Take the 2-minute tour ×
Physics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for active researchers, academics and students of physics. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a system where multiple liquids and solids are mixed together with different specific heats at different initial temperatures, reaching an equilibrium temperature, how do all of these things relate to the masses? How could I use all the information given of the other objects to find the mass of one object in the system?

I know Q=cm*deltaT is the formula that relates heat added to the mass, specific heat and temperature change, where normally I could just take m=Q/cdT (I think) and find the mass easily but I am just not sure how to relate this to an entire system where many things are working together. Any pointers would be appreciated, thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you give a sample problem of the type you're considering? Then we can show you how to work through that problem. –  John Rennie Apr 13 at 8:23
    
Every time I do that my question gets blocked. –  Samanthab12 Apr 16 at 3:14

1 Answer 1

In a system where multiple liquids and solids are mixed together with different specific heats at different initial temperatures, reaching an equilibrium temperature, how do all of these things relate to the masses?

In general, you would need to consider Enthalpy of Dissolution and/or Enthalpy of Mixing. For example, if you mix water and sulphuric acid both initially at the same temperature, you will get a higher final temperature. If you mix water and ammonium nitrate both initially at the same temperature, you will get a lower final temperature. Certainly you can not determine a mass from knowledge of the other masses, heat capacities, and initial and final temperature alone in the general case.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.