Acoustics is the interdisciplinary science that deals with the study of all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids including vibration, sound, ultrasound and infrasound. Applications of acoustics are for instance the audio and noise control industries.

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Physical intuition on vortex sound generation

Whenever a fluid has a nonzero vorticity, it looses some of its energy in a form of sound wave. Formally is this mechanism described by Lighthill's equation or some related model (like e.g. Curle's ...
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68 views

what is the relationship between the diameter and frequency of a driver?

What is the relationship between the diameter of a speaker/woofer, and the frequency it is capable of reproducing?
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356 views

What does a blackbody sound like?

Update: According to this wikipedia article, blackbody radiation is just thermal noise (Johnson–Nyquist noise); if that's what I'm looking for, what does it sound like? If a blackbody has a ...
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75 views

How can one change the virtual position of a sound source with a fixed array of speakers?

I have a question about signal processing: How to make a person, sitting between array of two loudspeakers (one from the left and one from his right), hear the sound that came from both loudspeakers, ...
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210 views

How loud would a sound have to be to be heard around the world?

I'm reading the book Cosmos by Carl Sagan, and in it he states: Striking the Earth's atmosphere, a modest cometary fragment would produce a great radiant fireball and a mighty blast wave, which ...
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180 views

Acoustical wave equation from Hamilton's principle

It is common to show the features and power of the Hamilton's principle by deriving the equation of vibrating string, membrane etc. using this principle. But I have never seen that used for deriving ...
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44 views

Waves and osciilation [closed]

When intensity of sound increases increases to 10 times level of sound increases by 10 decibel why and how the sound intensity is related to sound level
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99 views

What it sounds like when I'm travelling at the speed of sound

totally hypothetical here: lets say a man is playing a song on a guitar and I begin travelling quickly away from the guitar, if I were to reach the speed of sound, what will I hear? (my assumption ...
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66 views

Do sound waves travel before Big Bang?

So I was reading a Scientific American article about how the universe is spreading apart and how it is getting faster. But in the article there was something that baffled be and it was this "Sound ...
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Why don't choir voices destructively interfere so that we can't hear them?

Sound is propagated by waves. Waves can interfere. Suppose there are two tenors standing next to each other and each singing a continuous middle-C. Will it be the case that some people in the ...
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58 views

Sound wave in a Vacuum

If a Tuning fork was Struck in a Vacuum what happens to the resonant frequency of the fork and the potential sound wave. Does the wave leave the fork?
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83 views

How to detect “noisiness” of sound wave?

Some phonemes like "ssss" are basically white noise. How would you determine which parts of a wave are white noise? From frequency analysis the white noise will have no tones so just using this would ...
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73 views

How to derive end-correction value relationship for open-ended air columns?

According to Young and Freedman's Physics textbook, in open-ended air columns like some woodwind instruments, the position of the displacement antinode extends a tiny amount beyond the end of the ...
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132 views

The Speed of Sound [duplicate]

Just a question about Physics I'm doing at school. If the speed of sound is inversely proportional to the density of a material, why does sound travel faster in solids (it is the most dense). I have ...
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58 views

does the Fresnel approximation apply in the far field?

Most sources I've looked at treat far field diffraction and near field diffraction as separate cases, with the former using the Fraunhofer approximation and the latter the Fresnel approximation. In ...
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1answer
58 views

How can a string vibrating in a plane radiate sound?

If a plucked guitar string vibrates in a plane, how are waves produced that travel in all directions? I'd have thought that a vibrating string can only produce waves in its plane of motion.
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1answer
83 views

Why are exploding HHO bubbles louder then pure HHO?

We tried my electrolyzer with a friend today, we filled a small bottle with HHO gas, and set it on fire. It was loud but not a big deal, like a firecracker. Then we added some soapy water and created ...
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75 views

Mach Number after Normal Shock

Is there any way that someone can give me more of a conceptual explanation for the fact that the Mach number downstream of a normal shock must be less than or equal to 1? I understand the ...
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2k views

Why are ultrasounds used for producing images of body organs?

Low frequency waves can penetrate better than high frequency waves, then why are high frequency waves used in ultrasounds for sharper images? Similar is the case in detection of flaws in metal ...
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32 views

Reverberating sounds?

I know a home where there are two television sets in two different rooms. The TV sets are diametrically opposed to each other. When I move from one sound source of TV one to TV two a phenomenon ...
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173 views

Physical interpretation of source term in wave equations

Let me start with an example. If we base our calculations on the Newton's second law without any further mathematical treatment, then our equation describes equilibrium of forces, i.e. it is of the ...
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55 views

How would I calculate the frequency of the sound produced by a bowed glass plate?

I'm working on a project that involves getting a note to sound from a glass plate by bowing its edge with a violin bow. I'm trying to work out exactly what frequency I'll get from a piece of glass of ...
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82 views

What's the relationship between the tension of string and the decay rate of its vibrations?

It seems that the more tension on the string, the more slowly the sound would decay after being plucked. Is there a formula relating the two? How is it derived?
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57 views

Overtones of Bells Over A Distance

The hourly bell tower sound at Indiana University Bloomington sounds like a higher frequency when heard from ~1.4 km away, compared to standing right next to it. Is this effect likely due to the ...
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43 views

Properties of infrasound of our muscles?

