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If one covers up one eye, then he loses depth perception (two dimensional perspective). When we uncover that eye, we can now see depth (three dimensional perspective). My question is if we had four eyes, would we be able to see from a four dimensional perspective?

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No, one can't have a higher-dimensional perspective than the reality and the reality only has 3 large spatial dimensions. –  Luboš Motl Sep 29 '12 at 4:15
    
To get four-dimensional depth perception, you would need two or more eyes that each have a three-dimensional "surface" where the 4D light enters. (And there would need to be four large dimensions for you to see into.) –  Mitchell Porter Oct 3 '12 at 13:00
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No.

The world we observe with our five senses is three dimensional. Two independent measurements are enough to calculate the three dimensional position of everything, which is what our brain does with the input of two eyes.

More eyes would only over constrain the solution, and might help in low lighting or long distance estimates when the errors are large.

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Thanks. Would more eyes affect us in any regard/situation other than in low lighting or long distance estimates? –  qegal Sep 29 '12 at 4:29
    
Everywhere where there were large visual errors for some reason, as for example side viewing. Many insects have in effect many eye, as their eyes are faceted. That is because they are in danger from a lot of predators and have to make fast decisions where to move to. Overconstrained solutions minimize errors. –  anna v Sep 29 '12 at 5:21
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Your eyes are really just recording a flat image focused on your retina--it is your brain that extrapolates distance by comparing two images. In a way, you only see in two dimensions.

If you had a third eye, you might have better depth perception (if you had enough brain function to process that much data).

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Thanks. I selected Anna's post as the answer because she posted first, but your answer was just as informative and helpful so I +1'd it. –  qegal Sep 29 '12 at 4:30
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