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I have a plastic container and want to make sure that infrared radiation (specifically, in the 750-850 nanometer range) cannot pass through it. Would wrapping it in aluminum foil do the trick? If not, what household material would be best? The fluence of the radiation is around 22J/cm^2.

Thank you very much!

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You can avoid/reflect incoming infrared radiation, but as the material heats up, it will reirradiate that heat as infrared radiation as well. –  user56771 Nov 4 '12 at 3:03
    
I would be quite surprised if your plastic container didn't already block those wavelengths, but I don't know how to find out for sure. –  Nathaniel Nov 4 '12 at 4:40
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Does the container have to allow visible light through? If not then foil would work. If you want a high pass filter, i.e. block wavelengths less than 750nm but allow everything above this wavelength, you'll need to be a bit more cunning. –  John Rennie Nov 4 '12 at 9:11

1 Answer 1

The chart for the reflectance of aluminum tells us that it should do the job for you. But it will likely block anything else within that spectral range, see the plot! reflectivity aluminum

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You can avoid/reflect incoming infrared radiation, but as the material heats up, it will reirradiate that heat as infrared radiation as well. –  user56771 Nov 4 '12 at 3:03
    
Not at 750-800nm until it gets very very hot! –  Martin Beckett Nov 4 '12 at 18:38
    
It is worth noting that even when the reflection is not quite 100%, that doesn't mean light can pass through the aluminum foil. The rest gets absorbed, not transmitted. (Unless the aluminum is under ~50 nanometers thick, for visible and near-IR!) –  Steve B Nov 5 '12 at 1:52
    
@SteveB: Good addition! –  elcojon Nov 5 '12 at 18:09

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