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Since we know that all accelerated charges radiate energy and we also know that all matter is made up of protons and electrons which are all the while doing accelerated motion.So from this can i conclude that every piece of matter radiates energy because of jiggling motion of atoms?

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possible duplicate of Why don't electrons crash into the nuclei they "orbit"? –  Michael Brown Jun 21 '13 at 5:38
    
Are you asking if a neutral object, e.g. a hydrogen atom, would radiate EM waves when it accelerates? If so, then this seems a good question to me. I think the answer is no, an accelerated hydrogen atom would not radiate. While Anna's answer is correct, the radiation comes from transient oscillating dipoles and I suspect this is different to what you're asking. –  John Rennie Jun 21 '13 at 6:45
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marked as duplicate by Michael Brown, AlanSE, Manishearth Jun 28 '13 at 17:55

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Sahil, if you are interested in physics you should take some physics courses because from your questions a lot of misunderstanding shows.

In this particular case you are confusing two aspects of matter, and though all matter does radiate , it is called black body radiation , and it is a statistical effect of the random motion of atoms and molecules in matter, your line of thinking is off.

The answer to this argument

Since we know that all accelerated charges radiate energy and we also know that all matter is made up of protons and electrons which are all the while doing accelerated motion

is No.

All accelerated charges radiate in the classical regime, i.e. in sizes before we can distinguish that atoms and molecules exist. Quantum mechanics evolved while trying to describe the conundrum: how can atoms exist with electrons running around them and the electrons do not fall into the nucleus because of losing energy by radiation? Quantum mechanics is the solution , because the orbitals of the electrons are stable and no energy is lost.

So how can black body radiation appear from the neutral atoms and molecules? Their electric and magnetic fields are spatially distorted around them and new forces appear which bind the atoms into molecules and solid matter for example, and the quantum mechanical solutions for this forces for vibrating or bouncing ( gas) atoms has very small transition layers among the energy states which with the motion release and absorb the appropriate photons and in the balance a portion of these photons radiates a black body radiation.

When we are talking at the level of atoms it is the quantum mechanical framework that should be used, not the classical.

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