Acoustics is the interdisciplinary science that deals with the study of all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids including vibration, sound, ultrasound and infrasound. Applications of acoustics are for instance the audio and noise control industries.

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Does mechanical resonance of an object changes in different surrounding medium?

When comparing mechanical resonance of an object (for example string) in air and in water, does the resonance frequency changes? My guess is that it does change because the surrounding medium will ...
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Is it possible to impart a moment with soundwaves?

How can one adjust the properties of a sound wave to use it to spin an arbitrary object of shape S in a medium comprised of the same material. My intuition tells me that it would be much more ...
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168 views

Why can't light waves bend? [duplicate]

Assume that you fixed a speaker to an inclined pipe as well the torch. You can hear sound from the other end of the pipe, but can't see the light from other end of the pipe, why?
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258 views

Why doesn't amplitude affect the speed of sound?

I understand why amplitude doesn't affect the speed of the sound AFTER the 'leading compression'. The extra force provided on one stage of the cycle is countered on the other stage. But shouldn't the ...
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882 views

How does a Trumpet loud speaker work? [closed]

I pierced a hole in a cone shaped cardboard's tip and attached it to my phone speaker. Surprisingly the sound produced when attached is three times louder than the sound when it is removed. I do know ...
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20 views

Bass and acute tones. Perceiving their direction

In a modern sound system, you put the sub-woofer somewhere on the floor, not worrying much about its position, but putting the loud speaker around my ears, to generate a sound-surround effect. I ...
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61 views

How to calculate frequency in the following question [closed]

A police car with a siren of frequency $8$ kHz is moving with uniform velocity $36 \mathrm{km}\, \mathrm{hr}^{-1}$ towards a tall building which reflects the sound waves. The speed of sound in air is ...
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45 views

Could one estimate the size of air-molecules based on analysis of the sound?

Say one knows air is composed of molecules (atoms). Could one estimate the size of molecules (atoms) by analysing the sound properties as one perceives them (clearness, speed, etc.)?
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Why doesn't more light bounce off of things in the manner of sound?

If I'm sitting in the den with my door slightly cracked, I can hear my wife washing dishes in the kitchen down the hall. But why can't I also 'see' images of her washing dishes if, say, I looked up on ...
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106 views

Help w/ speed of sound experiment report question

Experiment was done by using an oscilloscope and a piezoelectric transducer to generate ultrasonic sound waves. We had to move the transmitter whilst receiver remains constant on a angled 1 meter ...
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407 views

What is sympathetic resonance?

When two tuning forks stand near one another and one is excited, the other rings as well. When high notes are struck on a piano, lower notes are also heard. If I understand correctly, this is called ...
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129 views

Is there a max loud?

Take two laptops with build-in mics and speakers. Put them next to each other. Turn skype on both of them, and call each other. Laptop A should now be in a voip call with Laptop B. Talking into ...
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29 views

Perception of sound in varying temperature

If one disregards situations like explosions (where air is heated) etc. and also disregards humidity – does temperature affect sound in any way for the observer? Say for example one listens to a ...
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80 views

How are complex sound waves combined?

Audio is often explained by single frequencies. Typically this is a sound wave: plot sin(x) * 2 from 0 to 10 However we usually deal with more complex sounds, ...
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How do traveling waves pass through a standing wave node, if the node doesn't move?

I'm having trouble with the explanation that a standing wave in a string is the superposition of traveling waves. The nodes in the diagram above are points where the particles of the string's ...
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1answer
50 views

What can you use voice sound for? [closed]

Moreover, how can you make your voice productive? for example, using it to light an LED, charge a battery, purificating water, growing plants in a more efficient way. I want to do a project that ...
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1answer
75 views

Interference - the shortest way from the point of constructive one to the point of destructive one

So this is a problem from Polish maturity exam. The image shows 2 speakers (G1, G2) and point B. The wavelength of sound coming from both speakers is 0.155 m, and the wave coming from both speakers ...
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120 views

What does a constant signal sound like?

Say I was sampling a sound incorrectly and it produced a constant signal as below: What would this signal sound like? In Matlab, it plays nothing. Is this correct?
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297 views

How loud is the thermal motion of air molecules?

In other words, given a magical room with walls that produce no vibration and transmit zero vibration from the outside, and nothing on the inside except room temperature air, what would be the noise ...
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225 views

Relation between pressure and particle displacement in an acoustic wave

Consider an acoustic wave in some medium, expressed as particle displacement: $$s(t,x) = e^{j(-\omega t + kx)} $$ I understand that pressure must be at its maximum when the particle displacement is ...
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Can the motion of a cracking whip be described as the interference of two waves?

I was watching a whip crack in slow motion and I noticed that the motion of the whip could be described using two different circular descriptions. 1) the user circles the whip around over his head, ...
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60 views

Does sound gets faster when air bubble is supend in water?

Does sound gets faster when air bubble is suspend in water? c = sqrt(K/P) c = speed K = bulk module P = density When air bubbles is homogenized into water the density is lower, so should sound ...
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2answers
182 views

Is work done by sound wave on air particles?

Is it possible for sound wave to do net work on air particles? As in can a sound wave make the air move in one direction so that it can for example move a sail boat ? I think since molecules gyrate ...
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What is the physical origin of acoustic modes in a duct?

Lets deal with wave propagation in a cylindrical duct. We ask the question: "what is the general form of a pressure wave which can propagate through the duct?" In answering this, we assume that the ...
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3answers
69 views

How does ultrasonic horn produce a convection current in the water?

