity = 10%, air pressure = 85 kPa, elevation = 1500m, shouting at 100dB (not sure if this is a reasonable volume). Given these conditions, what ...
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2answers
84 views

what could generate a high-pitched whine in electronics where the frequency depends on the current?

So I was operating a Laue machine recently which generates x-rays and fires them at a sample, and I noticed that there was a high-pitched whine coming from the instrument (nothing abnormal, just ...
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4answers
6k views

Why do bass tones travel through walls?

I was in the shower while my roommate was listening to music and got to thinking about the fact that I could only hear the bass and lower drums through the walls. Why is this? The two possibilities I ...
2
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2answers
132 views

Can we measure temperature of a object just by the sound it makes?

I been thinking if temperature is a basic property of macroscopic objects rather than of quantum or microscopic objects and it is as a result of average kinetic energy of particles residing in the ...
5
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1answer
57 views

Why does a wall act as a low-pass filter?

Learning about the fourier transform and its connection to filtering/convolution got me curious about naturally occurring filters. Why/how is it that brick walls naturally act as a low-pass filter ...
5
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2answers
754 views

Negative sound rooms

Well it is pretty well known that rooms with sound less than zero decibels, $\approx$ -15 decibels. How is it possible to create a room which is quieter than soundless? And it is claimed that just ...
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2answers
4k views

Frequency of the sound when blowing in a bottle

I'm sure you have tried sometime to make a sound by blowing in an empty bottle. Of course, the tone/frequency of the sound modifies if the bottle changes its shape, volume, etc. I am interested in ...
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0answers
60 views

How do we define a sound source?

How do we define a source of sound? Purely mathematically a sound source is a term $q$ \begin{equation} \frac{1}{c_0^2}\frac{\partial^2p'}{\partial t^2}- \nabla^2p' = q \end{equation} such that we ...
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1answer
49 views

Compression vs Rarefaction in Sound Waves

I am currently looking into solutions for Sound Classification, and I came across Ludvigsen's methodology (if anyone wishes to refer to it). The problem is that a sample graph of amplitudes in one of ...
0
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0answers
20 views

A sonar continuously emits x(t), a general but known waveform and is reflected by a target. hypothetical question

A sonar continuously emits x(t), a general but known waveform that is reflected by a target and received by the sonar. Both the sonar and the target move in the 3-dimensional space in a general but ...
6
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1answer
60 views

How quickly should a fluid come to hydrostatic equilibrium?

Let's say I'm holding a one-liter water bottle, full of water, which I then drop. Before dropping the water bottle, the equilibrium is for there to be a pressure gradient in the water canceling the ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Need help with this derivation (Sound intensity)

I will copy a little bit of what my textbook says. By the way, we're talking about sound here. $$Intensity = (0.5)BwkA^2$$ The textbook claims that by using the relationships $w=vk$ and ...
4
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2answers
60 views

How much does the sound definition vary during an LP (Vinyl)?

This question came to me when I realized how the linear speed varies while listening to a Vinyl LP. The linear speed variation has to be compensated with a variation in the resolution of the grooves, ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Questions related to resonance/standing-waves and sound

I understand resonance for a simple harmonic oscillator but not for more complex systems like standing waves. How can I be in resonance with the normal mode in an organ pipe? I understand that the ...
5
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1answer
115 views

Is the mathematical form of the acoustic diffusion equation present in other fields of physics?

We are working in the field of High Performance Computing and we have developed a very efficient parallel implementation for solving the Acoustic Diffusion Equation as described below: $$ ...
41
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1answer
1k views

Why does our voice sound different on inhaling helium?

This question (and answer) is an attempt to clear the air on what appears to be a very simple issue, with conflicting or unclear explanations on the internet. Arguments, negations, etc are invited. ...
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2answers
33 views

How does ultrasonic horn produce a convection current in the water?

When I was using ultrasonic horn in a beaker, I notice that there are convection currents in the beaker and stir up my substance. I don't understand why it produce water current, I thought that it ...
0
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1answer
41 views

(air pressure and displacement) Isn't this image wrong?

Isn't this figure wrong? P(x,t) = -B(dy/dx) . If the derivative of air displacement has a maximum, then this is where the pressure is minimum, not maximum as this figure suggests. Could someone ...
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1answer
32 views

Using Audacity to generate power spectral density

Say I record something with a sound recording program like Audacity (e.g. plucking a guitar string). How could I use that recording to plot a dB vs Frequency graph?
6
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3answers
711 views

Is a sonic boom a one-time bang or a continuous noise?

Is a sonic boom a one-time bang, caused when an object initially goes supersonic, or is it a continuous noise emitted by the object as it's travelling? To be more specific, will an aircraft which is ...
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7answers
507 views

Is it possible for a sound to be louder as you move away from it?

