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At the current LHC luminosities, will it take years to detect the Higgs boson, superpartners, or any other forms of new physics at the LHC? What should particle physicists do in the meantime?

We particle physicists have been waiting too long now for experimental input.

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I think each one of the particles you mention could get a whole book written on the topic. Perhaps it'd be best if you split the question to ask for one thing at a time. But perhaps not, I'll leave it to your discretion. –  Marek Apr 16 '11 at 10:04
    
This makes the usual mistake of treating the colliders as all of particle physics. Neutrinos are active right now, direct dark matter is ramping up, physics in the non-perturbative regime has been tooling along at JLAB for 15 years and is still pouring out data. –  dmckee Apr 16 '11 at 14:54

1 Answer 1

As particle physicists know, the detection of Higgs at the LHC will depend on the cross section for producing it as well as at what mass it is. There exists a working group Report of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group .

The calculations show that the higher the mass of the Higgs the smaller the cross section of inclusive production at pp scattering in the LHC energy range.

Here are some limits already given by CMS.

The answer is patience and keeping fingers crossed that nature has a low mass Higgs.

Here is an analysis for low luminosity detection.

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""and keeping fingers crossed that nature has a low mass Higgs."" I think that a rabbits foot attached to the detector is more promising :=) –  Georg Apr 16 '11 at 12:15
    
"the detection of Higgs at the LHC will depend on the cross section for producing it as well as at what mass it is" and the backgrounds, and various things related to detector calibration and software tuning, and and and... –  dmckee Apr 16 '11 at 14:50

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