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In 2010 there were press reports that CERN had identified unusual properties in particle behavour in collisions. One link here.

Here is a partial quote:

"In some sense, it's like the particles talk to each other and they decide which way to go," explained CMS Spokesperson Guido Tonelli.

"There should be a dynamic mechanism there somehow giving them a preferred direction, which is not down to the trivial explanation of momentum and energy conservation. It is something which is so far not fully understood,"

I have been unable to find any scientific papers on this however. So has anyone read a scientific paper on this topic and able to enlighten?

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If You read on some lines in Your link, there a unmistaken words showing that the report is perliminary-preliminary (P²), maybe P³. : Mr Tonelli said the effects were small and had prompted much debate; although he said they probably did not indicate any new physics. "We claim only that we have seen something unusual and we want the scientific community to criticise us, to understand if we did things correctly or if we did something wrong," he added. –  Georg Jan 20 '11 at 12:00
    
Yes, but I dont work at CERN or other lab so I dont have any further idea as to what is observed. A similar effect is suggested at Brookhaven too. There has been a further press comment that it will be studied more in 2011. So it seems a bit odd to be making this kind of press release with no papers to back it up - and no opportunity for us to really comment. –  Roy Simpson Jan 20 '11 at 12:54
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Hello Roy, this is real world! Such press releases are for the general puplic (officialy) but more for the people nodding when CERN needs money, called "politicians".SLAC selled some rest-stuff in Nov/Dec maybe some of the european politicians became nervous. –  Georg Jan 20 '11 at 14:30
    
Hello Georg, this turns out OK after all thanks to the pre-print paper listed by LM below. See my quick summary. The paper takes us right to the frontier of Particle Physics and a still anomalous event. (1/3 of the paper is the collaborator listing!) So this question was successful, but I should close it off and maybe link it to any explanation! –  Roy Simpson Jan 20 '11 at 15:55
    
The Worldwide LHC Computing grid was set up to handle the likely 15 petabytes of data generated yearly by the LHC --WLCG –  Gordon Feb 2 '11 at 16:34

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The BBC report is so vague that one can't really determine what was observed. But here is a more coherent report:

http://motls.blogspot.com/2010/09/lhc-probably-sees-new-shocking-physics.html

The text above also contains the links to the scientific preprint:

http://cms.web.cern.ch/cms/News/2010/QCD-10-002/QCD-10-002.pdf

It is called

Observation of Long-Range, Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Collisions at the LHC

which kind of explains what was seen, too. But see my blog above for more details.

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Thanks Lubos, just to summarise having read your blog there is some evidence of a coherent object identified in the 1-3Gev range. This object was unexpected (against currrent computer models). It isnt the Higgs boson, but it could be something. Lubos suggests that it might be evidence for a kind of String called a Flux Tube.... –  Roy Simpson Jan 20 '11 at 15:17
    
Dear Roy, right, but even if that explanation is right, it is of course a different string from the string whose vibrations produce elementary particles. Or, in the AdS/CFT picture, it's a string at a very different position in the 5th coordinate of spacetime. ;-) It's just the fluxtube of QCD and QCD admits a dual description in terms of strings in AdS space... –  Luboš Motl Jan 20 '11 at 17:52

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