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I am looking for a reference to show me a detailed procedure of numerical calculation of a physical quantity of a lattice. I have knowledge of the physics part and I am able to find it.

My problem is reproducing the correct calculations to be sure that I am on the right track.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Qmechanic Sep 12 '13 at 14:13

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
They teach semester courses just to give students the foundation for this work, and the details depend a lot on the problem. Lattice QCD? Look and see if Peter LePage has a survey article. For other topics maybe someone else can help. –  dmckee Oct 26 '11 at 20:51
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As it stands, there isn't even a question here... –  wsc Oct 27 '11 at 3:47
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You'll hardly find something like this in the standard literature, since computer code is very boring to read. I'd suggest you find a standard Monte Carlo book and start with the Ising model in 1D and 2D for which analytical results are known (energy, correlation functions, magnetization, critical point in 2D, ...). –  Gerben Oct 27 '11 at 6:11
    
Thanks dmckee. Profesor Peter LePage sent me an article of his which I working on that now. However, he refers to another method VEGAS algorithm which I have to find it. –  Matrix Oct 30 '11 at 4:45
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@Mousa: Could you elaborate a bit more what you are trying to calculate? Which property, which lattice, what have you already tried? As an introduction "Computational Physics: Problem Solving with Computers" by Rubin H. Landau might be helpful. For more specific algorithms there are other books or the original research papers. –  Alexander Nov 2 '11 at 18:12