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Are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV analogous to some kind of sound in the vacuum glue?

Background:
There are scalars starting at around 1300 MeV which are probably some combination of glue-condensate sloshing around and quark-condensate sloshing around, some kind of sound in the vacuum glue. Their mass is large, their lifetime is not that big, they have sharp decay properties.

Bonus Question :)
Is there intuitive resemblances of other forces ie EM range in {particle-physics}

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This is a good question--- the answer is partly suggested in the ambiguous literature on glueball searches from the 1990s, perhaps in lattice QCD (you can tune the pion condensate away smoothly using the quark mass). The issue of glueballs is complicated because glue and pion condensates mix strongly, it's hard to separate the two, but there might be a QCD sum rule or a counting argument for degrees of freedom that tells you how much glue and how much chiral condensate in each low lying hadron. –  Ron Maimon Jul 12 '12 at 1:43
    
This is kind of a drive-by comment which I don't have time to elaborate right now-- maybe someone can remind me to come back to it-- but I saw a beautiful talk by Shmuel Nussinov on this topic a couple years ago, which I think is related to arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:0907.1577, although it lacks the nice illustrations I remember from his talk. His slogan, as I remember it, was "don't look for the needle in the haystack, look for the haystack," saying that by looking at the full spectral information, even away from narrow resonances, one gets clues on quark/gluon content. –  Matt Reece Jul 12 '12 at 2:54
    
I hope the link points in the right direction. The scalar states in QCD constitute a very confused and confusing subject, and Nussinov's approach is the one time when I really felt like someone was telling me something very physical that made sense of it. But I would need more time to think to try to reconstruct it, and I don't have that time at this moment. –  Matt Reece Jul 12 '12 at 2:55
    
@mattreece: the site will notify you of activity on the question if you select the star icon. –  Argus Jul 12 '12 at 6:45
    
@MattReece if you have some time to come back to this question any input would be greatly appreciated. –  Argus Sep 8 '12 at 12:51

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