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I didn't see this listed on the books page so here it is. I'm currently in an introductory Solid State course, and we are using Kittel's book. I have been having a rough time with this book although I am starting to get used to it as we get farther in. What are good introductory solid state books?

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I just want to re-assure you that Kittel's solid state book is horrible. It's not just you. Try Ashcroft and Mermin. It's long but easy to read, good for people with patience. –  DanielSank Mar 24 at 20:57

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Hook and Hall is probably my personal favourite as it is very clear and concise without a lot of fuss.

For a totally different style to the classics maybe try "The Oxford Solid State Basics". The lecture notes on which this book was based are available (in part) online (google steve simon solid state lecture notes and you should get there without much trouble).

If you want something that is based mostly on semiconductor devices you could read basically anything by Sze but a good one to start with is "Physics of Semiconductor Devices".

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I think the “condensed matter physics” written by Michael Marder is a good one. The book is well writen and talks a lot about physics. He also have his lecture notes and syllabus onhiswebsite. You can start learning following his syllabus.

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