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Since I studied General Relativity I had this question running on my mind. As I see it (just taking lectures of Quantum Field Theory right now)

"Why you need a gauge boson for gravity when the higgs brings things mass?"

You know, mass is the cause for physicist to study differential geometry so why we need another unproven particle, to exist, in order to describe it?

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You can work out that a theory of gravity based upon a scalar field will not be able to produce gravitational lensing, which is an observed effect. –  Jerry Schirmer Oct 26 '11 at 11:48
    
In the linear approximation, GR predicts gravity waves, which can be described by gravitons. This explanation comes up independent of the Higgs Boson. The need for one doesn't really have any bearing on the other. –  P O'Conbhui Mar 31 '12 at 0:15
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The Higgs gives things a rest mass in the standard model, but it is not the only source of rest mass. There is also confining strong interactions, which give hadrons a mass independent of the Higgs.

The graviton mediates gravity, while the Higgs doesn't. The Higgs force is short ranged. The classical graviton is arguably observed already, in the friction of pulsating binaries which matches the prediction of GR for decay due to gravitational waves.

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Uncertainty relation dictates, $m \simeq \dfrac{\hslash}{rv}$, where, $m$ is mass of exchange particle, $r$ is range of force and $v$ velocity of exchange particle.

As, the range of gravitational force in infinite, $r=\infty$, mass of proposed graviton should be zero.

Now, according to Standard model, particles acquire mass by interacting with Higgs field, which pervades everywhere in space. Now, Higgs bosons mediates the action of Higgs field, there mass as predicted is of the order of $ 1 \quad TeV/c^2$.

Hence, as my understanding goes Higgs bosons gives mass, which is the property due to which a force gravity occurs, which is mediated by gravitons which is massless.

They both are needed for different functions.

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