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The standard Lorentz transformations are not correct because in their derivation a logical contradiction is involved: namely in the derivation is assumed that for any value of the velocity, the classical formula x = vt is valid.

A possible corrected Lorentz transformations have the form

enter image description here

It is observed that only to low velocities is valid that

$$X=x-tv+O \left( {v}^{2} \right) $$

Also is observed that the invariance of the hyperbolic length is valid

$${X}^{2}-{c}^{2}{T}^{2}=-{c}^{2}{t}^{2}+{x}^{2}$$

In these corrected Lorentz transforms there is not limit velocity.

Many consequences are derived from the corrected Lorentz transforms. One example is the length contraction according with

enter image description here

In the usual form of the length contract the length tends to zero when the velocity tends to $c$ but in the corrected formula the length tends to zero only when the velocity tends to infinite.

My claim is that only the experiment will determine if the corrected Lorentz transforms are valid. Do you agree?

Note: In the usual derivation of the Lorentz transforms is used that

enter image description here

but this equation is not valid for all value of $v$. I am proposing

enter image description here

or more at general

enter image description here

The following picture compares the usual curve for the length contraction (green curve) with the curve with $n = 14$ (black curve).

enter image description here

These two curves are practically identical except for velocities near to $c$. According with the proposed curve with $n = 14$ the limit velocity is $1.2c$. Only the experiments will determine the correct curve.

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put on hold as off-topic by Danu, joshphysics, Kyle Kanos, ACuriousMind, Valter Moretti 20 hours ago

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "We deal with mainstream physics here. Questions about the general correctness of unpublished personal theories are off topic, although specific questions evaluating new theories in the context of established science are usually allowed. For more information, see Is non mainstream physics appropriate for this site?." – Danu, joshphysics, Kyle Kanos, ACuriousMind, Valter Moretti
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
As it stands, this question is about a theory which is not part of mainstream physics. This type of questions is off-topic on this site (although that does not mean they are necessarily bad!). –  Danu 21 hours ago
    
Have you tried to write this as hyperbolic functions? I'm certain these are the usual Lorentz transformations. Have a look at physics.stackexchange.com/questions/131100/… –  Dox 21 hours ago
    
Please check that the corrected Lorentz transformations are not the usual Lorentz transformations. –  Juan Ospina 21 hours ago
    
How did you come to this last equation? It might be useful to present that argument so that we can show you where your physics intuition fails. –  Kyle Kanos 21 hours ago
5  
The Lorentz transformations have been experimentally tested. (Also, VTC as non-mainstream.) –  ACuriousMind 21 hours ago

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