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Knowing

* earth spin and translation movement around sun,
* sun have a big magnetic field,
* a variable flux can generate a induced voltage (and current) into the circuit

Would it be posible to receive in a coil that energy?

Perhaps it's just enough to detecting the earth movement relative to magnetic field, or if it were strong enough even for use the energy.

It doesn't seem to be so strong because if it where perhaps every coil in earth without a current generated by this flux variation.

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Is it possible that the Sun's magnetic field may not manifest itself on a coil on Earth's surface in because Earth's field is relatively closer? –  Everyone Jul 17 '12 at 18:34
    
If the sun's magnetic field is oriented the same way as the earth's, the flux through your coil wouldn't change very much. –  endolith Sep 24 '12 at 18:50

2 Answers 2

Its good of you thinking to find an alternate sources of energy. I appreciate that.

Coming to the question, you cannot because the strength of the magnetic field is low and there is a lot of interference with the earth's magnetic field. And, you may ask that why cant we use the magnetic field to produce energy? First, the magnetic strength of the earth is 31 µT. So, in order to produce 1 Volt in a 1m length wire you need to make it travel at a speed of 32258.065 meters per second.

Do you really wanna do that??

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As this Wikipedia article explains - the field strength of the Sun's magnetic field at the earth is about 0.1 nT (nano Tesla). For comparison, the magnetic field of a cell phone is thought to be somewhere in the region of 1000 nT.

So the magnetic field of the sun at the earth's surface is laughably small, and will be swamped by the stray magnetic fields of our electronic devices. So there is no useful way to harness that energy from the Earth's surface.

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