Linked Questions

10
votes
5answers
2k views

Consequences of the new theorem in QM?

It seems there is a new theorem that changes the rules of the game in the interpretational debate on QM: http://www.nature.com/news/quantum-theorem-shakes-foundations-1.9392 Does this only leave ...
18
votes
1answer
2k views

In 't Hooft beable models, do measurements keep states classical?

This is a questions on 't Hooft's beable models (see here: Discreteness and Determinism in Superstrings?) for quantum mechanics, and the goal is to understand to what extent these succeed in ...
4
votes
6answers
768 views

Why do some physicists believe that scalable quantum computing is possible? [closed]

If you drop a glass cup on the ground, it will break and shatter into pieces. This happens all the time and is consistent with quantum mechanics. But it never happens that a shattered glass cup ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'

I'm having trouble unambiguously interpreting many answers here due to the fact that the terms locality and causality are sometimes used interchangeably, while other times seem to mean very different ...
4
votes
2answers
431 views

Shor's algorithm and Bohmian Mechanics

Do quantum computer's tell us anything about the foundations of quantum theory? In particular Shor argued in the famous thread by 't Hooft Why do people categorically dismiss some simple quantum ...
7
votes
1answer
871 views

How does the holographic principle imply nonlocality?

For example in the discussions here and here there are comments by Ron Maimon: Your complaint about locality would be more serious if holography didn't show the way--- the CFT in AdS/CFT ...
5
votes
2answers
486 views

How can we be sure that nature isn't “faking” quantum statistics?

In a recent publication, Experimentally Faking the Violation of Bell’s Inequalities (Gerhardt 2011) (arXiv version), the statistics of quantum mechanics is faked using classical light sources. But if ...
1
vote
3answers
231 views

Is it possible that there is no theory of quantum gravity? [closed]

{{Under Construction}} Short question: What published works and what research groups are investigating the possibility of inexistance of gravity at quantum level? Long question: I am no ...
1
vote
3answers
230 views

Is a quantum system mandatory for generating true random sequence?

Is a quantum system necessary if we want to generate true random sequence? The mathematical framework used for classical mechanics doesn't involve any random value. But the mathematical framework of ...
5
votes
1answer
470 views

't Hooft for laypersons

I have looked at some of 't Hooft's recent papers and, unfortunately, they are well beyond my current level of comprehension. The same holds for the discussions that took place on this website. (See, ...
5
votes
1answer
323 views

If quantum mechanics is ultimately deterministic, would Shor's factorization algorithm still work for large integers?

Victor Stenger argues that the apparent randomness in quantum mechanics is a result of the randomness in the macroscopic detectors (similar to the randomness in the laws of thermodynamics) and is not ...
2
votes
4answers
297 views

The building blocks of energy

I have a couple of related questions that have been bothering me for a while. They might sound unscientific, but here is goes: What are the building blocks of energy? What does energy consist of? Is ...
5
votes
1answer
244 views

How necessary is the “exponential explosion” in quantum mechanics?

In the 't Hooft threads, the exponential explosion is mentioned several times. No one seems to like it. But it is an integral part of the standard formalism. It seems to arise from the tensor product ...