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Suppose we have a building in an area with weather conditions $W_t$ at time $t$, and suppose we could change the relative humidity $\phi_t \in W_t$. Would the change in relative humidity $\phi_t$ have effect on some room/office within that building?

I'm making assumptions which can't be made in real situations, and am aware of that. But just solely to get some insights; this question. Isolation? I don't make any assumptions.

(notice that the sun is at the same position during the humidity change, along with the "non-moving" clouds etc.)

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The average temperature will be a little higher and more stable.

Stable because of increased heat capacity.

Higher because humid air will absorb more solar energy.

But I believe that these real changes in temperature will be negligible compared to temperature changes reported by the workers in the office. Their cooling will become slower (because the evaporation will become slower) and they might compare the office to the Tashkent city.

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So, change in degrees celsius outside will be very small. Though it does effect the HVAC control (actually cooling) in the fact that a higher humidity causes a smaller cooling rate compared to a lower humidity? Would the latter be significant? EDIT: And what about Tashkent city? –  user61001 May 19 '13 at 18:43
    
"Tashkent" is synonymous for "very hot". What's with the outside? I don't really understand the new question. –  Juris May 19 '13 at 20:44
    
What did you mean with "But I believe that these real changes in temperature will be negligible compared to temperature changes reported by the workers in the office."? Is there a difference between the real changes and those reported by the workers? Are you refering to apparent temperature? –  user61001 May 20 '13 at 15:45
    
@user61001, yes, apparent one. If humidity is higher, it seems hotter to people compared to medium or low humidity. –  Juris May 22 '13 at 21:31
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