I was asked a puzzling question/thought experiment: Given the source of a sound in a wide open field so acoustics do not play a role, is it possible for a sound to be louder as you move away from it. ...
29
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3answers
2k views

What is the minimum pressure of a medium for which a sound wave can exist?

At what pressure will be particles in a medium be unable to form a sound wave when disturbed? How can this pressure be described mathematically? My guess is that this would correspond to the point at ...
5
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1answer
115 views

Sound Propagation using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) considering wind effects

I am trying to plot the propagation of sound from a fixed source in a 2D environment using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Method taking into account the effects of the wind velocity. I came ...
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1answer
42 views

Why does lightning cause sound?

If I understand correctly, lightning is the discharge of electricity from the atmosphere into the planet. However, if I switch on a lamp, the wires are not causing thunder (or any audible sound). ...
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1answer
53 views

How to calculate frequency in the following question [closed]

A police car with a siren of frequency $8$ kHz is moving with uniform velocity $36 \mathrm{km}\, \mathrm{hr}^{-1}$ towards a tall building which reflects the sound waves. The speed of sound in air is ...
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1answer
3k views

Science behind the singing wine glass

A wine glass filled with water (approximately half or a quarter), when you use a wet finger and rub the top of the wine glass, the wine glass will produce a sound. I heard that it is because of the ...
0
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2answers
80 views

can silence happens when 2 sound waves destroy each other [duplicate]

Hi is there any possibility that you located between 2 sound sources and u hear nothing? as we know 2 wave in opposite direction will destroy each other...
1
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1answer
46 views

Does sound gets faster when air bubble is supend in water?

Does sound gets faster when air bubble is suspend in water? c = sqrt(K/P) c = speed K = bulk module P = density When air bubbles is homogenized into water the density is lower, so should sound ...
4
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2answers
336 views

What is the duration of a snap?

What is the duration of a snap (of the fingers)? When someone says, "it's ridiculously fast, it's like [snap]" - where [snap] is them snapping their fingers - they would normally mean it is ...
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2answers
95 views

A strange audio phenomenon, could there be a physical interpretation to it?

http://mathoverflow.net/q/165038/14414 Motivation : Here is a motivation as to why this problem is so important. Let $f(t)$ be an audio signal. We can safely asume it to be bandlimited to 0-20kHz as ...
0
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0answers
19 views

How much can a bass guitar shake the ground?

I'm writing an English essay about the bass guitar, and I'm sure we all know that the low range of the instrument can shake the ground. But just how much seismic activity can a bass cause? I know ...
24
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6answers
3k views

Fourier transformation in nature/natural physics?

I just came from a class on Fourier Transformations as applied to signal processing and sound. It all seems pretty abstract to me, so I was wondering if there were any physical systems that would ...
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1answer
47 views

Do eigenvalues in a cylindrical symmetric problem tell us anything about the Fourier spectrum?

During a lecture we were solving the Helmholtz equation for particular boundary conditions, corresponding to different shapes of an oscillating drum, as in the famous Mark Kac's problem ...
39
votes
7answers
4k views

Why don't two musical instruments sometimes generate destructive interference?

I'm an electrical engineer, and I understand wave propagation, interference patterns, and so on. But I'm missing something basic, so perhaps my understanding isn't as good as I believe. I'll show my ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Standing sound waves phase difference

This is a basic question but I don't fully understand what is going on. When we have a pipe in resonance we get standing waves, where displacement antinodes are at pressure nodes and vise versa. So ...
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2answers
74 views

Cause for Power Transmission Tower “Breathing”

OK, this question is not your usual one: Last night while hiking solo from the mountains back to my car at the mountain/desert interface (Lone Pine, CA), I had a rather bizarre -- and downright spooky ...
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2answers
175 views

Does sound cancel itself out?

If there are two 10 x 2 x 1 foot rectangles in space and they are lined up so if they hit each other there will be no spots that are not hit in the front of the rectangle. Then they are pushed forward ...
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Sound travel problem

Here's an example of my question to make my explanation a bit easier. Say a decent loudspeaker plays a tune at loud volume 100m away from me and another speaker plays the same tune at lot lower ...
8
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3answers
328 views

Is there physics behind the layout of a piano keyboard?

We have 12 different 'notes' per octave on a musical keyboard. They are set up so that every 'note' (A, B,C etc) is a second harmonic of the same 'note' in the next higher octave. With this ratio in ...
3
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1answer
63 views

What “propagates” a force through the rest of a solid?

So, in typing the title of this question I was recommended this awesome one, which confirmed my guess that this effect "propagates" at the speed of sound (though I just had a feeling, I don't really ...
3
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2answers
86 views

What does an analog voice transmission look like in the visible spectrum?

Analog radio signals are transmitted using light in the radio area of the spectrum. If it was transmitted using the visible spectrum instead (using a visible light emitting device instead of a radio ...