Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for active researchers, academics and students of physics. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's assume that we have bottle of beer on the Moon. What would happen to it in sunlight? Some cases:

  1. Beer can be dark or lager.

  2. It can be contained in glass bottle (transparent or dark) or aluminium can.

Will it freeze or vaporize or what?

share|improve this question
    
Is the can/bottle open or closed? –  Dmitry Brant Dec 4 '12 at 15:50
1  
Just curious: why (tasty, tasty) beer and not for example soda, water or wine? –  Alenanno Dec 4 '12 at 15:50
    
Oh, you can look at both cases. I don't know why beer. Maybe because Alan Guth generated some ideas in pub. –  pink.fascist Dec 4 '12 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

According to NASA, the temperature on the Moon in direct sunshine can reach 400K and this is above the boiling point of beer. So the beer will boil and possibly burst it's container depending on how strong the container is.

The same article tells us the the temperature falls to only 100K at night, so at night the beer would freeze.

The colour of the beer and/or the bottle may change the rate at which it boils or freezes because a dark beer and/or bottle will absorb more sunlight. However the end result will be the same.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but it says >100 K to <400 K, so 400K is extreme temperature. I think the only question is about B.P. –  pink.fascist Dec 4 '12 at 19:57
    
Yes, 400K is only 27K above the boiling point, and that temperature is at the equator so if the beer was nearer the poles the boiling would be even more questionable. However remember that daylight lasts 14 days on the Moon, so the beer will be in the sunshine for a long time. –  John Rennie Dec 5 '12 at 6:49

The pressure on the moon is essentially zero, and the liquid would (almost, unless you have some real exotic beer) certainly vaporize. Any (regular) container would explode due to the pressure applied by the liquid molecules inside, and the lack of pressure pushing the liquid together would cause the liquid to vaporize.

Even if it freezes, when that side of the moon sees the sun... temperatures skyrocket and liquid vaporizes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.