I have read, that some animals (like cats) are able to hear other animals (like humans) staying still by percepting infrasound, emmited by their muscles. Is this true? I know, muscles are really ...
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47 views

Pitch and loudness relation

Using an Oscillator in a program, I noticed that the lower and the higher frequencies are less loud than the middle ones. I suspect there is a relation between pitch and loudness but can it be ...
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156 views

Intensity of sound vs Speed of sound

I am finding out the relationship between intensity of sound and speed of sound. To do that, I am using this equation: $$I =\frac{∆P^2_{\rm max}}{2ρv}$$ where ∆P max = Pressure amplitude, I = ...
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42 views

What is the equation of motion for multiple simultaneous pressure waves in a medium? (In the context of stimulated Brillouin scattering)

My overall motivation is to derive the behavior of Brillouin scattering in a birefringent fiber. Brillouin scattering is a nonlinear interaction between light and sound. In classic Brillouin ...
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79 views

In a sound wave, is there rarefactions at both ends?

I was reading my book Physics, For scientists and Engineers, Third Edition, by Randall D. Knight, studying the first chapter on waves. This diagram is provided on page 565: The diagram is easy to ...
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64 views

Sound when traveling faster than sound

I was wondering, if I am running at the speed of sound while playing music on my iPod will I be able to listen to my iPod while running at the speed of sound? or we cant hear anything while running at ...
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2answers
545 views

What is meant by thermal penetration depth?

What is meant by thermal penetration depth? I am doing a project on Thermoacoustics. while researching I came across about thermal penetration depth.I searched over the net but i didn't get a clear ...
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1answer
89 views

Where exactly is the antinode of an air column with open-closed boundary conditions?

Suppose that I have an air column with closed-open boundary condition. The air pressure at the open end of the tube is constrained to match the atmospheric pressure of the surrounding air. ...
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84 views

Sound in stirred hot fluids

If a hot beverage in a cup gets stirred, the sound of the spoon changes. You can easily hear this if you repeatedly cling the spoon to the cup ground after stirring. The cling sound will raise in tune ...
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148 views

Relationship between sound pressure level and amplitude of signal

I have a loudspeaker. Let's say that I feed a signal to it, say, a pure sine wave: $$f(t) = a \sin(\omega t).$$ How does the sound pressure of the resulting sound relate to the amplitude $a$? Is ...
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30 views

Undamped oscillations of sound wave

I read in google that When we hit some metal or object, then a sound is generated by that object. If we hit that object with more force, then we can hear a sound of more amplitude than previous one ...
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148 views

Why velocity potential?

(Aero-)Acoustics (among other parts of fluid-dynamics) loves the velocity potential $\varphi$ defined as $\vec{v} = \nabla \ \varphi$ with the condition of $\nabla \times \ \vec{v} = 0$. I am ...
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142 views

Why is perceived sound intensity based on a log10 scale?

Decibels are logarithmic with a base of 10. I've been told before that two car horns are not twice as loud as one car horn. Rather, it takes ten car horns to be twice as loud, because of the log10 ...
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38 views

Can we tune the exhaust system of a gasoline car to be as quiet as an electric car? [closed]

Electric cars are quiet, so quiet that legislation is proposed in many countries, to make them audible to pedestrians, for obvious safety reasons. My question: is it possible, without getting into ...
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43 views

Can you record sound through vacuum? Like this: (object)(vacuum)(object)

There are these videos on youtube that play sound of Jupiter for example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3fqE01YYWs Does anyone know if this is real at all? How can you record sound through vacuum ...
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1answer
44 views

What information do we lose when we increase whale songs to our hearing range?

TV documentaries on marine life often feature the evocative sounds of whales communicating with each other (apparently), over very long distances. The frequency of baleen whale sounds ranges from 10 ...
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4answers
266 views

Speed of sound in vacuum

I am not a scientist but I have a question about speed of sound in vacuum. All I know is that the speed of sound $v$ in a medium is given by formula $$v= \sqrt{\frac E\rho},$$ where $E$ is elasticity ...
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150 views

Grand Canyon Sound Problem Troubles

Yesterday, I got a question in class, this is the question: If you shout into the Grand Canyon, your voice travels at the speed of sound (340m/s) to the bottom of the canyon and back, and you hear an ...
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Wave equation - Cases where separation of variables doesn't work

Separation of variables combined with the Fourier's theorem is the most common technique of solving D'Alembert's wave equation: $$ \Delta\Phi-\frac{1}{c_0^2}\frac{\partial^2 \Phi}{\partial t^2}=0 $$ ...
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1answer
439 views

Why can we hear sound better on the water than on land?

If we sit in a boat on a lake we can often hear people talking on the shore clearly in contrast to sitting in an empty field and hearing the people talk over the same distance. I heard that this ...
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1answer
176 views

Influence of acceleration in acoustic doppler's effect experiment

Recently I've done an acoustic doppler's effect experiment for physics lab assignment. The setup was two microphones in a straight line, movable object with sound source and a pc with the usual sound ...
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2answers
101 views

How can the choice of wood make a good violin?

We always hear about some really fine and expensive wood that is used to make guitars, violins and other musical instruments. What's the physics behind this? What parameters (e.g. bulk modulus etc.) ...
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200 views

Using a laser to overhear a room conversation

Movies with science based tricks and gimmicks are generally silly and sometimes even annoying. The science based trick that I don't know enough about to judge is the following (and I have seen it in a ...
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2answers
78 views

Refraction, diffraction or reflection of human voice

Why is possible to hear in an open space someone's voice even if he's not facing me? Is it because of refraction, diffraction or reflection of the sound wave?
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36 views

Does background noise while strumming a string affect the frequency recorded?

Does the interference of the waves cause instances of destructive interference where there is no amplitude. Technically the wave is still there although its amplitude is 'cancelled' out but those ...
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144 views

Do two waves of different frequencies create a resultant wave of lower frequency?

In my results for testing background noise, i found that while strumming a guitar in: a noisy area, the frequency picked up by the mic was 352 Hz while in a quiet area, the frequency picked up by ...