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The Bragg condition (by Bragg in 1913) can be derived by the Laue equations that is making use of the Miller indices and all the latice/crystal stuff (so basically it's bringing Bragg's law to more fundamental ground).

But what is interesting to me: When did the "Laue way" came up? Was it only named after Max von Laue or did he himself publish a paper introducing this formalism?

Neither Wikipedia nor the books I have are citing it. The Laue diffraction/condition/law is always just presented without origin. But I'd like to find it's real origin.

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When did the "Laue way" came up? Was it only named after Max von Laue or did he himself publish a paper introducing this formalism?

Max von Laue submitted his equations for publication 08 June 1912. The paper is W. Friedrich, P. Knipping and M. Laue, "Interferenzerscheinungen bei Röntgenstrahlen ", Annalen der Physik, volume 346, issue 10, pages 971-988, 1913 . It is also cited as Sitzungberichte. Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, pp. 303-322 (1912). There is also a 1981 English translation by J. Stezowski as "Interference phenomona for X-rays" in Benchmark Papers in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics.

Laue's equations came first; then Bragg developed the simplified condition.

See Early Days of X-ray Crystallography, by Andre Authier for more infomation.

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