When I was using ultrasonic horn in a beaker, I notice that there are convection currents in the beaker and stir up my substance. I don't understand why it produce water current, I thought that it ...
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What is the difference between a puff of air and a sound wave regarding creation and propagation?

While watching a Schlieren video of a hand clapping, I noted a very distinct difference between a sound wave and a puff of air, which were both created by a hand clapping. What is the difference ...
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Does timbre consist in pitch and volume?

I read that the physical properties of a sound wave correspond to its audible qualities: pitch, volume, and timbre. However, an oscilloscope uses only two-dimensions to accurately depict the physical ...
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How to model “Doppler Distortion” of speakers?

Simple Model w/o Doppler I have a speaker driven by an electrical signal. The pressure at the sampling point is some linear operator acting on the input signal: $L[ s(t)]$. Where $L$ combines the ...
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542 views

Frequency of touch, taste, and scent [closed]

So I was thinking about sound - and how anything below 20Hz is basically inaudible to humans (because it is too low of a frequency to be recognized), as well as anything above around 20KHz (because it ...
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180 views

Why are two voices singing the same note louder than one?

Let's say for example: Two people sing the same note (frequency) and volume (amplitude) together. Why is it that the two persons sound louder than they would ...
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3answers
299 views

Would we be able to hear the sun if space were full of air? [duplicate]

I was wondering if the sun could be audible from earth in an air-filled space scenario. We can ignore all the other disastrous consequences! Thanks!
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Does sound absorption depends upon the amplitude of sound wave?

I can understand the mechanism of frequency dependant sound absorption by most materials but does the sound attenuation also depends upon the AMPLITUDE(sound pressure or rather loudness/sound ...
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135 views

Do Pulsar Stars produce sound?

Can I hear electromagnetic radiation coming from a pulsar star? Or can I hear it if I stand outside it?
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207 views

Does the Sun produce audible sound?

Theoretically if I were able to build some sort of device that let me sit 1 foot away from the surface of the Sun (or any star for that matter) without being vaporized, would a star produce any sort ...
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Number of wave modes in a cavity

I'm trying to calculate the number of acoustic modes that can exist in a room in a certain range of frequencies. I thought of using the Rayleigh-Jeans formula for the electromagnetic standing wave ...
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What physical properties of silver would contribute to the sound of a musical instrument?

Sorry if this is off-topic. A question was recently asked on Musical Practice & Performance, asking what physical properties of silver would contribute to the sound of percussion instruments. It ...
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Are small speakers inherently limited to higher frequencies?

I am hoping to build a subwoofer using multiple smaller speakers (165mm) instead of a single larger speaker (380mm). My theory is that the displaced air volume is what matters, not the individual ...
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3answers
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Are there any musical instruments which use resonance tubes with two closed ends?

Many musical instruments use resonance tubes with one closed end - all brass instruments (I think), clarinet, etc. There are also instruments where both ends are open (flute, pipes) Are there any ...
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72 views

Why do the chargers produce persistent high pitch sound?

I have noticed that my Nexus Orb charger and a charger for the shaver produce some unpleasant high pitch sounds - near the fork. Why are they doing this? Does it indicate any problem with my ...
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About our voice transferred into electrical signal

I know when we speak to the microphone, the pitch of our voice cause the vibration of magnet in the microphone, thus causing generation of different voltages of electrical signal. But my question is: ...
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Why does a microphone membrane only measure pressure and not particle velocity?

Microphones (e.g. condenser microphone) are assumed to have a voltage output proportional to the sound pressure at the diaphragm. If the operating principle is that the voltage output is proportional ...
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Justifying order of magnitude reasoning

So in the context of a set of notes I am reading about acoustics I get to equation (23) in this paper. Basically it comes down to showing that (note the dots above the a's meaning time derivative!) ...
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What is sound in terms of acoustic sources?

Sound is nothing more than small amplitude, unsteady pressure perturbations that propagate as a longitudinal wave from a region in space which created it (called the source region) into a quiescent ...
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Does vortex shedding exist along the surface of an object?

Vortex shedding occurs due to the detachment of flow. The typical example is for the oscillating wake behind a cylinder, and has a frequency related to the size of the object. I want to know, if a ...
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What is the longest distance over which echolocation is effective?

Some animals, most notably bats, use echolocation in order to navigate and detect the location and size of objects and prey. This usually takes place over short distances. What are the theoretical ...
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151 views

Harmonic frequencies of electric guitar are detuned. What could be the cause?

I have tried to record some music with my electric guitar and while playing around and looking the frequencies of single strings I noticed something strange. I took the spectra of the A string and I ...
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6answers
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Without seeing the lightning, can you tell how far away it struck by how the thunder sounds?

Is there any way to tell how far away a lightning strike is by how its thunder sounds? I thought one way might be by using the fact that higher frequencies travel faster than lower frequencies. Would ...
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1answer
261 views

Will a sound composed of the frequencies 450Hz, 650Hz 850Hz have a clearly defined musical pitch? Why?

According to my lecturer, the perceived pitch of a sound composed of the following harmonics: 750Hz, 1000Hz, 1250Hz is equal to the fundamental frequency which is the highest common factor of the ...
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7answers
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Why can't you hear music well over a telephone line?

Why can't you hear music well well over a telephone line? I was asked this question in an interview for a university study placement and I unfortunately had no idea. I was given the hint that the ...
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The sound when boiling water [duplicate]

One can hear some sounds when boiling water, and usually the sound is loud initially, then it becomes quieter. When the water is about to boil, the sound starts to be louder again. Also, one may ...