Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for active researchers, academics and students of physics. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is there something rather than nothing?

And before you answer "God did it," consider Carl Sagan's reply "then how did God come about?"

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Tobias Kienzler, Cedric H., Pratik Deoghare, mbq, nibot Nov 16 '10 at 15:48

Questions on Physics Stack Exchange are expected to relate to physics within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Way too off-topic. If there were nothing you woundn't ask (I is much more profound that it may seem). –  Piotr Migdal Nov 16 '10 at 13:56
2  
Because. [ ](emp.ty) –  Tobias Kienzler Nov 16 '10 at 14:01
1  
This question should be closed... –  Cedric H. Nov 16 '10 at 14:15
    
Not a physics question, and I'd say it's a bad philosophy question. But then, I'm biased towards analytic philosophy. –  Raskolnikov Nov 16 '10 at 14:15
    
Sydney Coleman and others published on this question, considering it really as the subquestion referring to why the apparent matter/antimatter asymmetry, which of course is now the subject of active experimentation. Furthermore a subquestion could refer to the origin of inflation, assuming that it occurred. I vote to edit the question and reopen. –  sigoldberg1 Nov 16 '10 at 19:57

1 Answer 1

The question is unanswerable. If I tell you "because P", then you can simply ask what caused P.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Manishearth Dec 2 '12 at 2:06
    
@Manishearth: I actually think that this is as good an answer as can be provided to this question. Any scientific explanation will have to rely on some general laws, and then the question would indeed become "but why do these laws hold?". –  Yvan Velenik Jan 19 '13 at 9:47
    
@YvanVelenik: True. This is why the question was closed, it really can't be answered properly via physics. –  Manishearth Jan 19 '13 at 9:49

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.