Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for active researchers, academics and students of physics. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Similar question has been asked but did no get good answers.

We know that black hole can confine light, but can we create an ocean black hole - which can confine surface water waves or sound waves in water?

Definition:

  • What is a static water flow which can CONFINE water waves?
  • Is there a configuration confining only surface waves?
  • Is there a configuration confining volume waves?

Description:

Inside a confined region any water density perturbations can not propagate outside.

PS:

  • Overall volume of water in the "tank" can not change so the solution when the water is removed faster then the waves travel is ruled out.
  • There possibly can be additional objects presented in the water "tank".
  • It can be some unsual liquid or gas, whith additional "new" properties.

Thanks for your answers.

share|improve this question
    
What is part 1 of the question, could you give a link to it? And I'm not sure if I understand what you are asking about. Do you want to know if for the fluid flows you describe, something that can mathematically be described in analogy to a black hole event horizen can form? The title mislead me a bit, reading only the title I thougt the question is about the fluid dynamics/gravity correspondance what it is not ... –  Dilaton Sep 11 '12 at 21:04
add comment

1 Answer 1

A quick run of "black hole analog" through google produces a number of hits about creating black hole analogues on Bose-Einstein condensates manipulated with light. The analogy is of course not exact but the propagation does exhibit an event horizon, with atomic currents faster than the local speed of sound, strong enough that an analogue of Hawking radiation can hopefully be detected. These analogues have been detected experimentally; for a more accessible resource try this article.

This might sound at odds to your question, but there is no removal of the fluid, whilst the fluid involved is certainly "new" and "unusual".

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.